Education March 30, 2018: Ivy League: Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth and Penn’s acceptance rates for Class of 2022 most selective year on record 

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EDUCATION

Ivy League: Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth and Penn’s acceptance rates for Class of 2022 most selective year on record

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

(Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

It is Ivy League decision day. Thursday afternoon, March 28, 2018, between 3 and 7 pm, the Ivy League universities sent out acceptances as thousands of anxious high school seniors found out if they would join the scholarly elite. Late Thursday afternoon Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, The University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Yale University released their acceptance data for the Class of 2022 regular admission cycle. All the Ivy League continued the trend towards record low acceptance rates after receiving record high application numbers. Harvard was the most selective, while Cornell was the least. Students have until May 1, to notify the colleges of their decision.

The following is the Ivy League Class of 2022 acceptance data:

Brown University

Brown University sent out only 1,742 offers of admissions out a historic high of 35,438 applications to the Class of 2022.Their acceptance rate was 7.2 percent overall, while the regular admission cycles rate was only 5.5 percent. In December 2017, Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year.

For the Class of 2021, Brown had an 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. In December 2016 as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

Columbia University

For the Class of 2022, Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s acceptance rate fell nearly a third of a percentage point from last year to 5.5 percent. The college admitted only 2,214 applicants. Like the rest of the Ivy League, Columbia received a record number of applications this year, 40,203 combined, early and regular admission cycles, 8 percent more than for the Class of 2021.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, instead of releasing their early decision data, Columbia University only released the number of applications they received this cycle. This year Columbia received 4,085 early decision applications to Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, just one less than for the Class of 2021.
For the Class of 2021, Columbia College had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants.
Cornell

For the Class of 2022, Cornell University admitted 5,288 students out of 51,328 applications; a new record high for the college. Additionally, Cornell waitlisted 6,684 students. The acceptance was also the college’s lowest at 10.3 percent, while it might be a new low for Cornell, but it is the highest in the Ivy League.

For the Class of 2021, Cornell University had one of the largest acceptance rates of all the Ivies with 12.5 percent. Cornell admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a waitlist. In December 2016, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College had a record year for the Class of 2022, they had the lowest acceptance rate, the highest number of applications in “five years” and accepted the least amount of students since the 1990s. Dartmouth accepted 1,925 students out of 22,033 applications making for an acceptance rate of only 8.7 percent.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, Dartmouth College sent out binding early decision acceptance notifications to 565 high school seniors, out of a record number of applications, 2,270 applications. The college also had their lowest acceptance rate since the 2010 cycle with 24.9 percent. Dartmouth has filled up 47 percent of the Class of 2022 with those accepted for early decision, 558 have already enrolled.

Last year, Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021 out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent. In December 2016 as part of the early decision program for the Class of 2021, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Harvard University

Harvard College will keep its crown as the most selective school in the Ivy League for the Class of 2022. The college beat its own record clocking in a 4.59 percent acceptance rate lower by nearly a half a percentage point from the Class of 2021’s 5.2 percent rate. As the Harvard Crimson noted, “This year marks the first time Harvard’s admission rate has ever dipped below 5 percent.”

Harvard admitted only 1,962 students out of their record 42,749 applications. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.” Of those admitted 998 receiving regular cycle offers of admission, which was according to the Harvard Crimson “2.43 percent of the total 36,119 regular decision applicants, plus the 4,882 students deferred in the early action process.”

On Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m., Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program.

In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021.

Princeton University

For the Class of 2022, Princeton University has the second lowest acceptance of all the Ivies, only behind Harvard College. The rate of 5.5 percent is a record-low and more than half percentage point less than for the Class of 2021. Princeton admitted a total of 1,941 students, 1,142 just this regular admission cycle out of the record 35,370 applications, 14 percent higher than applied for the Class of 2021. Additionally, 1,125 students were waitlisted, normally the university accepts between 18 to 101 students from that list.

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 high school seniors for the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was just 6.1 percent. The university admitted 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program.

University of Pennsylvania

For the Class of 2022, The University of Pennsylvania had a record 44,482 applicants but only accepted 3,371 students. The acceptance rate was 8.39 percent, a new low for the university.

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m., Penn sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent. Penn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program.

Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 22 percent acceptance rate.

Yale University

For the Class of 2022, Yale College lowered their acceptance rate to 6.31 percent after increasing the rate and number of students for the Class of 2021. Yale’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced that it accepted 2,229 students from a “record” 35,306 applications they received this year, which was a 7.3 percent increase in applications. Additionally, 1,102 applicants were waitlisted, however, the college is uncertain whether any on the list will be offered admission.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 of their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications.

Yale admitted 1,550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that opened this past fall.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

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Education March 29, 2018: Yale admits fewer students to the Class of 2022, lowers acceptance rate to 6.31 percent 

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Yale admits fewer students to the Class of 2022, lowers acceptance rate to 6.31 percent

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Yale College notified the Class of 2022 of the admission decisions. After last year when Yale became the only Ivy to increase their acceptance rate, now Yale is reversing the trend and their rate was lowered to 6.31 percent. Yale’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced that it accepted 2,229 students from a “record” 35,306 applications they received this year. Additionally, 1,102 applicants were wait listed, however, the college is uncertain whether any on the list will be offered admission.

For the Class of 2022, Yale saw the largest increase in applications for their college in the last five years, with 35,305 applications and rising 7.3 percent since the Class of 2021. As the Yale Daily News explains, “Last year, the number of applications rose around 5 percent from 31,439 for the Class of 2020 to 32,891 for the Class of 2021. Before that, the number of applications rose by 4 percent, from 30,227 for the Class of 2019.” In the five years applications have increased by 19 percent.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 of their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications.

Yale admitted 1,550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent.

Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that opened this fall.

Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan commented on the quality and diversity of the incoming class. Quinlan told the Yale Daily News, “All of our admissions officers continue to be impressed with and humbled by the number of highly qualified applicants in our pool. We’re thrilled that the expansion of Yale College has allowed us to offer admission to such a large number of students from such a variety of backgrounds.”

This past fall the college opened to new residential colleges, Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin and plan to accept more students each year as a result. Yale hopes to have 800 more students attending by the time the Class of 2024 is admitted. The college’s expansion goes against the trend of the other Ivies, who are accepting less students and having lowering acceptance rates. Yale plans on having 1,550 freshman enroll in the fall.

Yale is also touting the incoming class as more diverse, with more minorities and lower-income students accepted. Geographically, it also as diverse with students coming from all 50 states and the territories and internationally from 64 countries.

Scott Wallace-Juedes, director of undergraduate financial aid told the Daily News, “Last year Yale was able to offer need-based financial aid awards to more incoming first years than ever before with the expansion of Yale College. My colleagues and I look forward to working with the admitted students to the class of 2022 to ensure that cost of attendance is not a barrier for any admitted student when considering Yale.” Students have until May 1, to notify the college of their decision.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 27, 2018: Ivy League colleges Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth see record number of applications for Class of 2022 

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Ivy League colleges Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth see record number of applications for Class of 2022

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

More high school seniors are taking a chance at their dream of attending an Ivy League university. Five of the Ivies released their application data for the Class of 2022; Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth. All saw application increases between 7 and 14 percent, pushing them to all break their previous records. Harvard had 42,742 applications, up 8.2 percent, Yale had 35,305 applications, up 7.3 percent, Brown had 35,368 applications, up 8 percent and Dartmouth with 22,005 applications up 9.8 percent. Princeton, however, saw the biggest increase in applications with up 14 percent. Three of the Ivies; Cornell, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania did not release their data. Increase in financial aid packages at the Ivies are attracting the record number of applicants with more minority and low-income students.

Harvard University

This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”
Harvard’s dean of admissions and financial aid, William R. Fitzsimmons explained how unique their aid program is for students. The dean said, “Harvard’s revolutionary financial aid initiative (HFAI), begun 15 years ago and enhanced since then, led the way again this year in attracting students of excellence from throughout the nation and around the world.

Applications have doubled since the inception of the program — and each year more and more students are excited to learn that Harvard is open to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”
For the majority, Harvard’s cost of tuition and fees is almost the same as public universities, because of their financial aid program. As the Gazette indicates, “More than half of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid, and the average grant is $53,000.” Students with families that make up to $150,000, pay only “10 percent or less of their annual incomes.” There are even allowances in certain cases for students whose families annual incomes are above that amount.

Students coming from the lower income brackets earning less than $65,000 a year can now access a “start-up” grant of $2,000 to help them as they start their studies. The Gazette pointed out for the Class of 2022, “Preliminary measures of economic diversity among applicants rose, with 75.5 percent applying for aid and 25.9 percent requesting an application fee waiver.”

This year’s applicant pool is the most diverse demographically for the college, 50.3 percent are women, there is also a 18.7 percent increase of African-American students, and 14.9 percent more Asian-American student applications. There was also an increase in the number of American students applying from all four regions of the country, but the biggest increase was from the South. International student applications, however, remain the same level as from the Class of 2021.

Yale University

Yale saw the largest increase in applications for their college in the last five years, with 35,305 applications and rising 7.3 percent since the Class of 2021. As the Yale Daily News explains, “Last year, the number of applications rose around 5 percent from 31,439 for the Class of 2020 to 32,891 for the Class of 2021. Before that, the number of applications rose by 4 percent, from 30,227 for the Class of 2019.” In the five years applications have increased by 19 percent.

Yale is trying to “emphasize” that it is not the number of applications, but the calibre and achievements of their applicants That matters. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan, commented to the Daily News, “As always, we do not measure success simply by the number of applications we receive. Quality matters much more to the admissions committee.”

The increase in applicants has been across all demographics especially minority groups. In the last five years, 40 percent more racial and ethnic minorities, who are American citizens and residents applied, and there were 37 percent first-generation college students applying. The number that pleases Associate Director of Admissions Mark Dunn the most is the increase of low-income students, whose numbers have increased by 113 percent. Yale has campaigned to reach out to these “high achieving” students, and this past summer mailed 30,000 incoming high school students emphasizing Yale’s “affordability” with financial aid.

Financial-aid is predominately behind the increase of applications at all the Ivies sand elite universities, but Yale has an additional attraction; two new residential colleges that opened at that start of the academic year. The college accepted 200 more students to the Class of 2021. Dunn commented, “I think this helped inspire more high school students who looked to their graduating peers to consider Yale.”

Brown University

Brown also saw record number of applications for the Class of 2022, they received 35,368 applications, up 8 percent from the previous year.
Dean of Admission Logan Powell lauded the applicants in a statement to the Brown Daily Herald. Powell called those vying to be apart of the Class of 2022 “ as strong as any pool in our history.” Powell commended the students, saying, “We continue to be humbled by the incredible talent and diversity of perspective represented in the applicant pool.”

Although application numbers increased from the Class of 2021 across all demographics they’re was a rise in minorities, first generation and low-income students applying. The largest increase was in the number of students of color applying, with a 16 percent increase, representing 45 percent of all applicants up from 42 percent for the Class of 2021.

There was a 13 percent increase in the number of first generation students applying with 18 percent in total up from 17 percent the previous cycle.
The applicants come from “all 50 states” predominantly “California, New York and Massachusetts.” There it’s also a large international contingent, with applicants from “149 other nations” with the biggest share applying from “China, India, and Canada.” The majority of applicants, 60 percent are women.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College had a larger increase in applications than most of the Ivies, jumping 9.8 percent to 22,005 high school senior applying. Lee Coffin, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid remarked, “The big increases in this year’s pools reflect the early success of our expanded recruitment and the new communications plan we have adopted. We have refocused our message to emphasize excellence in teaching and undergraduate access to outstanding teacher-scholars—and students are responding. While the quantity has risen, so has the quality of this year’s applicant pool.”

Princeton University

Of all the Ivies, Princeton saw the greatest increasein applications and the only one above 10 percent. There were 35,386 high school seniors vying a place in Princeton’s Class of 2022, an increase of 14 percent than from the previous year. To demonstrate just how many more applications Princeton received this cycle the Daily Princetonian noted that in 2008, when students applied for the Class of 2012 there were only 13,695 applications, making a 158 percent increase in applications in the past 10 years.

Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye believes the “University’s expanded outreach” is the reason for the larger numbers. Rapelye told the Princetonian, “We have certainly done more outreach to students in this country and traveled widely throughout the world to make sure that we are reaching qualified students.” As with the other Ivies generous financial aid packages are attracting more lower-income students. Rapelye recounted, “We are working more closely with community-based organizations in cities and national organizations that are working with low-income students.”

The was an increase in applications in all demographic groups, but it was most notable among first generation college students, with 16 percent more applying. This is also the first time since 1990, that Princeton is accepting transfer students; another attempt to reach minorities and low-income students, however only 10 to 12 will accepted. The Class of 2022, however, will be smaller 1296 versus the 1306 accepted last year.

All the Ivy League colleges will notify students of the regular cycle decisions on Wednesday, March 28, 2018, and students will have until May 1, to accept or decline the offer of admission. The colleges will still only accept the roughly the same number of students they do each year , and the record high number of applications will only contribute to record low acceptance rates.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 19, 2017: Ivy League, elite schools’ early admission acceptance rates for Class of 2022 MIT has lowest on record, Dartmouth the highest

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Ivy League, elite schools’ early admission acceptance rates for Class of 2022 MIT has lowest on record, Dartmouth the highest

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

(Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

As universities and colleges completed sending out their early admissions offers for the Class of 2022 to hopeful high school seniors let us look at the continuing trend of record low acceptance rates among the Ivy League and most elite universities. Only six of the eight Ivy League universities released data on their early decision and early action cycle. Of the Ivies, Cornell University and Columbia University chose to withhold their data; however, Columbia released the number of applications they received. For the second year in a row, Stanford University, the country’s most selective college refused to release any early admission data. Like last year, they will release their data only after the regular admission cycle when they have finalized all their offers for admission to the Class of 2022.

As has been the trend, Ivy League, and elite universities are becoming more selective, and their early admission rates are falling after receiving a record number of applications. This year is no different the Ivy League and elite universities are continuing the trend and are on track for their most selective year as they choose the Class of 2022. Harvard was the most selective Ivy this early admission cycle, with a 14.5 percent acceptance rate. However, another elite university beat Harvard’s selectivity this early admission cycle. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had the lowest rate, with a record low 6.9 percent of applicants accepted to the Class of 2022. Dartmouth College on the opposite end had the highest acceptance rate with 24.9 percent.

The Ivy League:

Brown University

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year. Although Brown has, a higher acceptance rate than the Ivy League schools, it was a low for them, and Brown’s acceptance rate was only 21 percent for the Class of 2022.

In December 2016 as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent. Brown set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. Last year Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications.

Columbia University

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, instead of releasing their early decision data, Columbia University only released the number of applications they received this cycle. That evening at 7 p.m. Columbia notified high school seniors whether they would be joining the Class of 2022. This year Columbia received 4,085 early decision applications to Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, just one less than for the Class of 2021.

For the Class of 2021, Columbia College had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants. For the Class of 2020, Columbia had a 6.04% acceptance rate, with 2,193 students accepted out of 36,292 applicants. Columbia is notorious for divulging the least information of all the Ivies about their incoming freshmen class only releasing more data for the upcoming application year.

Dartmouth College

On Thursday, Dec. 14, Dartmouth College sent out binding early decision acceptance notifications to 565 high school seniors, the smallest number of students of all the Ivy League schools. The college received a record number of applications, 2,270 applications, the first time the school had over 2,000 applications for the early admissions cycle. The college also had their lowest acceptance rate since the 2010 cycle with 24.9 percent; still, that percentage was the largest of all the Ivies. Dartmouth has filled up 47 percent of the Class of 2022 with those accepted for early decision.

In December 2016 as part of the early decision program for the Class of 2021, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent. Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021 out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent, the second largest in the Ivy League. Dartmouth called last year’s class “the most academically accomplished and globally diverse class the College has ever accepted.”

Harvard University

Harvard College notified students by email on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m. if they were accepted to the Class of 2022, rejected or waitlisted. Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college, and the elite Stanford University only beats it in the country.

In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021. Their admissions represented just 14.5 percent of the applicant pool down only 0.3 percent from 2015. In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. Harvard admitted nearly the same percentage of early applicants as last year a 14.53 acceptance rate this year versus a 14.49 percent rate last year an addition of less than a half percentage point.

Princeton University

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program. Princeton first offered early action admission seven years ago. Students can only apply to Princeton in the early admission cycle, but they can notify the college of their decision by May 1. As Princeton points out the landscape now is radically different from 2011 when the college accepted 21.1 percent of early action applicants. Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was “the lowest in school history.” The University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants.

University of Pennsylvania

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. Ivy League school the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent.

The acceptance rate for the Class of 2022 is the lowest in the school’s history, still, the university did not actually admit that much fewer students than last year. Penn admitted 1,312 students this year and last year they accepted 1,354 students. Penn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program. As the student paper, the Daily Pennsylvanian noted, “Last year approximately 55 percent of the total 2,445 spots available were filled by Early Decision applicants.”

In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a nearly 24 percent acceptance rate. The university targeted goal of 2,445 students enrolling in the fall. Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.”

Yale University

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications. The acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent.

Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. Yale admitted 1550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate.

Elite Universities:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Of all the elite and Ivy League universities that released their early admission data, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had the lowest acceptance rate for the second year in a row. On Thursday, Dec. 14, MIT sent out 664 early action offers of admission to high school seniors for a place in the Class of 2022. This year MIT received a record 9,557 applications, and their acceptance rate was a record low as well at only 6.9 percent. Of those that applied 65 percent, 6,210 students were deferred for the regular cycle, 26.1 percent, 2498 students were rejected; the remaining applicants withdrew from consideration.

For the Class of 2021, In December 2016, MIT had an acceptance rate of 7.8 percent after receiving a then-record 8,394 applications, which had been up 13.9 percent from the previous year. At the regular admission cycle, MIT admitted at 1,438 students out of 20,247 applications received. MIT is one of the most selective colleges, with corresponding acceptance rates. This was the third year MIT opened their early action admissions to international applicants.

Early decision is binding, meaning a student who applies and then is accepted is required to attend the university or college, while early action is non-binding, a student can be accepted and then decide against going to that particular school and can turn down their admission offer. Applying for early admission is not without its risks either, some schools have policies where if a student is rejected in the early admission cycle, cannot reapply for regular admission, however, some universities who do not accept students that applied for early admission, automatically consider them for regular admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 15, 2017: Brown sets early decision admission low for the Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-15-17

Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022 out of a record 3,502 applications making for a 21 percent acceptance rate, the highest among the Ivy League schools. (Source: Brown University Twitter) 

On the last day of early admission decisions from the Ivy League students found out if they were accepted from their coveted school. On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year. Although Brown has, a higher acceptance rate than the Ivy League schools, it was a low for them, and Brown’s acceptance rate was only 21 percent for the Class of 2022.

Previously, Brown set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. Last year Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. Brown also waited listed 1,000 high school seniors. In December as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

In addition to the 738 lucky students that were admitted, 2318 were deferred to the regular admission cycle for reconsideration, 429 were denied admission, there were 14 incomplete applications, and three students withdrew from consideration. The accepted students come from “33 nations and 43 states,” last year they came from “39 nations and 41 U.S. states.” This year a majority of the students come from New York (110), California, and Massachusetts. Most international students are coming from China, the United Kingdom, and India.

This year’s class is the most diverse accepted by Brown during the early decision cycle. As the Brown Daily Herald indicated, “Over 38 percent of the early decision admits — 283 students — identify as people of color, which marks the highest percentage in the University’s history.” Last year, Brown accepted 36 percent of the early decision class that considered themselves people of color, which is “African American, Latino/a Native American, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, or Asian.” The trend continues that more women are accepted than men are to Brown’s early decision. This year “430 students were female and only 308 were male. Last year, “411 accepted students were female and 284 were male.”

Half the students accepted as part of early decision applied for financial aid. This year as part of $30 million Brown Promise Campaign, undergraduate students will not receive loans but grants. Dean of Admission Logan Powell commented, “We couldn’t be happier because it’s a great opportunity for those students offered admission, and obviously a wonderful opportunity for Brown to have those students.” There was, however, a decrease in the number of students accepted who would be the first generation attending college, with only 10 percent, down from 13 percent last year.

Powell said the same type of students accepted in the early decision cycle would be accepted during the regular cycle. Powell said, “Every early decision student who was admitted is exceptional, and would have been admitted in our regular decision round.” The same can be same for the rest of students admitted to the other Ivy League universities this past week. On Tuesday, Dec. 12, Harvard University admitted just 964 students out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college.

Earlier on Wednesday, Princeton University sent out early action admissionoffers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022, out of a record 5,402 applications. Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted. Also on Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022, out of record number 7,074 applications, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent. Also on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale University notified the Class of 2022 their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, out of a record number 5,733 applications, with a 14.7 percent acceptance rate.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

 

 

Education December 14, 2017: Yale admits record low for early action admission to Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Yale University’s acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent. (Source: Yale University News)

On the last day of early admission decisions from the Ivy League students found out if they were accepted from their coveted school. On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications. The acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent.

Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. Yale admitted 1550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. In December, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle.

Of the record 5,733 applications, aside from the 842 accepted high school seniors, 55 percent of the applicants were deferred to the regular admission cycle, 29 percent were downright refused and “2 percent either withdrew or submitted incomplete forms.” Yale has a single-choice early action admission, meaning students can only apply to Yale in the early admission cycle, however it is non-binding and students have until May 1 to notify Yale of their decision.

Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan made a statement to the college’s student paper the Yale Daily News. Quinlan commented on the incoming class, saying, “The Admissions Committee was very impressed with this year’s early applicant pool across every dimension. We are pleased to offer admission to this first group of students in the Class of 2022, and look forward to admitting a much larger group of students through our Regular Decision process this spring.”

Quinlan also commented that Yale is continuing their trend to increase the number of students admitted due to the new residential colleges. The Dean of Admissions said, “The addition of Benjamin Franklin and Pauli Murray colleges enables us to bring to Yale more students from a more diverse collection of backgrounds. The combination of expanding enrollment and greater representation of students from under-resourced backgrounds means more opportunity for more students.”

Yale provided very little information about the pool of those accepted to early action. Director of Outreach and Communications Mark Dunn only commented in November about the applications to early action admission. Dunn said they included “virtually every subgroup of applicants that the admissions office tracks.” Yale has enhanced their financial packages for those coming from “lower-income backgrounds,” in an effort to increase diversity. Yale received applications from “49 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 98 foreign countries.” Dean of Admissions Quinlan wants the final Class of 2022 to be 1,550 students enrolled.

On Tuesday, Dec. 12, Harvard University admitted just 964 students out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college. Earlier on Wednesday, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022, out of a record 5,402 applications. Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted. Also on Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022, out of record number 7,074 applications, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education April 2, 2017: Yale University admits larges freshmen class ever for Class of 2021

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Yale University admits larges freshmen class ever for Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Yale University Admissions

Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. On Thursday afternoon, March 30, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale offered admission this regular cycle to 1550 students, up 15 percent from last year. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. Yale is the only Ivy League university to increase their acceptance rate.

Last year, Yale had a 6.27% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,972 students accepted out of a record 31,455 applicants. In December, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the wait list.

Yale is the only Ivy League university to increase their acceptance rate this year. The increase in acceptance rate and the number of students accepted is because Yale is opening new residential colleges. In the fall, the school’s Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin colleges will begin operations and increase each incoming class by approximately 800 students. Despite accepting about 2000 students, Yale hopes their final Class of 2021will be 1550 students.

Yale wants the public to know despite accepting more high school seniors this year than ever before; they are still accepting highly qualified students, they are just giving more them the opportunity to study at Yale. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeremiah Quinlan indicated, “Although we were thrilled to send out more offers of admissions this year, I remain humbled by the selectivity of our admissions process. Virtually all of the students we denied will be successful students at other great colleges and universities.”

Yale is hailing the Class of 2021 as the most diverse ever, the same tagline all universities are touting these days. The incoming class comes from all 50 states and 63 countries, and 1,500 high schools. There is also an increase in the minority population accepted promising an incoming class of diversity.

With now 14 residential colleges in four years, Yale’s undergraduate class will go from 5,400 to 6,200 students. Dean of Yale College Jonathan Holloway pointed out, “This expansion touches on every aspect of learning, including teaching, facilities, and financial aid. It also provides a historic opportunity to engage the community in asking what it means to receive an education from Yale.”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education April 2, 2017: Ivy League lowest acceptance rates for Class of 2021

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Ivy League lowest acceptance rates for Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman , BA MLIS

 (Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)



It is Ivy League acceptance day. Thursday afternoon, March 30, 2017, at 5 p.m. the Ivy League universities sent out acceptances as thousands of anxious high school seniors found out if they would join the scholarly elite. Late Thursday afternoon Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, The University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Yale University released their acceptance data for the Class of 2021 continuing the trend towards lower acceptance rates for nearly all schools, except Yale.

The following is the Ivy League Class of 2021 acceptance data:

Brown University: Brown University had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. This year Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. Brown also waited listed 1,000 high school seniors. Last year, Brown had a 9% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,919 students accepted out of 32,390 applicants. In December as part of early decision admission, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

Columbia University: Columbia College also had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants. Last year, Columbia had a 6.04% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,193 students accepted out of 36,292 applicants.

Cornell University: Cornell University admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a wait list. Last year, Cornell had a 13.96% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 6,277 students accepted out of 44,966 applicants. In December, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Dartmouth College: Dartmouth College accepted 2,092 students into the Class of 2021out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent, the second largest in the Ivy League. Last year, Dartmouth had a 10.52% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,176 students accepted out of 20,675 applicants. In December as part of the early decision program, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Harvard University: Harvard College admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. The acceptance rate is almost the same as last year when 5.22 percent or 2,037 students were admitted out a historic high amount of 39,044 applications. For the regular admission cycle, Harvard accepted 1,118 students. In December as part of their early action program, Harvard accepted 938 applicants out of 6,473 applications for an acceptance rate of 14.5 percent.

Princeton University: Princeton University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. Princeton has a “target class size” of 1,308 freshmen. Last year, Princeton had a 6.46% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,894 students accepted out of 29,303 applicants. In December, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program. Additionally, Princeton placed 1,168 students on their waitlist.

The University of Pennsylvania: UPenn accepted 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” Last year, UPenn had a 9.4% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 3,661students accepted out of 38,918 applicants. In December, UPenn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 24 percent acceptance rate. The University believes they will have a targeted 2,445 students enrolling in the fall.

Yale UniversityYale University accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. Last year, Yale had a 6.27% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,972 students accepted out of a record 31,455 applicants. In December, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the wait list.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 18, 2016: Ivy League early admissions rates for the Class of 2021

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EDUCATION

Ivy League early admissions rates for the Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Source: Test Prep Gurus

This year even more high school seniors applied to the Ivy League universities looking for a coveted spot as part of their Class of 2021. The record number of applications drove down the acceptance rates as these colleges to new lows. Every year in mid-December, the colleges notify their applicants whether they were accepted denied or deferred to the regular admission cycle. Those fortunate enough to be accepted have to May 1, 2017, to accept their offer of admission. The following Ivy League universities released their early admission acceptance rates for the Class of 2021:

Harvard University: Harvard accepted 938 applicants out of 6,473 applications for an acceptance rate of 14.5 percent.

Princeton University: Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent.

Brown University: Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

The University of Pennsylvania: Penn accepted 1,335 applicants out of 6,147 applications for an acceptance rate of 22 percent.

Cornell University: Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Dartmouth College: Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Yale University: Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Yale was the only Ivy to increase their admission rate, up nine percent from last year because of their two new residential colleges opening in the fall of 2017.

For last year’s acceptance rates read Harvard, Princeton, Stanford admit less early action applicants to Class of 2020

Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS, is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor with a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Universities June 26, 2016: Yale is top for history majors, but Princeton tops graduate programs

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EDUCATION

Yale is top for history majors, but Princeton tops graduate programs

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, June 26, 2016, 1:31 PM MST

Although the number of undergraduates studying history is in decline, the best university to major in the subject is Yale, while Princeton is the top for graduate study
Michael Marsland, Yale University

 

Universities March 31, 2016: Ivy League more selective Princeton, Yale admit less to the Class of 2020

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Ivy League more selective Princeton, Yale admit less to the Class of 2020

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, March 31, 2016, 7:44 PM MST

 On Ivy League acceptance day, most of the universities including Princeton, Yale and Columbia lowered their acceptance rates as the schools saw record number of applicants this year, March 31, 2016
On Ivy League acceptance day, most of the universities including Princeton, Yale and Columbia lowered their acceptance rates as the schools saw record number of applicants this year, March 31, 2016
Yale University

Universities December 27, 2014: Ivy League universities’ early admission rates roundup for the Class of 2019

Ivy League universities’ early admission rates roundup for the Class of 2019

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 27, 2014, 5:59 PM MST

The University of Pennsylvania admitted the most early applicants of the Ivy League universities to the Class of 2019
The University of Pennsylvania admitted the most early applicants of the Ivy League universities to the Class of 2019
Wikipedia

Universities May 21, 2014: How selective will Ivy League universities admission rates go next year?

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EDUCATION

How selective will Ivy League universities admission rates go next year?

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, May 21, 2014, 4:05 AM MST

Although the admissions rates at the Ivy League and elites universities was the lowest ever for the class of 2018, Long Island teen Kwasi Enin managed to be accepted all of the Elite Eight and in the end choosing to attend Yale in the fall of 2014
Although the admissions rates at the Ivy League and elites universities was the lowest ever for the class of 2018, Long Island teen Kwasi Enin managed to be accepted all of the Elite Eight and in the end choosing to attend Yale in the fall of 2014
William Floyd School District

Universities December 23, 2013: Grade inflation again a major issue at Harvard University and in the Ivy League

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Grade inflation again a major issue at Harvard University and in the Ivy League

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 23, 2013, 4:43 PM MST

Harvard University is again at the center of a grade inflation controversy, when it was revealed that As are the most common grade at the undergraduate college, Dec. 4, 2013
Harvard University is again at the center of a grade inflation controversy when it was revealed that As are the most common grade at the undergraduate college, Dec. 4, 2013
Business Insider / Reuters