Politics August 31, 2016: Rubio, McCain, Wasserman Schultz win primaries in Congressional and Senate races

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POLITICS

Rubio, McCain, Wasserman Schultz win primaries in Congressional and Senate races

By Bonnie K. Goodman

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 29: Florida Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) speaks to supporters as he stops to thank volunteers at a phone bank on the final day before the Florida primary election on August 29, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Rubio is facing off against Carlos Beruff for the Republican primary. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

MIAMI, FL – AUGUST 29: Florida Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) speaks to supporters as he stops to thank volunteers at a phone bank on the final day before the Florida primary election on August 29, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Rubio is facing off against Carlos Beruff for the Republican primary. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Three embattled incumbent members of Congress have won their respective primaries. On Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2016, primaries were held across the country for Congressional seats in the House of Representatives and Senate. In Florida, Republican Senator Marco Rubio won his primary as did Republican Arizona Senator John McCain as did Florida Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

In the Florida Senate race, Rubio won against his challenger Carlos Beruff, 72 percent to 19 percent. Most of Rubio’s GOP opponents dropped out after he decided to join the race at the wire three months after his failed bid for the Republican presidential nomination. Rubio will be vying for his second term against Democratic Rep. Patrick Murphy, who beat out his only opponent Rep. Alan Grayson. Major points of attacks are that Rubio missed so much of his Senate term campaigning for president and has not committed to serving the next six-year term, suggesting he might consider another presidential run in 2020. Rubio’s seat is critical for the GOP to maintain control of the Senate.

In the Arizona Senate race, McCain is going for his sixth Senate term and easily defeated his opponent state Senator Kelli Ward. McCain who just turned 80 faced attacks about his age from his much younger, opponent. Ward, who is 47, and a doctor called McCain “old” and “weak” and made his age the main campaign issue implying he could die before his term ends. Republican voters, however, did not agree and chose McCain again, he will face Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick in November.

One of the most vulnerable Democrats, Florida Rep. Wasserman Shultz was able to win her primary against Tim Canova. Canova had the backing of Vermont Senator and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, who rightly found Wasserman Shultz working against his primary campaign. The former Democratic National Committee chairman, Wasserman Schultz was forced to resign the evening before the start of the Democratic National Convention after emails showed her bias against Sanders. The public embarrassment put her primary bid in jeopardy.

This year has not been a good one for Congressional incumbents with five, three Republicans and two Democrats already losing their reelection bids. Those that lost their primaries are “Republican Reps. Renee Ellmers of North Carolina, Randy Forbes of Virginia and Tim Huelskamp of Kansas.” Among the Democrats are Pennsylvania Rep. Chaka Fattah, who was convicted on 23 charges of corruption in June and Florida Rep. Corrine Brown, who was indicted in July on 24 counts of fraud.

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Politics August 6, 2016: Trump finally endorses Paul Ryan, John McCain, and Kelly Ayotte

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Trump finally endorses Paul Ryan, John McCain, and Kelly Ayotte

By Bonnie K. Goodman

GREEN BAY, WI - AUGUST 05: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally on August 5, 2016 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Trump endorsed House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) during the rally in an effort to heal rifts within the Republican Party. (Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

GREEN BAY, WI – AUGUST 05: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally on August 5, 2016 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Trump endorsed House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) during the rally in an effort to heal rifts within the Republican Party. (Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

After a couple of days of drama, Republican nominee Donald Trump endorsed Speaker of the House and Wisconsin Representative Paul Ryan, Arizona Senator John McCain and New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte in their re-election bids for their Congressional and Senate seats. Trump made the endorsements official on Friday evening, Aug. 5, 2016, at a rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Trump expressed that he wanted to be a “big tent” Republican like Ronald Reagan in a speech that was rather unusual for Trump in that he read it off prepared remarks.

Trump in announcing his endorsements stated, “This campaign is not about me or any one candidate, it’s about America. I understand and embrace the wisdom of Ronald Reagan’s big tent within the party. So I embrace the wisdom that my 80 percent friend is not my 20 percent enemy.” Trump emphasized that he would need the support of the House and Senate as president.

Then after 10 minutes into his speech, Trump endorsed Speaker Ryan. Trump remarked, “We will have disagreements, but we will disagree as friends and never stop working together toward victory. And very importantly toward real change. So in our shared mission to make America great again, I support and endorse our speaker of the house Paul Ryan.” Trump’s endorsement comes only days before Ryan’s primary on Tuesday, Aug. 9, where he leads his opponent Paul Nehlen by 66 percent.

Continuing Trump endorsed McCain, both have been highly critical of the other. The GOP nominee said, “And while I’m at it, I hold in the highest esteem Senator John McCain for his service to our country in uniform and public office, and I fully support and endorse his reelection Very important. We’ll work together.”

After the rally, Trump’s campaign sent a fundraising email to supporters touting party unity and the endorsements. The email read, “It’s time to unite our Party and deny the third term of Obama. I have officially endorsed Paul Ryan — and together, we will fight for YOU, and together we will Make America Great Again!”

The controversy over the Ryan endorsement commenced on Tuesday, Aug. 2 when Trump spoke to the Washington for an interview. Trump echoed Ryan earlier comments about endorsing him back in May. The GOP nominee said, “I like Paul, but these are horrible times for our country. We need very strong leadership. We need very, very strong leadership. And I’m just not quite there yet. I’m not quite there yet.”

Trump running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence broke with Trump over the endorsements choosing to endorse Ryan on Wednesday, Aug. 3. Pence endorsed Ryan in a phone interview with Fox News, stating, “I strongly support Paul Ryan, strongly endorse his re-election. He is a longtime friend. He’s a strong conservative leader. I believe we need Paul Ryan in leadership in the Congress of the United States.”
Pence later tweeted that he told his running mate in advance of his decision, “I talked to @realDonaldTrump this morning about my support for Paul Ryan and our longtime friend ship….” According to a Trump campaign insider, the GOP nominee is giving Pence “latitude” to speak his mind and convictions, and Pence’s endorsement was hardly a falling out.

Trump’s withholding the endorsement, however, was causing friction with fellow Republicans, who were quickly abandoning the GOP nominee. Even Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus, a friend of Ryan’s and also from Wisconsin, was upset at Trump veering off the script.

Trump’s decision to endorse Ryan came only hours after Ryan suggested he could be easily unendorsed Trump if he sees fit. On Friday morning, Ryan told local Wisconsin radio WTAQ’s Jerry Bader, “None of these things are ever blank checks, that goes with any situation in any kind of race.” Continuing Ryan explained why he endorsed Trump in the first place, “he won the delegates, he won the thing fair and square it’s just that simple.”

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