Education June 1, 2018: Harvard remains on top of Times Higher Education’s World Reputation Rankings for eighth year

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EDUCATION

Harvard remains on top of Times Higher Education’s World Reputation Rankings for eighth year

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The crown jewel of the Ivy League, Harvard University again is the world most prestigious university reputation-wise. Photo: Harvard.edu

When it comes to reputation, no university in the world can surpass Harvard, who is again the top university. On Wednesday, May 30, 2018, The Times Higher Education released their eighth annual World Reputation Rankingwith Harvard University remaining in the top spot for seven years in a row. American and universities have held steady despite concerns over Donald Trump’s presidency. British universities have not held up as well after the vote for Brexit, Britain’s exit from the European Union. Asian universities, however, have also stalled despite their recent rise.

Eight of the top 10 were American universities, with only the United Kingdom breaking up their domination. The top three remains the same as last year and are all American universities, with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the second place, and Stanford University in third. British universities round out the top five with the Universities of Cambridge at fourth and Oxford down one to fifth place.

There was little movement in the middle of the top ten. The University of California, Berkeley remains in sixth place, Princeton University stays in seventh, while Yale University remains in eighth place. The big change was at the bottom of the top 10, the University of Chicago stays at ninth but now shares the position, tied with new top ten entry, the University of California, Los Angeles for ninth. The California Institute of Technology, Caltech drops off out of the top ten moving from 10th to 11th position.

The ranking is considered, “the definitive list of the world’s most prestigious universities.” Phil Baty, the rankings editor for THE, explains, “Reputation is the global currency of higher education. It may be subjective; it may not always be fair, but it matters deeply.” THE’s World Reputation Rankings “have become a major fixture in the higher education calendar — serving as a yearly global academic brand audit and attracting news headlines across the world.”

The ranking is international, with 19 countries represented in the top 100 universities. The United States has the most schools in the ranking 44 institutions represented in the top 100, 28 alone in the top 50, with Harvard the top ranking. Despite, concerns that President Donald Trump’s immigration policies would turn off international students, and affect American universities standings that have not been the case.

Baty commented on American universities standing in the world, saying, “What is particularly striking is that the U.S. has actually strengthened its position in the world… despite fears that the U.S. is suffering a ‘Trump slump’ in terms of its global reputation. While we have seen evidence that some international students are seeing the U.S. as a less attractive option, with declining applications, this data from the global academic community suggests the top U.S. universities remain the most highly regarded in the world by a mile.”

In the second place, the United Kingdom has the second most universities in the ranking, with the University of Cambridge as the country’s the top school and Oxford University also in the top five breaking up the American monopoly. The UK, however, has not fared as well as post-Brexit, exit from the European Union vote. UK universities slipped in the new ranking, from a British publication no less. Last year there were 10 schools in the top 100, this year they have nine, with Durham University falling below the top 100. Other schools saw their numbers fall, King’s College London (41st) and Edinburgh (34th), both lost one place in the ranking. While top 20 schools, University College London (18th) and Imperial College (20th), both lost two positions from last year. The London School of Economics saw the greatest loss, going from 20th to 25th place this edition.

Brexit is not the only issue plaguing, British universities, some schools did poorly in the Government’s new Teaching Excellence Framework, which looks at “quality of teaching” in high education. There have been issues and controversies on campus, which scandals and questioning the “excessive pays” for university administration, while “snowflake” students are hindering freedom of speech, and do not want to be taught controversial topics.

Alan Smithers, a professor of education at the University of Buckingham, told the Daily Mail, “This hasn’t been a good year for the reputation of the UK’s universities, with rows about pay, safe spaces and freedom of speech. We need to up our game to ensure that the falls this year are not the beginning of a trend.”

Neither is Asian universities taking over the ranking has been the trend in recent years, while American and British are getting votes from all over the world, Asian schools get their votes mostly in the region, their brands are regional only. Many schools from China and Japan have lost ground in the ranking. China has six schools in the top 100, with three of them falling the ranking, however, China’s best school’s Tsinghua and Peking Universities remain in the top 20, at 14th and 17th place as they were in 2017. Japan’s standing is in the most trouble among Asian schools, they lose one school in the top 100, going down to five. However, the highest-ranking university outside the US and UK comes from Japan with The University of Tokyo at the 13th place down from 11th last year.

Simon Marginson, an analyst and director of University College London’s Centre for Global Higher Education, claims the difference is because of “improved real performance and the reputational effects it generates.” According to Marginson, top universities in the US and the UK “earned their reputations over the whole 20th century and beyond and have not slipped in standard, so they are difficult to displace.” Asian universities including from Singapore and South Korea, “only really showed themselves as strong in the 1990s, and China’s rise is essentially post-2000.” Baty also indicates that Asian, particularly Chinese schools rose quickly, but now “stalled.” According to Baty, “This new data shows just how hard it is for emerging powers to break into the traditional global elite.”

The three Asian universities fare better than any European institutions, where the top school ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, which remains at 22, but now, tied with Canada’s University of Toronto. European universities are also “losing ground.” Germany, the European country with the most universities in the top 100 still has their six, but three of them are ranking lowered than the last edition. Australia’s universities have also dropped in the ranking, although they maintain three in the top 100, two have fallen since last year, the University of Melbourne is the top school at tied for 47th place. In the Middle East, Israel’s highest-ranking school remains the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; it enters the top 100 in the 91–100 position.

Canada has three universities in the top 100, with the University of Toronto, the country’s top school moving up from 24 to tie for 22nd position. Meanwhile, the University of British Columbia is in second place in the country moves up two spots to number 38. McGill University, which usually ranks as the top university in Canadian rankings, is only third in THE’s World Reputation Ranking of all Canadian schools, and also moves up, one place to 41st.

The rankings are entirely based on the opinion of the institutions, as THE explains, “The rankings are entirely subjective — they are based purely on an annual opinion survey.” The methodology for determining the rankings consists of sending the survey to “more than 10,000 top scholars from around the world. Each academic was asked to name up to 15 universities that they believe are the best for research and teaching in their discipline. Votes for institutions based on research prowess were given twice the weight of those for teaching.”

Top 10 World Reputation Rankings

2018 reputation rank — 2017 reputation rank — Institution Country

1, 1 Harvard University, United States,

2, 2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States

3, 3 Stanford University, United States,

4, 4 University of Cambridge, United Kingdom,

5, 5 University of Oxford, United Kingdom,

6, 6 University of California, Berkeley, United States

7, 7 Princeton University, United States, 7

8, 8 Yale University, United States, 12

=9, 13 University of California, Los Angeles

=9, 9 University of Chicago

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has over a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

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Education May 30, 2018: Harvard remains CWUR World Ranking’s top university in 2018/2019

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Harvard remains CWUR World Ranking’s top university in 2018/2019

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Photo: Harvard.edu

The first major university ranking of the year released is the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR), who publishes their list way before the start of the new academic year. On Monday, May 28, 2018, CWUR released their ranking of the Top 1000 Universities in the world, where once again Harvard remained the top university, now for the seventh year running.

The CWUR is one of only two major rankings that are not published by a western country in either the United States or the United Kingdom. CWUR is centered in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Although the top schools remained the same, the ranking saw a lot of movement especially in the ranking of the countries and their individual top schools representing a changing landscape in the best global universities.

The 2018 edition is the seventh year CWUR has released their rankings; the relatively new listing first started in 2012. It includes their ranking of the Top 1000 Universities and 61 countries, the largest number. After Harvard, the rest of the top three remains the same as last year with Stanford second and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) third. Two British universities round out the top five as last year, with the University of Cambridge in fourth place closely followed by the University of Oxford rounding out the top five.

The second half of the top ten had a lot of movement, the University of California, Berkeley moved up one spot from seventh to sit at the sixth position. Princeton University also moved up, two spots from the ninth to the seventh position. Columbia University moved down two places to the eighth position. Only one university entered the top ten the California Institute of Technology, Caltech moving up from number 11 to the ninth place. While the University of Chicago fell two spot to round out the top ten. Yale University dropped out of the top ten this year to number 11.

The US dominated the CWUR rankings as it does with most other world university rankings; however, there are less American schools in the top 1000, last year there were 225 this year there are only 213. The CWUR ranking shows how preeminent Asian schools are becoming globally, here they follow the US in the most school represented an honor usually reserved for the United Kingdom. This year’s edition there are more schools that are Asian represented, there are 108 schools from China listed, the number keep rising, with 97 in 2017 and 90 in 2016.

The United Kingdom has improved their standing, but and have lowered the number of universities represented, they have 62 schools listed down from 65, but now have the third most schools in the ranking. The UK has consistently two universities in the top ten, and they are the only other country to break American dominance. Only four universities from the 24 that are part of the Russell Group fell in the ranking.

The UK rise in the country ranking has more to do with Japan losing ground that any improvement in their standing. In the past three ranking Japan’s number of schools represented has dwindled. Currently Japan has 56 schools in the list down from 71 in 2017 and 74 in 2016. Still, Japan has the first school to make the global list outside of the US and the UK with the University of Tokyo up one to at number 12, which also the top ranking Asian school.

France this year takes third place in the world with 58 schools featured, and the Sorbonne University as their top school coming in the top 30 at 29 and replacing École Polytechnique for the honor.

CWUR also includes rankings by country, with lists of the best universities in the major countries in all the world’s regions and they correspond to the rankings on the international list. Therefore, Harvard also tops the USA list, while the number four University of Cambridge is the United Kingdom’s top school. The first university ranking from the European continent is Switzerland’s Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, which ranks at 28th down one from last year. In Oceania, Australia has the top school with the University of Melbourne at 57, replacing the University of Sydney for the top place.

Canada is only the fourth country to reach the top 20, with the University of Toronto at 17th place moving up from 28 last year. Overall, Canada is in 10th place with 28 universities on the list, but all their top school moving up; the University of Toronto also remains Canada’ top school again this year. McGill retains their position in second place ranking at 37th up from 41 last year. At their heels is third place the University of British Columbia at number 38 up from 55 in the last edition.

In the Middle East, the Weizmann Institute of Science replaces the Hebrew University of Jerusalem as the Middle East and Israel’s highest-ranking university. The title is hardly a victory, the Weizmann Institute ranks at number 45 down from 39 last year. Hebrew University fell over 30 places from 27th last year to just 61st this year. Hebrew U usually ranks as Israel’s top university. Israel has one other school in the top 100 is the Tel Aviv University at 85. Israel has seven schools represented in the ranking.

The key to their methodology is objectivity; all the seven indicators are backed by solid, quantifiable statistics emphasizing graduate success and faculty research. The seven factors are “quality of teaching, alumni employment, quality of faculty, research output, quality publications, influence, and citations.” This year CWUR revised their methodology with “research now accounting for 70% of the total score.” According to the description of their methodology, “The Centre for World University Rankings (CWUR) publishes the only global university ranking that measures the quality of education and training of students along with the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.”

Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) top 10:

1. Harvard University (1)

2. Stanford University (2)

3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (3)

4. University of Cambridge (4)

5. University of Oxford (5)

6. University of California, Berkeley (7)

7. Princeton University (9)

8. Columbia University (6)

9. California Institute of Technology (11)

10. University of Chicago (8)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has over a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 30, 2018: Ivy League: Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth and Penn’s acceptance rates for Class of 2022 most selective year on record 

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Ivy League: Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth and Penn’s acceptance rates for Class of 2022 most selective year on record

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

(Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

It is Ivy League decision day. Thursday afternoon, March 28, 2018, between 3 and 7 pm, the Ivy League universities sent out acceptances as thousands of anxious high school seniors found out if they would join the scholarly elite. Late Thursday afternoon Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, The University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Yale University released their acceptance data for the Class of 2022 regular admission cycle. All the Ivy League continued the trend towards record low acceptance rates after receiving record high application numbers. Harvard was the most selective, while Cornell was the least. Students have until May 1, to notify the colleges of their decision.

The following is the Ivy League Class of 2022 acceptance data:

Brown University

Brown University sent out only 1,742 offers of admissions out a historic high of 35,438 applications to the Class of 2022.Their acceptance rate was 7.2 percent overall, while the regular admission cycles rate was only 5.5 percent. In December 2017, Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year.

For the Class of 2021, Brown had an 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. In December 2016 as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

Columbia University

For the Class of 2022, Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s acceptance rate fell nearly a third of a percentage point from last year to 5.5 percent. The college admitted only 2,214 applicants. Like the rest of the Ivy League, Columbia received a record number of applications this year, 40,203 combined, early and regular admission cycles, 8 percent more than for the Class of 2021.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, instead of releasing their early decision data, Columbia University only released the number of applications they received this cycle. This year Columbia received 4,085 early decision applications to Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, just one less than for the Class of 2021.
For the Class of 2021, Columbia College had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants.
Cornell

For the Class of 2022, Cornell University admitted 5,288 students out of 51,328 applications; a new record high for the college. Additionally, Cornell waitlisted 6,684 students. The acceptance was also the college’s lowest at 10.3 percent, while it might be a new low for Cornell, but it is the highest in the Ivy League.

For the Class of 2021, Cornell University had one of the largest acceptance rates of all the Ivies with 12.5 percent. Cornell admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a waitlist. In December 2016, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College had a record year for the Class of 2022, they had the lowest acceptance rate, the highest number of applications in “five years” and accepted the least amount of students since the 1990s. Dartmouth accepted 1,925 students out of 22,033 applications making for an acceptance rate of only 8.7 percent.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, Dartmouth College sent out binding early decision acceptance notifications to 565 high school seniors, out of a record number of applications, 2,270 applications. The college also had their lowest acceptance rate since the 2010 cycle with 24.9 percent. Dartmouth has filled up 47 percent of the Class of 2022 with those accepted for early decision, 558 have already enrolled.

Last year, Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021 out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent. In December 2016 as part of the early decision program for the Class of 2021, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Harvard University

Harvard College will keep its crown as the most selective school in the Ivy League for the Class of 2022. The college beat its own record clocking in a 4.59 percent acceptance rate lower by nearly a half a percentage point from the Class of 2021’s 5.2 percent rate. As the Harvard Crimson noted, “This year marks the first time Harvard’s admission rate has ever dipped below 5 percent.”

Harvard admitted only 1,962 students out of their record 42,749 applications. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.” Of those admitted 998 receiving regular cycle offers of admission, which was according to the Harvard Crimson “2.43 percent of the total 36,119 regular decision applicants, plus the 4,882 students deferred in the early action process.”

On Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m., Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program.

In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021.

Princeton University

For the Class of 2022, Princeton University has the second lowest acceptance of all the Ivies, only behind Harvard College. The rate of 5.5 percent is a record-low and more than half percentage point less than for the Class of 2021. Princeton admitted a total of 1,941 students, 1,142 just this regular admission cycle out of the record 35,370 applications, 14 percent higher than applied for the Class of 2021. Additionally, 1,125 students were waitlisted, normally the university accepts between 18 to 101 students from that list.

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 high school seniors for the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was just 6.1 percent. The university admitted 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program.

University of Pennsylvania

For the Class of 2022, The University of Pennsylvania had a record 44,482 applicants but only accepted 3,371 students. The acceptance rate was 8.39 percent, a new low for the university.

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m., Penn sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent. Penn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program.

Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 22 percent acceptance rate.

Yale University

For the Class of 2022, Yale College lowered their acceptance rate to 6.31 percent after increasing the rate and number of students for the Class of 2021. Yale’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced that it accepted 2,229 students from a “record” 35,306 applications they received this year, which was a 7.3 percent increase in applications. Additionally, 1,102 applicants were waitlisted, however, the college is uncertain whether any on the list will be offered admission.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 of their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications.

Yale admitted 1,550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that opened this past fall.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 28, 2018: Harvard hits new record-low admitting the Class of 2022 with only a 4.59 percent acceptance rate

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Harvard hits new record-low admitting the Class of 2022 with only a 4.59 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Harvard College notified the Class of 2022 of the admission decisions. This year Harvard will keep it’s crown as the most selective school in the Ivy League. The college beat its own record clocking in a 4.59 percent acceptance rate lower by nearly a half a percentage point from the Class of 2021’s 5.2 percent rate. As the Harvard Crimson noted, “This year marks the first time Harvard’s admission rate has ever dipped below 5 percent.” Harvard admitted only 1,962 students out of their record 42,749 applications. Of those admitted 998 receiving regular cycle offers of admission, which was according to the Harvard Crimson “2.43 percent of the total 36,119 regular decision applicants, plus the 4,882 students deferred in the early action process.”

This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”

Harvard College notified students by email on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m. if they were accepted to the Class of 2022, rejected or waitlisted. Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college, and the elite Stanford University only beats it in the country.

In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021. Their admissions represented just 14.5 percent of the applicant pool down only 0.3 percent from 2015. Harvard admitted nearly the same percentage of early applicants as the Class of 2020 a 14.53 acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 versus a 14.49 percent rate for 2020 an addition of less than a half percentage point.

Although Harvard saw a record number of applicants they accepted less students than last year. For the Class of 2021 a record number accepted the colleges offer of admission leading to an overcrowding in the residences. The college also hopes to admit 40 to 100 students on the waitlist, last year none were.

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons commended the incoming freshman class. Fitzsimons expressed to the Crimson, “They are quite an amazing cohort of people because they’re coming from the widest range of economic and ethnic backgrounds in our history.”

The class is one of Harvard’s most diverse ever. Women represent a small majority of the class, with 50.1 percent, up from last year’s 49.2 percent, and for “The first time in 10 years, a majority of accepted students are women.” The diversity extends to all demographic groups, including racial minorities making record strides. African-American students represent 15.5 percent, up from 14.6. This year 12.2 percent of the class are Hispanic students, up from 11.6 percent. Native Americans, however, saw a marginal rise from 1.9 to 2 percent.

Asian-Americans represented the largest minority group accepted. A record 22.7 percent up slightly from 22.2 percent as the university faces a lawsuit on their admission process for the group that has also sparked a United States Department of Justice discrimination investigation. Harvard has steadfastly denied the allegations, blaming other factors for lower rates in admitting Asian-American students in the past.

Harvard has been trying to attract more lower income students with their generous Harvard Financial Aid Initiative, and it has worked with a Class of 2022 that is more economically diverse. The college has made the greatest gains with first generation college students, with 17.3 percent up from 15.1 last year. Over half of Harvard undergrads receive financial aid, 20 percent are from low-income families and do not have to contribute anything to their tuition, while “a record 20.3 percent of the Class of 2022 will be eligible for Federal Pell grants.

This year’s class is diverse geographically as well. They come from “50 states and 90 countries.” International student numbers have rebounded up to 12 percent from last year’s 11.4 percent. Harvard hopes to have a class of 1,665 freshman in the fall. Students have until May 1, to notify the college of their decision.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 27, 2018: Ivy League colleges Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth see record number of applications for Class of 2022 

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EDUCATION

Ivy League colleges Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth see record number of applications for Class of 2022

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

More high school seniors are taking a chance at their dream of attending an Ivy League university. Five of the Ivies released their application data for the Class of 2022; Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth. All saw application increases between 7 and 14 percent, pushing them to all break their previous records. Harvard had 42,742 applications, up 8.2 percent, Yale had 35,305 applications, up 7.3 percent, Brown had 35,368 applications, up 8 percent and Dartmouth with 22,005 applications up 9.8 percent. Princeton, however, saw the biggest increase in applications with up 14 percent. Three of the Ivies; Cornell, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania did not release their data. Increase in financial aid packages at the Ivies are attracting the record number of applicants with more minority and low-income students.

Harvard University

This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”
Harvard’s dean of admissions and financial aid, William R. Fitzsimmons explained how unique their aid program is for students. The dean said, “Harvard’s revolutionary financial aid initiative (HFAI), begun 15 years ago and enhanced since then, led the way again this year in attracting students of excellence from throughout the nation and around the world.

Applications have doubled since the inception of the program — and each year more and more students are excited to learn that Harvard is open to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”
For the majority, Harvard’s cost of tuition and fees is almost the same as public universities, because of their financial aid program. As the Gazette indicates, “More than half of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid, and the average grant is $53,000.” Students with families that make up to $150,000, pay only “10 percent or less of their annual incomes.” There are even allowances in certain cases for students whose families annual incomes are above that amount.

Students coming from the lower income brackets earning less than $65,000 a year can now access a “start-up” grant of $2,000 to help them as they start their studies. The Gazette pointed out for the Class of 2022, “Preliminary measures of economic diversity among applicants rose, with 75.5 percent applying for aid and 25.9 percent requesting an application fee waiver.”

This year’s applicant pool is the most diverse demographically for the college, 50.3 percent are women, there is also a 18.7 percent increase of African-American students, and 14.9 percent more Asian-American student applications. There was also an increase in the number of American students applying from all four regions of the country, but the biggest increase was from the South. International student applications, however, remain the same level as from the Class of 2021.

Yale University

Yale saw the largest increase in applications for their college in the last five years, with 35,305 applications and rising 7.3 percent since the Class of 2021. As the Yale Daily News explains, “Last year, the number of applications rose around 5 percent from 31,439 for the Class of 2020 to 32,891 for the Class of 2021. Before that, the number of applications rose by 4 percent, from 30,227 for the Class of 2019.” In the five years applications have increased by 19 percent.

Yale is trying to “emphasize” that it is not the number of applications, but the calibre and achievements of their applicants That matters. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan, commented to the Daily News, “As always, we do not measure success simply by the number of applications we receive. Quality matters much more to the admissions committee.”

The increase in applicants has been across all demographics especially minority groups. In the last five years, 40 percent more racial and ethnic minorities, who are American citizens and residents applied, and there were 37 percent first-generation college students applying. The number that pleases Associate Director of Admissions Mark Dunn the most is the increase of low-income students, whose numbers have increased by 113 percent. Yale has campaigned to reach out to these “high achieving” students, and this past summer mailed 30,000 incoming high school students emphasizing Yale’s “affordability” with financial aid.

Financial-aid is predominately behind the increase of applications at all the Ivies sand elite universities, but Yale has an additional attraction; two new residential colleges that opened at that start of the academic year. The college accepted 200 more students to the Class of 2021. Dunn commented, “I think this helped inspire more high school students who looked to their graduating peers to consider Yale.”

Brown University

Brown also saw record number of applications for the Class of 2022, they received 35,368 applications, up 8 percent from the previous year.
Dean of Admission Logan Powell lauded the applicants in a statement to the Brown Daily Herald. Powell called those vying to be apart of the Class of 2022 “ as strong as any pool in our history.” Powell commended the students, saying, “We continue to be humbled by the incredible talent and diversity of perspective represented in the applicant pool.”

Although application numbers increased from the Class of 2021 across all demographics they’re was a rise in minorities, first generation and low-income students applying. The largest increase was in the number of students of color applying, with a 16 percent increase, representing 45 percent of all applicants up from 42 percent for the Class of 2021.

There was a 13 percent increase in the number of first generation students applying with 18 percent in total up from 17 percent the previous cycle.
The applicants come from “all 50 states” predominantly “California, New York and Massachusetts.” There it’s also a large international contingent, with applicants from “149 other nations” with the biggest share applying from “China, India, and Canada.” The majority of applicants, 60 percent are women.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College had a larger increase in applications than most of the Ivies, jumping 9.8 percent to 22,005 high school senior applying. Lee Coffin, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid remarked, “The big increases in this year’s pools reflect the early success of our expanded recruitment and the new communications plan we have adopted. We have refocused our message to emphasize excellence in teaching and undergraduate access to outstanding teacher-scholars—and students are responding. While the quantity has risen, so has the quality of this year’s applicant pool.”

Princeton University

Of all the Ivies, Princeton saw the greatest increasein applications and the only one above 10 percent. There were 35,386 high school seniors vying a place in Princeton’s Class of 2022, an increase of 14 percent than from the previous year. To demonstrate just how many more applications Princeton received this cycle the Daily Princetonian noted that in 2008, when students applied for the Class of 2012 there were only 13,695 applications, making a 158 percent increase in applications in the past 10 years.

Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye believes the “University’s expanded outreach” is the reason for the larger numbers. Rapelye told the Princetonian, “We have certainly done more outreach to students in this country and traveled widely throughout the world to make sure that we are reaching qualified students.” As with the other Ivies generous financial aid packages are attracting more lower-income students. Rapelye recounted, “We are working more closely with community-based organizations in cities and national organizations that are working with low-income students.”

The was an increase in applications in all demographic groups, but it was most notable among first generation college students, with 16 percent more applying. This is also the first time since 1990, that Princeton is accepting transfer students; another attempt to reach minorities and low-income students, however only 10 to 12 will accepted. The Class of 2022, however, will be smaller 1296 versus the 1306 accepted last year.

All the Ivy League colleges will notify students of the regular cycle decisions on Wednesday, March 28, 2018, and students will have until May 1, to accept or decline the offer of admission. The colleges will still only accept the roughly the same number of students they do each year , and the record high number of applications will only contribute to record low acceptance rates.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 26, 2018: Harvard to stop requiring SAT and ACT writing section for Class of 2023 Admissions

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Harvard to stop requiring SAT and ACT writing section for Class of 2023 Admissions

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Harvard College will no longer require students applying to the college to take the SAT and ACT writing section. Harvard College

It just became easier to apply to Harvard College. Harvard announced on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, that it will no longer require students applying to the college to take the writing section of the SAT and ACT standardized exams used for college admissions. Harvard will look for students applying to submit other forms of writing samples with their applications. Now a majority of Ivy League colleges do not require the writing section.

College spokesperson Rachel Dane told the Harvard Crimson in an emailed statement about the policy change. Dane explained, “Harvard will accept the ACT/SAT with or without writing, starting with the Class of 2023, entering in August 2019. This change will add an additional component to the comprehensive outreach of the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative (HFAI), which seeks outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”

The majority of high school students taking the exam opt for completing the writing portion. More universities, however, are not requiring the essay section. Only 28 schools want the section completed among them three Ivies; Brown, Dartmouth, and Yale. While Ivies, Columbia, Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania cease to require the section in 2015. Among the other elite universities the Massachusetts Institute of Technology does not require it, but Stanford, the most coveted and selective university still wants applicants to take the writing component.

Removing the exam element is meant to attract more diverse and economically challenged students. The section is an additional cost as the Crimson reports it costs “$14 for the SAT and $16.50 for the ACT, though fee waivers are available for both.”

When the College Board revised the SAT exam they commented on the optional writing section in their official statement. Even the College Board diminished the importance of the section. The Board expressed, “One single essay historically has not contributed significantly to the overall predictive power of the exam. Feedback from hundreds of member admission officers was divided: some respondents found the essay useful, but many did not. The College Board remains steadfast in its commitment to the importance of analytic writing for all students.”

Removing another hurdle with no doubt increase the number of applicants to the most popular Ivy. This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”

Harvard’s dean of admissions and financial aid, William R. Fitzsimmons explained how unique their aid program is for students. The dean said, “Harvard’s revolutionary financial aid initiative (HFAI), begun 15 years ago and enhanced since then, led the way again this year in attracting students of excellence from throughout the nation and around the world. Applications have doubled since the inception of the program — and each year more and more students are excited to learn that Harvard is open to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”

For the majority, Harvard’s cost of tuition and fees is almost the same as public universities, because of their financial aid program. As the Gazette indicates, “More than half of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid, and the average grant is $53,000.” Students with families that make up to $150,000, pay only “10 percent or less of their annual incomes.” There are even allowances in certain cases for students whose families annual incomes are above that amount.

Students coming from the lower income brackets earning less than $65,000 a year can now access a “start-up” grant of $2,000 to help them as they start their studies. The Gazette pointed out for the Class of 2022, “Preliminary measures of economic diversity among applicants rose, with 75.5 percent applying for aid and 25.9 percent requesting an application fee waiver.”

Removing the writing requirement will only continue the trend of helping students reach their potential and attend Harvard regardless of their economic situation. This year’s applicant pool is the most diverse for the college, 50.3 percent are women, a 18.7 percent increase of African-American students, and 14.9 percent more Asian-American student applications. Harvard will notify the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions on March 28.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 15, 2017: Brown sets early decision admission low for the Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-15-17

Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022 out of a record 3,502 applications making for a 21 percent acceptance rate, the highest among the Ivy League schools. (Source: Brown University Twitter) 

On the last day of early admission decisions from the Ivy League students found out if they were accepted from their coveted school. On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year. Although Brown has, a higher acceptance rate than the Ivy League schools, it was a low for them, and Brown’s acceptance rate was only 21 percent for the Class of 2022.

Previously, Brown set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. Last year Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. Brown also waited listed 1,000 high school seniors. In December as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

In addition to the 738 lucky students that were admitted, 2318 were deferred to the regular admission cycle for reconsideration, 429 were denied admission, there were 14 incomplete applications, and three students withdrew from consideration. The accepted students come from “33 nations and 43 states,” last year they came from “39 nations and 41 U.S. states.” This year a majority of the students come from New York (110), California, and Massachusetts. Most international students are coming from China, the United Kingdom, and India.

This year’s class is the most diverse accepted by Brown during the early decision cycle. As the Brown Daily Herald indicated, “Over 38 percent of the early decision admits — 283 students — identify as people of color, which marks the highest percentage in the University’s history.” Last year, Brown accepted 36 percent of the early decision class that considered themselves people of color, which is “African American, Latino/a Native American, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, or Asian.” The trend continues that more women are accepted than men are to Brown’s early decision. This year “430 students were female and only 308 were male. Last year, “411 accepted students were female and 284 were male.”

Half the students accepted as part of early decision applied for financial aid. This year as part of $30 million Brown Promise Campaign, undergraduate students will not receive loans but grants. Dean of Admission Logan Powell commented, “We couldn’t be happier because it’s a great opportunity for those students offered admission, and obviously a wonderful opportunity for Brown to have those students.” There was, however, a decrease in the number of students accepted who would be the first generation attending college, with only 10 percent, down from 13 percent last year.

Powell said the same type of students accepted in the early decision cycle would be accepted during the regular cycle. Powell said, “Every early decision student who was admitted is exceptional, and would have been admitted in our regular decision round.” The same can be same for the rest of students admitted to the other Ivy League universities this past week. On Tuesday, Dec. 12, Harvard University admitted just 964 students out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college.

Earlier on Wednesday, Princeton University sent out early action admissionoffers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022, out of a record 5,402 applications. Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted. Also on Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022, out of record number 7,074 applications, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent. Also on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale University notified the Class of 2022 their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, out of a record number 5,733 applications, with a 14.7 percent acceptance rate.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

 

 

Education December 14, 2017: Yale admits record low for early action admission to Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Yale University’s acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent. (Source: Yale University News)

On the last day of early admission decisions from the Ivy League students found out if they were accepted from their coveted school. On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications. The acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent.

Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. Yale admitted 1550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. In December, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle.

Of the record 5,733 applications, aside from the 842 accepted high school seniors, 55 percent of the applicants were deferred to the regular admission cycle, 29 percent were downright refused and “2 percent either withdrew or submitted incomplete forms.” Yale has a single-choice early action admission, meaning students can only apply to Yale in the early admission cycle, however it is non-binding and students have until May 1 to notify Yale of their decision.

Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan made a statement to the college’s student paper the Yale Daily News. Quinlan commented on the incoming class, saying, “The Admissions Committee was very impressed with this year’s early applicant pool across every dimension. We are pleased to offer admission to this first group of students in the Class of 2022, and look forward to admitting a much larger group of students through our Regular Decision process this spring.”

Quinlan also commented that Yale is continuing their trend to increase the number of students admitted due to the new residential colleges. The Dean of Admissions said, “The addition of Benjamin Franklin and Pauli Murray colleges enables us to bring to Yale more students from a more diverse collection of backgrounds. The combination of expanding enrollment and greater representation of students from under-resourced backgrounds means more opportunity for more students.”

Yale provided very little information about the pool of those accepted to early action. Director of Outreach and Communications Mark Dunn only commented in November about the applications to early action admission. Dunn said they included “virtually every subgroup of applicants that the admissions office tracks.” Yale has enhanced their financial packages for those coming from “lower-income backgrounds,” in an effort to increase diversity. Yale received applications from “49 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 98 foreign countries.” Dean of Admissions Quinlan wants the final Class of 2022 to be 1,550 students enrolled.

On Tuesday, Dec. 12, Harvard University admitted just 964 students out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college. Earlier on Wednesday, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022, out of a record 5,402 applications. Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted. Also on Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022, out of record number 7,074 applications, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 12, 2017: Harvard continues trend of accepting record low early admissions applicants to Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-12-17

Harvard is continuing the trend of accepting a record low percentage of applicants to early admissions. (Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

Harvard College shattered many high school seniors’ dreams admitting their one of their lowest rate of early admission applicants to the Class of 2022. Harvard is one of the first of the Ivy League universities to notify students if they were accepted for early admission. Harvard College notified students by email on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m. if they were accepted to the Class of 2022, rejected or waitlisted. Harvard admitted just 964 studentsout of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college, and the elite Stanford University only beats it in the country.

As has been the trend, Ivy League, and elite universities are becoming more selective, and their early action admission rates are falling after receiving a record number of applications. This year is no different if Harvard’s numbers are an indication the Ivy League and elite universities are continuing the trend and are on track for their most selective year as they choose the Class of 2022.

Although 964 lucky seniors were accepted to the holy grail of Ivy League universities, others were not as lucky. Among the remaining applicants, 73 percent or 4,882 students have another opportunity and they were deferred to the regular admission cycle. However, for 9.2 percent or 611 students the dream is over, they were outright rejected. There were an additional 173 students who did not properly complete their applications and they also have the opportunity to complete them for regular cycle consideration.

Harvard admitted nearly the same percentage of early applicants as last year a 14.53 acceptance rate this year versus a 14.49 percent rate last year an addition of less than a half percentage point. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021. Their admissions represented just 14.5 percent of the applicant pool down only 0.3 percent from 2015. In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate.

William R. Fitzsimmons, the dean of admissions and financial aid, commented to student paper The Harvard Crimson on the record number of early admissions’ applicants for the Class of 2022. Fitzsimmons expressed, “The one thing we can say with certainty is that the numbers rose this year. In general terms, it appears that more institutions had increases than the reverse… Early admission, in one form or another, is the new normal.”

Harvard’s Class of 2022 is even more diverse than last year, partially due to legal scrutiny. More minorities were admitted with 13.9 percent of early African-American applicants being accepted up from 12.6 percent of were admitted last year. This year saw a slight rise in Hispanic students accepted with 9.8 percent, up from 9.5 percent last year. Native American and Native Hawaiian applicants made in-roads with 1.8 percent accepted early up from last year’s paltry 1.1 percent. Of all groups, women saw their numbers decrease down one percent from 48 percent to 47 percent.

The minority group with the largest early acceptance rate was Asian-Americans with 24.2 percent accepted this year up from 21.1 percent in last year’s early admissions cycle. Harvard is facing an investigation into their admission rates of Asian Americans by the Department of Justice and a private lawsuit by former applicants. The DOJ began investigating Harvard’s affirmative action practices this past summer. The DOJ wanted the college to hand over is applications and student records and threatened to sue if they would not comply with Dec. 1. The DOJ is now contemplating Harvard’s counteroffer to allow the review of redacted student records

Harvard is also facing a separate private lawsuit by rejected Asian American applicants, who are accusing the college of discriminatory admission practices. The lawsuit is ongoing from 2014 where the college was accused of “employing racially and ethnically discriminatory policies” and that “Harvard’s undergraduate admissions policies and procedures have injured and continue to injure Plaintiff’s members by intentionally and improperly discriminating against them on the basis of their race and ethnicity in violation of Title VI.” The college is providing hundreds of thousands of former applications to comply with that lawsuit.

Harvard is also making an effort to accept more economically disadvantaged students. Among those admitted to early admission, 58 percent are asking for financial aid, and 13 percent needed application fee waivers, while last year only 10.7 percent made that request. More First-generation college students were admitted with 10.6 percent to the Class of 2022 up from 8.7 percent for the Class of 2021. Despite concerns about attracting international students, the rate admitted remains steady with 10.2 percent, and 2.3 percent from northern neighbor Canada.

Fitzsimmons noted early admissions usually see less diversity, but this year was an exception. Fitzsimmons told the Crimson, “Traditionally, early programs have tended not to reflect the excellence and diversity that you see out in the world, so one of the real pushes over the past decade or so-and part of it was giving it up and then bringing it back-is to make certain that people from all of those backgrounds do consider early. We’re delighted to see that we had greater economic and ethnic diversity not just in the pool, but in the admitted group.”

For the Class of 2022, Harvard intends to admit fewer students than to the Class of 2021. Fitzsimmons cited overcrowding in the Class of 2021 freshman as the reason for accepting fewer students this upcoming year. For the Class of 2021 much, more students accepted admission offers, leading to “twenty-eight freshmen living in DeWolfe, overflow housing typically reserved for upperclassmen.” The Dean of Admissions wants to admit also students off the waitlist this year. Last year they were unable to able to accept any students off the list. Fitzsimmons said in September his goal to accept “40 to 50 to maybe 100 people” off the waitlist. Now the Dean of Admissions says the college “will certainly be mindful of coming in on target” when it deciding admissions in the regular cycle.

Early decision is binding, meaning a student who applies and then is accepted is required to attend the university or college, while early action is non-binding, a student can be accepted and then decide against going to that particular school and can turn down their admission offer. Applying for early admission is not without its risks either, some schools have policies where if a student is rejected in the early admission cycle, cannot reapply for regular admission, however, some universities who do not accept students that applied for early admission, automatically consider them for regular admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education October 29, 2017: Harvard tops US News 2018 Best Global Universities

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Harvard tops US News 2018 Best Global Universities

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

This was Harvard’s year, the oldest Ivy League university reigns over another ranking US News and World Report’s fourth annual Best Global Universities Rankings. Harvard.edu

Harvard University remains the top university in the world according to the US News and World Report’s fourth annual Best Global Universities Rankings. US News released the 2018 ranking on Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. The biggest international university ranking looked at the best universities by “region, country, and subject” based on “academic research and reputation.” This year’s ranking again grew and increased the number of schools represented from 1000 to 1250 from 74 countries in the world up from 65, with each one receiving a score out of 100.

The top four overall remains the same as last year, but a lot more movement in the rest of the top ten with three new entries. As for the rest of the top three, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) remained second, and Stanford University remains third. The top public school on the list the University of California-Berkeley remains at fourth. Rounding out the top five is the best school outside of the US, the University of Oxford, which is back up to fifth place after a year hiatus.

In the second half of the top ten, the California Institute of Technology, Caltech moved down one to number six. The number two British university the University of Cambridge remains in the seventh spot. Columbia University moves up to eighth place switching with Princeton University, who moves down one to ninth. The tenth spot is busy this year with three universities entering the top 10 at that spot. Johns Hopkins University, the University of Washington, and Yale University are all tied for tenth place. The University of Washington replaces top ten departing the University of California-Los Angeles as the second-placed public school at the top of the ranking.

American universities dominated the entire ranking as they did the top 10 with 221 institutions, followed by China with 136 schools and Japan with 76 schools represented continuing the rise of Asian schools. The UK fell to fourth place with 73 schools, in continental Europe Germany had 58 institutions in the ranking. The United Kingdom is the only country to pierce the top ten universities with Oxford University at №5 and the University of Cambridge at №7.

Robert Morse, chief data strategist at U.S. News, explained the reason behind American domination, “The schools that rank the highest in the Best Global Universities rankings are those that emphasize academic research, including by partnering with international scholars to produce highly cited articles. This is different from the Best Colleges rankings, which measure the overall quality of undergraduate institutions in the U.S. and focus on student outcomes such as graduation and retention rates.”

Meanwhile, Anita Narayan, managing editor of Education at U.S. News commented on the ranking. Narayan expressed, “For more than 30 years, U.S. News has been committed to making higher education data more accessible to prospective students choosing a U.S. university. The Best Global Universities rankings similarly allow consumers to accurately evaluate and compare international schools to find the right fit for them, based on available data.”

The first university that made the list outside of the US and the UK was Canada with the University of Toronto at №20 up from 21 last year. The University of British Columbia came in second as it has been for most of this year’s international lists at №27 up from 31 last year, followed by McGill University in third who also climbed up, but just one to 49 from 50th place last year.

US News’ global universities list covers five regions including African universities. US News’ added to their country-specific rankings four additional countries moving the number up from 38 to 42. The countries added were Argentina, Mexico, Pakistan, and Romania. Among the regions, most of the universities from last year remained their region’s top school with one exception. The University of Oxford is the top school in Europe.

The top European university outside of the UK is the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich at number 25 up from 35 last year. In Oceania, the University of Melbourne in Australia took the highest spot for that area at №26 up from 36. The Universidade de São Paulo in Brazil is the best in Latin America, and the top school in Africa is the University of Cape Town. The only change was in Asia, where the National University of Singapore replaced the University of Tokyo as the top school coming at №43.

The ranking also includes subject rankings looking at the top school for research in the field solely. There are 22 subject rankings in all. The subject rankings are dominated by STEM subjects; science, technology, engineering and mathematics with the addition of the arts and humanities. The US again dominates the subject rankings, topping the lists in all but six subjects. The six subjects the US does not rank first are computer science, engineering, mathematics, agricultural sciences, materials science, and arts and humanities. Harvard excels in the most subject fields, with 11; other multiple toppers include the University of California — Berkeley and China’s Tsinghua University both with two subjects.

China is moving up with Tsinghua University replacing MIT in the computer science ranking and tops the engineering field in research. The methodology for the subject rankings differs from the university rankings because it looks at academic research in the individual subject. The subject rankings have more schools represented, 125 that are not included in the university rankings. Additionally, 600 schools, 200 more from last year were included in the subjects of chemistry, clinical medicine, engineering, and physics.

US News utilizes data from Clarivate Analytics InCitesTM research analytics solutions, and citations data taken from the Web of Science database. The data “measures a university’s global and regional reputation; academic research performance using bibliometric indicators such as publications, citations and international collaboration; and school-level data on faculty and Ph.D. graduates.” Last year US News’ altered their methodology “to further emphasize excellence in academic research by factoring in the total number of highly cited papers in the top 1 percent of their respective fields and the percentage of a university’s total papers that are among the top 1 percent of most-cited papers.” This year US News again changed their methodology giving marks for universities where their professors collaborated with professors from other countries in authoring research articles.

U.S. News 2018 Best Global Universities Rankings top 10:

Overall Best Global Universities

1. Harvard University (U.S.) (1)
2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (U.S.) (2)
3. Stanford University (U.S.) (3)
4. University of California-Berkeley (U.S.) (4)
5. University of Oxford (U.K.) (6)
6. California Institute of Technology (U.S.) (5)
7. University of Cambridge (U.K.) (7)
8. Columbia University (U.S.) (9)
9. Princeton University (U.S.) (8)
10. Johns Hopkins University (U.S.) (tie)
10. University of Washington (U.S.) (tie)
10. Yale University (U.S.) (tie)

Subject Rankings

Agricultural Sciences: Wageningen University and Research Center Netherlands (88 tied)
Arts and Humanities: University of Oxford United Kingdom (5)
Biology and Biochemistry: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Chemistry: University of California — Berkeley United States Berkeley, CA (4)
Clinical Medicine: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Computer Science: Tsinghua University China Beijing (64)
Economics and Business: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Engineering: Tsinghua University China Beijing (64)
Environment/Ecology: University of California — Berkeley United States Berkeley, CA (4)
Geosciences: California Institute of Technology United States Pasadena, CA (6)
Immunology: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Materials Science: Nanyang Technological University Singapore (55)
Mathematics: Pierre and Marie Curie University France Paris (38)
Microbiology: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Molecular Biology and Genetics: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Neuroscience and Behavior: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Pharmacology and Toxicology: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Physics: Massachusetts Institute of Technology United States Cambridge, MA (2)
Plant and Animal Science: University of California — Davis United States Davis, CA (52)
Psychiatry/Psychology: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Social Sciences and Public Health: Harvard University United States Cambridge, MA (1)
Space Science: California Institute of Technology United States Pasadena, CA (6)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education September 27, 2017: Harvard tops the 2018 Wall Street Journal, Times Higher Education second annual US college ranking

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Harvard tops the 2018 Wall Street Journal, Times Higher Education second annual US college ranking

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Harvard University is replacing the country’s most selective university Stanford as the nation’s top university and is again regaining the preeminent top position in the public’s eyes. Wikipedia Commons 

Another ranking has returned America’s crown jewel Harvard University to the top of university rankings charts. In their second edition, The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education college rankings named Harvard University their best college beating out last year’s school Stanford University as the rivalry between the two most selective universities in the country continues in this year’s ranking season. WSJ and THE released their second annual joint ranking of American colleges on Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017. The top ten included some of the country’s most elite universities including six belonging to the Ivy League. Harvard is regaining control in national rankings also topping Forbes American Top College in 2017 for the first time.

Besides Harvard, there are six other schools in the Northeast in the top ten including five more from the Ivy League. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and ivies Columbia, Yale, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton and Cornell reign the top ten. Only three schools outside the elite location made the top ten including two from California, Stanford, the California Institute of Technology and North Carolina’s Duke University representing the South. Harvard gained ground in the engagement and environment categories boosting it back to the top of the rankings. Stanford lost ground and first place in the resources and outcomes categories.

The top ten has changed around drastically since the WSJ/THE Inaugural ranking with Harvard moving up from second place to number one and former top school Stanford slides to third place. In second is Columbia University who moves up from fifth, three spots to second place. Stanford does not have the third place alone it shares it with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who moves down one from last year. Rounding out the top five is Duke University moving up two to the fifth spot.

In the second half of the top ten Yale University remains in the sixth place. The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) is the only new school in the top ten moving up five spots from 12 to seventh place. The University of Pennsylvania moves down four to eighth place. US News and World Report’s Best College Princeton University remains at the ninth place. Cornell University completes the top ten moving down two spots. Last year’s tenth place school Northwestern University moved out of the top ten tumbling to number 15 in the ranking.

The majority of the schools in the top 30 are private, as well as the entire top 10. The only public schools in the top 30 are the University of California-Los Angeles, which is the top ranking public school this year coming in at №25 and last year’s top public school the University of Michigan at №27. UCLA moved up three from №28 last year, while Michigan moves down five from №22. Rounding out the top three public schools are the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill falling three out of the top 30 to №33.

Public schools in general did not fare well in the rankings with 80 out of the bottom 100 being public universities. Phil Baty, Editorial Director, Global Rankings, Times Higher Education sees this as a “serious” problem in the US, “The fact that there are only two publics in the top 30 is part of the narrative that there is a crisis in public higher education. We are seeing some real challenges in terms of resources, and I think this kind of inequality, this defunding of great American public schools, is a serious issue.” This issue is important because public schools are the ones accepting more racially and socioeconomically diverse students than private colleges, particularly the California state system. As Baty notes, “It’s an incredible story of access. But again, the schools with the greatest access are starved of funds. The privates are less inclusive.”

The WSJ/THE ranking is one of the many rankings that now focuses heavily on the outcomes of getting a degree from one the institutions on their list, as Return on Investment (ROI) takes center stage in more rankings. This year WSJ emphasized their ranking examines “how well a college will prepare students for life after graduation.” What sets the WSJ/ THE ranking apart is the survey that asks “the extent to which they felt engaged in their education.” Last year, 10,000 participated in the survey, this year, 109,000 were involved.

The methodology includes four main categories and 15 individual factors. WSJ explains the methodology’s marking system, “40 per cent of each school’s overall score comes from student outcomes, including a measure of graduate salaries, 30 per cent from the school’s academic resources, 20 per cent from how well it engages its students and 10 per cent from the diversity of its students and staff.”

Some factors included in the ranking are the “salaries of graduates and debt repayment rates, school reputation, research impact, and how much a college spends to educate each student.” According to the WSJ, colleges are specifically marked on the following categories “alumni earnings, debt burdens, student engagement, resources, diversity of students and faculty, and academic reputation.” This year WSJ/THE added a new factor, “graduates’ ability to repay student debt” in their methodology under the outcomes category. Over 1,000 colleges were included in the ranking.

Expanding from last year, the WSJ/THE has six other rankings in addition to their overall ranking. They include “The Best Public Colleges in the U.S., The Colleges Whose Graduates Do Best Financially, Colleges Where Students Are Most Inspired by Their Peers, Colleges Where Students Feel Challenged, Public Universities Do Best When It Comes to Diversity, and Colleges That Prioritize Internships.”

UCLA, Michigan, and UNC are the top public colleges. California is tops when it comes to top most diverse students with La Sierra University on the top and seven California public schools in the top 12. Students are the most challenged at Dordt College in Iowa and Texas Christian University. While Kettering University, Endicott College are the top schools That Prioritize Internships preparing their students for work after college. The Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, however, is the top school for elevating income for graduates, while Harvard and Duke are the best universities for graduates to do best financially overall.

The rankings are based on specific categories, Resources, Student Outcomes, Engagement, and Environment. The top results like last year are a mix of private Ivy League and private universities, and small little-known public colleges. Harvard University remains first when it comes to Resources. There was a new number one in the Student Outcomes category with Yale University out and Harvard and Duke vying and tying for first. The outcomes category most mirrors the overall top ten with most of the universities appearing in the lists top 11 with one addition, Williams College tied for ninth, but came in at №22 overall.

The Ivy League schools did not dominate the entire ranking with public schools outweighing them in two categories, Engagement and Environment. For a second year, Dordt College is the top school in Engagement, but was only №393 overall in the ranking. La Sierra University is still the best school for Environment although it does not even rank in the top 600. Environment examines whether a school is racially and socioeconomically diverse but also looks at “staff and the proportion of international students.” Ironically, none of the schools in the top five even made the Environment category’s top 50.

Dave Pettit, Editor of Specialized News Products, The Wall Street Journal discussed this year’s ranking in the press release. Pettit explained, “With so many schools to choose from and countless factors to consider, selecting the right college requires careful consideration and a lot of research. The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings are designed to help make the selection process easier and less intimidating.”

Baty, Editorial Director, Global Rankings, at the Times Higher Education commented, on what makes their ranking unique. Baty said, “In our first year, the Journal and THE were lauded for shaking up U.S. rankings. Unlike traditional competitors, we have built these rankings around a huge survey based on 200,000 current student voices, giving us a student’s eye view of teaching, learning, and life on campus. It gives a rounded and practical understanding of the strengths of individual institutions and the lifelong value of a degree.”

The WSJ/THE were quick to address the differences between their ranking and US News and World Report’s flagship ranking of American colleges and universities, specifically the discrepancies between their positioning of universities. The most noticeable difference is Princeton, who has topped US News’ ranking for several years, but was only number nine in the WSJ/THE ranking, because their engagement rank was a disappointing number 533.

The main reason for the differences all amounts to the methodologies each ranking uses to calculate national position. Carnegie Mellon, who came in at number 20, but number 25 under US News summed up well the reasons for the differences and the problems with rankings in a statement. The statement read, “Some rankings are designed purely for entertainment, little more than internet photo galleries. Others make a more serious effort at collecting information. Even where rankings do collect objective statistics such as test scores or costs, the choice of which factors to include in a ranking, and how those factors are weighted, remains subjective.”

WSJ/THE US College Rankings 2018 top 10:

1. Harvard University (6)
2. Columbia University (5)
3. Stanford University (1)
3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (tie) (2)
5. Duke University (7)
6. Yale University (6)
7. California Institute of Technology (12)
8. University of Pennsylvania (4)
9. Princeton University (9)
10. Cornell University (8)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

September 4, 2017: Harvard remains on top of the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) for 2017–18

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Harvard remains on top of the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) for 2017–18

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Harvard University is the world’s best university and at the top of the most academic fields according to Shanghai Rankings’2017 edition of the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) and Global Ranking of Academic Subjects (GRAS). Wikipedia Commons

Early in the college ranking season and Harvard University is dominating as the best school nationally and internationally. The Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) released their annual ranking on Aug. 15, 2017, with Harvard University again topping the best 800 universities in the world for the 15th year. Harvard also tops the Global Ranking of Academic Subjects (GRAS) 2017 released earlier this summer on June 28. On the GRAS ranking of 52 subjects, Harvard dominates and is the best university for 15 subjects. The ARWU is one of only two major rankings that are not published by a western country in either the United States or the United Kingdom. Shanghai Ranking Consultancy compiles ARWU in China.

For the 15th straight year, Harvard University topped the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU)’s list. The top ten’s schools are unchanged from last year’s rankings and consist of eight American universities and two British institutions, but they moved around in their ranking. The world ranking also includes the national ranks for each school represented on the list.

Stanford University remains in second place, The United Kingdom’s top school, the University of Cambridge, moves up one to third place. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology moves up one to fourth place. The University of California Berkeley is again the top public school in the ranking. UC Berkley rounds out the top five moving down from third to fifth place.

In the second half of the top ten, Princeton is only the other university to maintain its spot, staying in sixth place for the past three years. The University of Oxford remains for the second year stagnated in the seventh spot. Columbia University, the third Ivy League university in the ranking behind Harvard and Princeton moves up one to eighth place. While the California Institute of Technology, Caltech moved down one to ninth place. The University of Chicago completes the top ten holding the same spot for the last two years.

The top ranking university in continental Europe is ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) remaining in 19th place. Denmark’s University of Copenhagen remains at 30th maintaining the spot as Continental Europe’s second best university, while France’s Pierre & Marie Curie University stays at third place in Europe, but moves down to the 40th place overall.

The list includes a rising number of Asian universities with The University of Tokyo as the top Asian university on the list, but moves out of the top 20, down four to the 24th position. Australia’s the University of Melbourne is the top university in the Oceania region and moves up to 39th place. Israel’s universities nose-dived this year. The Israel Institute of Technology (Technion) remains Israel’s top school, but its ranking dived from 67 down 26 places to number 93, barely staying in the top 100. While Hebrew University continues its slide from 87 to the unranked 100–150 position in the list.

The top Canadian university is the University of Toronto moving up four to 23rd place, making Canada the fourth top ranking country on the list. The University of British Columbia moved up three top the 31st spot and second in Canada. This year Canada has a new university in third McMaster University moves in the spot long held by Canadian ranking’s top school, McGill University. McMaster moved up an impressive 17 places and now sits in the 66th spot. McGill moved down three spots to 67th place. McMaster’s move changes Canada’s top internationally ranked universities, which have always been the big three of U of T, UBC, and McGill in various orders.

The United States dominates the ranking as it does with all the global lists, with 48 universities in the top 100, and 16 schools alone in the top 20 and 135 universities in the entire ranking. The United Kingdom loses their second place in the number of universities represented to China, part of the trend in the rise in prominence of Asian schools. China now has “57 universities in the top 500” while the UK only has 38. Although Asian schools have been rising the rankings, their preeminent turn in the ARWU rankings might have to do with the rankings parent company being set in China.

Brexit has been affecting British schools in the rankings and with applications and enrollment. The UK retains their second place when it comes to the number of schools in the top 100 with nine universities and Australia is third in the top 100 with six schools and 23 overall. There are 18 universities appearing in the ranking for the first time, while only five schools broke into the top 100 first time, including “Erasmus University in Netherlands and Cardiff University in the United Kingdom.” This year the ranking increased from 500 universities to ranking 800 schools worldwide.

ARWU is primarily based on scientific research to determine the ranking, and its subject rankings heavily look at the sciences except for the social sciences and economics. The Academic Ranking of World Universities methodology solely relies on Clarivate Analytics (formerly Thomson Reuters), and based the ranking of the universities by the most “highly cited researchers.” The Clarivate Analytics is “updated annually using a 10-year performance window.” Most of the citations are scientific research explaining why Asian universities are rapidly excelling versus universities such as those in the UK that emphasize the humanities.

According to Shanghai Ranking their methodology uses six indicators, “including the number of alumni and staff winning Nobel Prizes and Fields Medals, the number of Highly Cited Researchers, the number of articles published in journals of Nature and Science, the number of articles indexed in Science Citation Index — Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index, and per capita performance.”

ShanghaiRanking Global Ranking of Academic Subjects (GRAS) compromises lists ranking 52 subjects in five fields “natural sciences, engineering, life sciences, medical sciences and social sciences.” The socials sciences include more business related subjects than actual social science disciplines. Like the ARWU, the emphasis is on the sciences with the social sciences taking a back burner and the humanities entirely omitted. It should not be a surprise to see in the GRAS Harvard is again the big winner topping 15 subjects. Harvard excels in the social sciences and earned top marks for seven social sciences disciplines including law and only four within the medical sciences. Harvard also tops Library and Information Science despite not having a program offering degrees in the field.

The US again dominates the GRAS rankings taking honors in 32 out of the 52 subjects. Second in the ranking is China with eight subjects followed by the Netherlands helming five subjects. The UK only tops three subjects, “geography (University of Oxford), ecology (University of Oxford) and mechanical engineering (University of Cambridge).” In the US, second to Harvard is MIT, who has honors in five subjects, including four in engineering fields.

Stanford, which is second in the ARWU ranking, only tops two subjects Environmental Science and Engineering and Education. Among the other American schools, topping two subjects are the University of Pennsylvania (Nursing and Business Administration) and the University of California, Berkeley (Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Chemistry) with the best public school showing again.

Universities outside the US appearing multiple times are Britain’s Oxford (geography and ecology), the Netherlands’ Delft University of Technology (Water Resources and Transportation Science and Technology), and the University of Wageningen (Agricultural Sciences and Food Science & Technology) which is another school from the Netherlands. Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University is the only Asian school to top two subjects (Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Energy Science and Engineering).

The GRAS includes “1400 universities from 80 countries” in the 52 lists. As for frequency, American schools “appear 3857 times, followed by Chinese universities (1652 times) and universities from the United Kingdom (1168 times).” The two schools that appear the most in the subject rankings are “The Ohio State University — Columbus and the University of New South Wales.”

Like the ARWU, GRAS relies heavily on citations as their ranking methodology. To determine the lists Shanghai Ranking looks at “the number of papers authored by an institution in an academic subject, international collaboration on papers, and the number of staff winning awards in an academic subject.” According to Shanghai Ranking, they “measure” “research productivity, research quality, the extent of international collaboration, research with top quality, and the highest academic recognitions.” The ranking uses bibliometric data from Clarivate Analytics’ Web of Science and InCites. To determine Award winners Shanghai Ranking utilizes the Academic Excellence Survey.

The Academic Ranking of World Universities compromises of three different separate rankings; World Top 800 Universities; World Top 200 Universities in Broad Subject Fields, and World Top 200 Universities by Subject Fields. Shanghai Ranking Consultancy has been publishing the list since 2003.

Academic Ranking of World Universities ARWU’s top 10 world universities:

1 (1) Harvard University USA
2 (2) Stanford University USA
3 (4) University of Cambridge UK
4 (5) Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) USA
5 (3) University of California, Berkeley USA
6 (6) Princeton University USA
7 (7) University of Oxford UK
8 (9) Columbia University USA
9 (8) California Institute of Technology USA
10 (10) University of Chicago USA

Global Ranking of Academic Subjects (GRAS) 2017 52 subjects:

Natural Sciences
Mathematics Princeton University USA
Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) USA
Chemistry University of California, Berkeley USA
Earth Sciences Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Switzerland
Geography University of Oxford UK
Ecology University of Oxford UK

Engineering
Mechanical Engineering University of Cambridge UK
Electrical & Electronic Engineering University of California, Berkeley USA
Automation & Control Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) USA
Telecommunication Engineering Tsinghua University China
Instruments Science & Technology Harbin Institute of Technology China
Biomedical Engineering Harvard University USA
Computer Science & Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) USA
Civil Engineering Tongji University China
Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) USA
Materials Science & Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) USA
Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Nanyang Technological University Singapore
Energy Science & Engineering Nanyang Technological University Singapore
Environmental Science & Engineering Stanford University USA
Water Resources Delft University of Technology Netherlands
Food Science & Technology University of Wageningen Netherlands
Biotechnology Harvard University USA
Aerospace Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology USA
Marine/Ocean Engineering Shanghai Jiao Tong University China
Transportation Science & Technology Delft University of Technology Netherlands
Remote Sensing Wuhan University China
Mining & Mineral Engineering University of Science and Technology Beijing China Metallurgical Engineering Central South University China

Life Sciences
Biological Sciences Harvard University USA
Human Biological Sciences Harvard University USA
Agricultural Sciences University of Wageningen Netherlands
Veterinary Sciences Ghent University Belgium

Medical Sciences
Clinical Medicine Harvard University USA
Public Health Harvard University USA
Dentistry & Oral Sciences University of Michigan-Ann Arbor USA
Nursing University of Pennsylvania USA
Medical Technology Harvard University USA
Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences Harvard University USA

Social Sciences
Economics University of Chicago USA
Statistics Harvard University USA
Law Harvard University USA
Political Sciences Harvard University USA
Sociology Harvard University USA
Education Stanford University USA
Communication The Ohio State University — Columbus USA
Psychology Harvard University USA
Business Administration University of Pennsylvania USA
Finance New York University USA
Management Harvard University USA
Public Administration Erasmus University Netherlands
Hospitality & Tourism Management The Hong Kong Polytechnic University China-Hong Kong Library & Information Science Harvard University USA

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education August 25, 2017: Malia Obama officially moves in to Harvard University freshmen dorms

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EDUCATION

Malia Obama officially moves in to Harvard University freshmen dorms

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Photo: B Scott / @lovebscott Twitter

Former President Barack Obama’s eldest daughter Malia Obama officiallyjoined Harvard University’s Class of 2021. On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, Malia moved into Harvard’s freshmen dorms. The former president and first lady Michele Obama helped their daughter move into her dorm in Yards reserved for freshman. The move was low key, with Malia looking to fit in rather than outshine her fellow classmates. Former President Obama and First Lady Michelle were seen helping their daughter with boxes and leaving her dorm building after Malia was settled in. The president was spotted the same day at Harvest restaurant in Harvard Square.

Malia is Harvard legacy both the president and first lady attended Harvard Law School in the late 1980s and early 1990s, where the president made history as the first African American Harvard Law Review editor. The country’s most prestigious and oldest college was home to many famous alumni, including eight former presidents and a number presidential children including two that went on to become president, John Quincy Adams, and George W. Bush. Malia will hardly be the only famous Harvard freshmen on campus this year, actress Yara Shahidi is also attending, and even received a letter of recommendation from the former first lady. Shahidi stars in ABC’s “Black-ish” but deferred enrollment until 2018 while she films the spin off “Adult-ish.”

Last year, the Obamas said they did not press their daughter to attend an Ivy League university. Former President Obama relayed they told Malia, “I don’t want them to think, ‘Oh I should go to these top schools.’ We live in a country where there are thousands of amazing universities. So, the question is: What’s going to work for you?” The president advised his daughter “not to stress too much” and reminded her “Just because it’s not some name-brand, famous, fancy school doesn’t mean that you’re not going to get a great education there.” In the end, Malia opted for the Ivy League crown jewel that tops national and international university rankings.

The former first daughter, 19 graduated high school in 2016 and was accepted that year but decided to take a gap year. In the past year, her father left office, her family moved out of the White House. In the fall, Malia went on a trip to Bolivia and Peru, the Boulder, Colo. company Where There Be Dragons that specializes in gap year and summer programs. Since her father left office, she interned at the Weinstein Company, attended the Sundance Film Festival, protested the Dakota Access pipeline project and vacationed in Aspen, Colorado. Malia then spent her summer on family vacations in Bali and Martha’s Vineyard and rocked out at Chicago’s Lollapalooza.

Malia has shown an interest in film, having had two other internships on television shows. In summer 2014, Malia was a production assistant for CBS’ now cancelled sci-fi series “Extant” starring Halle Berry, and in the summer of 2015, Malia interned on Lena Dunham’s HBO series Girls. Her interests are sparking speculation as to what her major or concentration would be while at Harvard.

Boston Globe reporter Steve Annear attempted to score an interview and approached Obama’s eldest daughter. Malia “declined” the interview, and explained “I can’t,” but as Annear recounted she “politely returned a handshake.” Tuesday, Aug. 22 was Harvard’s official move-in day for freshmen, but students who needed to were allowed “to move in a day early, based on travel schedules, athletic schedules, or other needs.” Freshmen orientations began on Tuesday, while classes start on Aug. 30. Annear was the only one who approached the former first daughter for her celebrity; instead, she appeared speaking with fellow freshmen.

Still, Twitter was filled with tweets from her classmates broadcasting Malia sightings and catching photos of her parents on campus. One student went overboard on Twitter with her excitement as she saw her brother chatting with Malia, posting a couple of tweets and a photo declaring “My brother and Malia are about to be besties,” facing a backlash the student deleted her tweets.

During Malia’s senior year, President Obama told Ellen DeGeneres, “Malia is more than ready to leave, but I’m not ready for her to leave.” When asked about speaking at her graduation, the then president replied, “Malia’s school asked if I wanted to speak at commencement and I said ‘Absolutely not.’ I’m going to be wearing dark glasses, sobbing.” Both the former president and first lady were spotted leaving Malia’s dorm wearing sunglasses although it was dark outside, attempting to cover their emotions at dropping off their first born at college.

Related: Malia Obama to join Harvard’s Class of 2021 in fall 2017 after gap year

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education August 10, 2017: Harvard University tops Forbes America’s Top College 2017 for the first time

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EDUCATION

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

In their tenth annual ranking of America’s Top 100 Colleges 2018 Forbes finally crowned America’s most coveted and oldest university handing Harvard University their first top spot on the ranking. Wikipedia Commons

There is a new king on the top of Forbes Magazine national ranking of American colleges and universities. On August 2, 2017, Forbes released their tenth annual ranking of America’s Top 100 Colleges finally crowning America’s most coveted and oldest university, Harvard University in the top spot. This year’s top public school is the United States Naval Academy, while the University of California, Berkeley is the top public school non-military. The ranking heavily relies on return on investment with the subheading the 600+ schools worth the investment. The ranking looks at the top colleges but also includes separate lists for Top Public and Private Colleges as well as top colleges in the country’s four regions.

This year’s overall top three represents high school seniors’ university wish list with Harvard number one, followed by last year’s top college Stanford in second and Yale University in third. As Forbes pointed out, Harvard “is the gold standard of American higher education” and it finally “lives up to its reputation and tops the list as the best in the U.S.” Harvard does the best when it comes to the rubrics Forbes uses. Forbes indicates that 87% graduate” in four years and 97% in six years.” Harvard graduates have a “mid-career median salary of $123,000 and a median debt of some $7,500.”

The top ten radically changed from last year’s ranking with Ivy League and major prestigious research universities dominating. The nation’s most selective school Stanford drops from the top spot to second place. Yale moves three spots to the third position. Princeton University drops one place from third to fourth. Rounding out the top five is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which stagnates and remains at fifth. As for the rest the California Institute of Technology, Caltech moves up 33 spots to the top ten, placing in at sixth, as does the University of Pennsylvania into the top ten at seventh, and Duke University is also a new entry at eighth. Brown University is down one to nine while 2015 former top college Pomona moves down four from sixth to tenth.

Forbes also ranks separately, private and public colleges and the best amongst the country’s four regions, Northeast, South, Midwest, and West. The “gold standard” Harvard also tops the private colleges’ list, with “coveted” Stanford slipping to second place. As Forbes points out, Harvard and Stanford “are, undoubtedly, the two foremost universities in the country today and spar with each other for the finest students, professors and researchers.” Yale University is again third, followed by Princeton University in fourth, MIT in fifth and CalTech in sixth mirroring the top six in the overall top colleges ranking list. As for the rest of the top ten, the University of Pennsylvania is in seventh, followed by Duke University (8), Brown (9) and Pomona College in tenth.

The new top public school is the U.S. Naval Academy, beating the U.S. Military Academy, who has held the top spot since 2014, and now slips to second. The top non-military school is public university U.C. Berkeley at third. The public colleges top ten is divided almost evenly between military academies and flagship and research state schools. The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor move up to fourth place and surprisingly overtakes the University of Virginia, which slips to fifth. The U.S. Air Force Academy comes in at sixth falling three spots, the only military academy to do so. In seventh is the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, while eighth goes to the University of California-Los Angeles. In ninth is list newcomer the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, who last year was number 61. In tenth place is the “second oldest” college in the College of William and Mary.

The regional ranking with the highest median on “the overall FORBES Top Colleges list” is the Northeast where the Ivies reside. As Forbes highlights the region is “Home to many of the nation’s oldest and most renowned universities, the Northeast is an academic goldmine. The entire top ten is filled with Ivy League colleges and those Liberal Arts Colleges that belong to the little Ivies. Harvard is also perched atop the Northeast ranking, and with Stanford out of the mix, Yale moves up to second place, while Princeton moves up to third, followed by MIT in fourth and the University of Pennsylvania in fifth. Except for Williams College at the eighth spot, the rest of the top ten is filled with Ivies, Brown (6), Dartmouth College (7), Columbia University (9), and Cornell in tenth.

In the South, Duke University is again the top “Southern College,” after losing the title last year, by falling into second place. Four North Carolina schools in the top ten, but Virginia takes top honors with the most schools in the top 25. Duke is also the only southern school also appearing in the overall top ten. In second place is another private school, Rice University, “the Harvard of the South.” Another private school Vanderbilt University is in third. All three are in the overall top 30, with Rice at number 22 and Vanderbilt at 27. Private liberal arts college, Washington and Lee University is in fourth and Davidson College reaches the fifth spot. The University of Virginia comes in at sixth and is the top Southern public school and one of three in the top ten. As for the rest of the top ten, in seventh place is the College of William and Mary, in eighth is Wake Forest University. In the ninth spot is Emory University and in tenth place is the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

In the Midwest, the top college is the University of Chicago, who ranks at number 16 overall. It has been years since U of Chicago topped the Midwestern schools. Notre Dame University falls to second place after reigning the list in the past two years, Notre Dame is number 26 overall. The list represents a mix of top tier universities and liberal arts colleges, but the top ten only has two public schools represented. In third place is Northwestern University; followed by Washington University in St Louis in fourth and rounding out the top five is Carleton College. The highest-ranking public school is in sixth place with the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. In seventh place is Oberlin College, followed by Grinnell College (8) and Kenyon College (9). In tenth place is public school, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Stanford University dominates the Western schools, the country’s most selective university and most coveted tops the list by a long shot. The western rankings’ top three are all in the overall top ten, represent a mix of private, public top tier universities and private liberal arts, and STEM colleges. In second place is Caltech and Pomona College is third. In fourth place is Claremont McKenna College, and rounding out the top five is Harvey Mudd College. The top Western public school is the University of California, Berkeley at sixth place, followed by the topped ranked Western military college, the U.S. Air Force Academy in seventh. Scripps Colleges comes in the eighth spot, while University of Southern California (9) and the University of California, Los Angeles (10 complete the top ten.

In recent years, Liberal Arts Colleges dominated Forbes’s overall ranking, topping the list in 2014 with Williams College and in 2015 with Pomona College and keeping the top ten split with the Ivies up to last year. This year, only Pomona hangs on in the top ten, while the Ivies see the return to the spotlight along with the “highly selective private” universities. STEM and “research-oriented universities” are gaining in the ranking over Liberal Arts Colleges, notably with MIT and Caltech both entering the top ten. Military academies also do well in Forbes ranking with The U.S. Naval Academy surpassing usual top school the U.S. Military Academy for the last spot in the top 20. Forbes also notes bigger public universities are faring better than some of the smaller private schools. The Northeast “dominates” the top 25 with 17 colleges, while the West has five and the Midwest only has two colleges represented.

Forbes like US News weighs graduation and retention rates high in the listing’s methodology. Forbes grades each college on four categories “quality academics and student satisfaction, on-time graduation rates, low student debt and high earning potential and career success. These top ranking schools have the right combination of “age, location, endowment and low debt for students.” Like US News, Forbes is riding the wave of ranking the best value colleges, determining Return on Investment, ROI. Forbes worked with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) to determine “What are students getting out of college.”

Caroline Howard, “Digital Managing Editor, Forbes Media” commented on Forbes’ goals with the America’s Top Colleges ranking. Howard explained, “Before you become a college student, you need to think like a graduate. Our goal is to showcase the colleges and universities that deliver the best return on your education investment dollars: low student debt, on-time graduation, quality academics, high earning potential and career success.”

Forbes’s America’s Top Colleges’ overall top ten:
1. Harvard University (4)
2. Stanford University (1)
3. Yale University (6)
4. Princeton University (3)
5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (5)
6. California Institute of Technology (39)
7. University of Pennsylvania
8. Duke University
9. Brown University (8)
10. Pomona College (7)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education June 15, 2017: Harvard again tops Times Higher Education’s World Reputation Rankings for seventh-year

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EDUCATION

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The crown jewel of the Ivy League, Harvard University again is the world most prestigious university reputation wise. Photo: Harvard.edu 

When it comes to reputation, no university in the world can surpass Harvard, who is again the top university. On Thursday, June 14, 2017, The Times Higher Education released their seventh annual World Reputation Ranking with Harvard University remaining in the top spot for six years in a row. The top three are all American universities, with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the second place, and Stanford University in third. British universities round out the top five with the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford both tied for fourth place.

There was little movement in the top 10. There was one big change The University of Chicago moves up two into the top 10 and the ninth spot bumping out Ivy League Columbia University, which falls from ninth to 12th place. The only other change is the University of Oxford moves up to tie with fellow British school The University of Cambridge.

Otherwise, Harvard remains on top as Forbes points out, “Harvard can, as of this month, claim another distinction: the most reputable institution of higher learning on Earth-an honor it has enjoyed for the past six years.” For the six of the past seven years; MIT has been in second place. Eight of the top 10 were American universities, including Stanford University, Princeton University, Yale University, the University of California, Berkeley, the California Institute of Technology and new entry the University of Chicago.

The ranking is considered, “the definitive list of the world’s most prestigious universities.” Phil Baty, the rankings editor for THE, explains, “Reputation is the global currency of higher education. It may be subjective; it may not always be fair, but it matters deeply.” THE’s World Reputation Rankings “have become a major fixture in the higher education calendar — serving as a yearly global academic brand audit and attracting news headlines across the world.”

The ranking is international, with 19 countries represented in the top 100 universities. The United States has the most schools in the ranking but one less this year, with 42 institutions represented and Harvard the top ranking. American universities, however, are seeing a decline, with 20 schools falling in the ranking and only eight improving their positions. In the second place, the United Kingdom has the second most universities with 10, and the University of Cambridge and Oxford University tied at fourth, as the country’s the top school.

The THE is blaming Donald Trump being elected President of the United States and Brexit, for American and British schools losing prestige. THE rankings editor, Phil Baty pointed out about American institutions’ decline, “Claiming 42 places in the top 100 list (one fewer than last year), the US is the most-represented country in the table. But it will have to watch out for the rise of Asia as several of the continent’s higher education stars overtake well-established American powerhouses. Overall 20 of the U.S.’s 42 representatives have declined since last year and only eight have improved; the rest are stagnant.”

The other factor is the rise of Asian universities. The top Asian university is the University of Japan sitting at number 11, barely outside the top ten. There are also two other Asian schools in the top 20, China’s Tsinghua University and Peking University at the number 14 and 17 positions. Since 2011, Tsinghua moved up 21 spots, while Peking moved up 26 spots, both incredible leaps.

As THE indicates the University of Japan ranks higher than Ivy League Columbia University, and that Tsinghua University and Peking University are leading Imperial College London, the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University, two Ivy League universities and a prestigious British school. THE writer Ellie Bothwell comments in the press release, “China’s Tsinghua University and Peking University both leapfrogged the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University in the table this year while the University of Tokyo now has a stronger reputation than Columbia University. Meanwhile, Seoul National University is now considered more prestigious than the University of California, Davis.”

The three Asian universities fare better than any European institutions, where the top school ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich is only 22. European universities are also “losing ground” to Asian schools. China has six schools in the top 100 and Japan also has six ranking as does Germany, the European country with the most universities in the top 100. Both China and Japan had each one more school ranking in the top 100 than last year, while in 2015’s ranking, Japan and China had only two universities each in the top 100.

Canada has three universities in the top 100, with the University of Toronto, the country’s top school falls one to number 24. Meanwhile, the University of British Columbia is in second place in the country drops three spots to number 40. McGill University, which usually ranks as the top university in Canadian rankings, is only third in THE’s World Reputation Ranking of all Canadian schools, and also lost ground moving down three spots to tie for number 42 with the University of California, San Francisco, and LMU Munich.

The rankings are entirely based on the opinion of the institutions, as THE explains, “The rankings are entirely subjective — they are based purely on an annual opinion survey.” The methodology for determining the rankings consists of sending the survey to “more than 10,000 top scholars from around the world. Each academic was asked to name up to 15 universities that they believe are the best for research and teaching in their discipline. Votes for institutions based on research prowess were given twice the weight of those for teaching.”

THE’s Reputation Ranking mirrors THE’s World University Rankings in that most of the top 10 are the same but in vastly different spots. The biggest difference is that Yale University is included within the Reputation Ranking’s top 10, but misses it as 12th place in the World Ranking. While ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, which is number 9 in the world ranking is absent from the Reputation Ranking top 10 and does not even hit the top 20. The World Ranking is far more objective than the perception of reputation and relies on factors including “teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook.”

Top 10 World Reputation Rankings

2017 reputation rank — 2016 reputation rank — Institution Country — 2016–17 WUR position

1, 1 Harvard University, United States, 6
2, 2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States 5
3, 3 Stanford University, United States, 3
4, 4 University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, 4
4, 5 University of Oxford, United Kingdom, 1
6, 6 University of California, Berkeley, United States, 10
7, 7 Princeton University, United States, 7
8, 8 Yale University, United States, 12
9, 11 University of Chicago 10
10, 9 California Institute of Technology, United States, 2

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education July 9, 2017: Harvard and MIT the best universities for the highest earning majors

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EDUCATION

New guides to picking the best major at the best university

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The seventh annual QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017 had Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dominate the rankings as the leading universities for a combined 27 subjects including some of the highest earning majors. Wikipedia Commons

The college admission process seems to be preoccupied with university rankings catering to high school seniors choosing the best university they can be admitted to, but choosing a major is equally important if not more for success after graduation. While rankings look at the best universities, recent lists also look at the best majors and the leading universities to matriculate. Michigan State University’s Collegiate Employment Research Institute (CERI) released in October 2016 their 2016–17 Recruiting Trends, which looks at the starting salaries for each major, helping students identify the best moneymakers. QS Quacquarelli Symonds released in March 2017 their World University Rankings by Subject 2017 listing the preeminent universities for particular majors. The seventh annual list had Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dominate the rankings as the leading universities for a combined 27 majors.

The Michigan State University’s Collegiate Employment Research Institute annual recruiting trends lists the starting salaries of particular college degree majors from the associate level to the doctorate level emphasizing individual majors at the bachelor’s level. As Forbes explained, “Nearly 200 career service centers in the United States participated in the study and 4,350 employers provided information for the report, which includes data on full-time positions, internships, and co-op jobs.”

Forbes went further ranking these majors with the highest and lowest starting salaries. The vast majority of top earners are STEM, Science, Technology, Engineering and Medical degrees, particularly technology and engineering. Electrical engineering, software design, and chemical engineering are the top three degrees for highest starting salaries with graduates on average earning over $60,000 their first year on the job. Chemical Engineering was last year’s top earning degree.

Top ten highest starting salaries degrees:

1 Electrical Engineering: Average starting salary $62,428. Starting salary range $25,000 to #130,000
2 Software Design: Average starting salary $61,466. Starting salary range $25,000 to #134,000
3 Chemical Engineering: Average starting salary $61,125. Starting salary range $31,000 to #125,000
4 Computer Engineering: Average starting salary $61,092. Starting salary range $15,000 to #130,000
5 Mechanical Engineering: Average starting salary $59,610. Starting salary range $15,000 to #134,000
6 Computer Programming: Average starting salary $59,163. Starting salary range $15,000 to #130,000
7 Information Security Systems: Average starting salary $58,798. Starting salary range $19,000 to #123,000
8 Computer Science: Average starting salary $57,762. Starting salary range $15,000 to #130,000
9 Management Information Systems: Average starting salary $57,301. Starting salary range $15,000 to #122,000
10 Technical Engineering: Average starting salary $55,693. Starting salary range $15,000 to #132,000

While STEM majors dominate the highest earners, the Humanities, Social Sciences and Education have lowest earning starting salaries all earning less than $40,000 a year. Early Childhood Education has the lowest starting salary, followed by social work and then anthropology and sociology. Most of the humanities and social science majors listed as the bottom earners require graduate degrees for better positions and higher earnings.

Bottom ten lowest starting salaries degrees:
Pre-K & Kindergarten Education — $35,626
Social work — $37,115
Anthropology/Sociology — $37,672
Elementary education — $37,803
Special education — $38,002
Psychology — $38,079
English — $38,303
History — $38,361

In graduate and professional degrees, the same holds true STEM careers and graduate degrees reign supreme. Business including the coveted MBA and Law degrees are also high earners. Among the master’s degrees, the top three earners are computer science and engineering, as they are top earners at the undergraduate level. The Masters in Business Administration (MBA) comes in third, breaking up the undergraduate STEM monopoly. The top three all have starting salaries above $60,000 a year.

When it comes to doctorate and professional degrees STEM degrees and law dominate the top three, but this time a health science, pharmacy is the top earner. In second are computer science and engineering, while the law is third. The top three subject areas see starting salaries of $74,000 and above. The bottom end earners in the masters, doctoral and professional degrees are the social sciences and humanities subjects just as they were at the bachelor’s level. The only differences are the average starting salaries, at the masters level is just over 48,000, while at the doctoral level is over $58,000 a year, $20,000 more than just stopping at a degree at the bachelor’s level.

Master’s Degrees & MBAs

Computer science: $72,071 $15,000 — $145,000
Engineering: $69,729 $20,000 — $200,000
MBA: $62,700 $10,000 — $151,000
Physical & biological sciences: $59,204 $10,000 — $200,000
Accounting: $58,159 $10,000 — $144,000
LIR/HR: $58,125 $10,000 — $127,000
Health sciences: MS & MSW $53,283 $10,000 — $175,000
Social sciences: MA & MS $48,697 $10,000 — $150,000

PhD and Professional Degrees

Starting Salaries — PhD & Professional
Selected major Average Range
Pharmacy: $89,725 $20,000 — $146,000
Engineering & computer science: $77,811 $20,000 — $168,000
Law: $74,130 $20,000 — $200,000
Physical & biological sciences: $73,422 $20,000 — $141,000
Business: $67,578 $20,000 — $188,000
Social sciences & humanities: $58,897 $16,000 — $123,000

To complement the high-earning majors are the QS Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings by Subject 2017, which lets students know the best schools for their chosen major. QS World University Rankings’ annual list included the rankings for 46 subjects. Harvard was deemed the best university, landing on the top of the most subjects, and 15 majors. MIT came in a close second where they led the lists of 12 subjects. The results are a reversal to QS World University Rankings in 2017 and the latest for 2018, where MIT was the top ranking university for the last six years, whereas Harvard has remained in third place for the last two years. The University of Oxford is in third place topping the rankings of four subjects.

QS subject rankings not only lists the top majors, but also subject areas. MIT is the best school for high earning engineering and technology degrees followed by Stanford University in second and Cambridge in third. Harvard is the preeminent place for the Life Sciences & Medicine, Cambridge is second with Oxford third. MIT ranks as the leading school for the Natural Sciences, Cambridge is again second, while Harvard comes in at third. Harvard is again on the top as the leading university for the Social Sciences and Management. British schools again are the runner-ups with the London School of Economics (LSE) in second and Oxford third. For the Arts & Humanities, Oxford, the preeminent school for the classics is tops, followed by the University of Cambridge and Harvard in third.

The 46 subject rankings include “1127 universities from 74 countries” and are supposed to be “the most comprehensive global overview of higher education performance at discipline level.” This year QS added four additional subject rankings, “Anatomy & Physiology, Hospitality, Sports-related Subjects, and Theology, Divinity and Religious Studies.” There were only six subjects seeing new leaders this year notably as University World News indicates, “Mathematics, where MIT has taken over from the University of Cambridge, and history, where Harvard is the new leader.” Additionally, “development studies, the University of Sussex is now top, and archaeology, which is another of Oxford’s successes.”

The only school from continental Europe to top a subject list is ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology for the Earth and marine sciences, who currently the only European school in the top ten at ten in the 2018 World University Rankings. In Australasia, the University of Sydney tops the Sports-related subjects. Canada does not have a university leading any of the subjects, but McGill University, the number 32 in the World University Ranking is third in Anatomy. However, the University of Toronto, QS’ top Canadian university at number 31 for the world ranking did the best in Canada ranking in “the top ten for six subjects.” Eastern European schools are also faring better in the rankings particularly those from Russia.

The rise of Asian schools in world rankings continues with their positions in the subject rankings. Only one Asian school, however, the University of Hong Kong tops a subject list with Dentistry. Singapore has the most top 20 placements of all Asian countries. With the rise of Asian schools, there is a decline of American and British schools in the rankings, although American schools still dominate the top spots.

Ben Sowter, head of research at the QS Intelligence Unit, who also compiled the ranking, commented on the shift. Sowter noted, “We observe nations in both Eastern Europe and Asia — most notably Russia and China — increasing their overall share. However, the upper echelons of the tables remain dominated by the US and UK, and this seems likely to continue for the foreseeable future.” Sowter, however, pointed out, “It seems certain that Asia’s leading institutions will continue to strongly displace the second tier of North American and European institutions.”

As with their World University Rankings QS relied on citations and surveys to compile their subject rankings, which is based on three major indicators “academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact.” For the ranking QS used their data from Scopus, “the world’s largest database of research abstracts and citations.” To determine the leading universities in certain subjects 43 million academic research papers with 144 million citations were analyzed. Additionally, to determine the reputation component QS used 305,000 “survey responses” from academics and 194,000 from employers.

QS World Rankings by Subject 2017

Accounting & Finance — Harvard
Agriculture & Forestry — Wageningen University
Anatomy & Physiology — Oxford
Anthropology — Harvard
Archaeology — Oxford
Architecture — MIT
Art & Design- Royal College of Art
Biological Sciences — Harvard
Business & Management Studies — Harvard
Chemistry — MIT
Communication & Media Studies — University of Southern California
Computer Science & Information Systems — MIT
Dentistry — University of Hong Kong
Development Studies — University of Sussex
Earth & Marine Sciences- ETH Zurich
Economics & Econometrics — MIT
Education — UCL Institute of Education
Engineering — Chemical — MIT
Engineering — Civil & Structural — MIT
Engineering — Electrical — MIT
Engineering — Mechanical — MIT
Engineering — Mining & Mineral — Colorado School of Mines
English Language & Literature — Oxford
Environmental Sciences — University of California, Berkeley
Geography — Oxford
History — Harvard
Hospitality — University of Nevada
Law — Harvard
Linguistics — MIT
Materials Science — MIT
Mathematics — MIT
Medicine — Harvard
Modern Languages — Harvard
Nursing — University of Pennsylvania
Performing Arts — Juilliard School
Pharmacy & Pharmacology — Harvard
Philosophy — University of Pittsburgh
Physics & Astronomy — MIT
Politics & International Studies — Harvard
Psychology — Harvard
Social Policy & Administration — Harvard
Sociology — Harvard
Sports-related Subjects — Loughborough University; University of Sydney
Statistics & Operational Research — Harvard
Theology — Harvard
Veterinary Science — University of California, Davis

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education June 15, 2017: Harvard again tops Times Higher Education’s World Reputation Rankings for seventh-year

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EDUCATION

Harvard again tops Times Higher Education’s World Reputation Rankings for seventh-year

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The crown jewel of the Ivy League, Harvard University again is the world most prestigious university reputation wise. Photo: Harvard.edu 

When it comes to reputation, no university in the world can surpass Harvard, who is again the top university. On Thursday, June 14, 2017, The Times Higher Education released their seventh annual World Reputation Ranking with Harvard University remaining in the top spot for six years in a row. The top three are all American universities, with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the second place, and Stanford University in third. British universities round out the top five with the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford both tied for fourth place.

There was little movement in the top 10. There was one big change The University of Chicago moves up two into the top 10 and the ninth spot bumping out Ivy League Columbia University, which falls from ninth to 12th place. The only other change is the University of Oxford moves up to tie with fellow British school The University of Cambridge.

Otherwise, Harvard remains on top as Forbes points out, “Harvard can, as of this month, claim another distinction: the most reputable institution of higher learning on Earth-an honor it has enjoyed for the past six years.” For the six of the past seven years; MIT has been in second place. Eight of the top 10 were American universities, including Stanford University, Princeton University, Yale University, the University of California, Berkeley, the California Institute of Technology and new entry the University of Chicago.

The ranking is considered, “the definitive list of the world’s most prestigious universities.” Phil Baty, the rankings editor for THE, explains, “Reputation is the global currency of higher education. It may be subjective; it may not always be fair, but it matters deeply.” THE’s World Reputation Rankings “have become a major fixture in the higher education calendar — serving as a yearly global academic brand audit and attracting news headlines across the world.”

The ranking is international, with 19 countries represented in the top 100 universities. The United States has the most schools in the ranking but one less this year, with 42 institutions represented and Harvard the top ranking. American universities, however, are seeing a decline, with 20 schools falling in the ranking and only eight improving their positions. In the second place, the United Kingdom has the second most universities with 10, and the University of Cambridge and Oxford University tied at fourth, as the country’s the top school.

The THE is blaming Donald Trump being elected President of the United States and Brexit, for American and British schools losing prestige. THE rankings editor, Phil Baty pointed out about American institutions’ decline, “Claiming 42 places in the top 100 list (one fewer than last year), the US is the most-represented country in the table. But it will have to watch out for the rise of Asia as several of the continent’s higher education stars overtake well-established American powerhouses. Overall 20 of the U.S.’s 42 representatives have declined since last year and only eight have improved; the rest are stagnant.”

The other factor is the rise of Asian universities. The top Asian university is the University of Japan sitting at number 11, barely outside the top ten. There are also two other Asian schools in the top 20, China’s Tsinghua University and Peking University at the number 14 and 17 positions. Since 2011, Tsinghua moved up 21 spots, while Peking moved up 26 spots, both incredible leaps.

As THE indicates the University of Japan ranks higher than Ivy League Columbia University, and that Tsinghua University and Peking University are leading Imperial College London, the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University, two Ivy League universities and a prestigious British school. THE writer Ellie Bothwell comments in the press release, “China’s Tsinghua University and Peking University both leapfrogged the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University in the table this year while the University of Tokyo now has a stronger reputation than Columbia University. Meanwhile, Seoul National University is now considered more prestigious than the University of California, Davis.”

The three Asian universities fare better than any European institutions, where the top school ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich is only 22. European universities are also “losing ground” to Asian schools. China has six schools in the top 100 and Japan also has six ranking as does Germany, the European country with the most universities in the top 100. Both China and Japan had each one more school ranking in the top 100 than last year, while in 2015’s ranking, Japan and China had only two universities each in the top 100.

Canada has three universities in the top 100, with the University of Toronto, the country’s top school falls one to number 24. Meanwhile, the University of British Columbia is in second place in the country drops three spots to number 40. McGill University, which usually ranks as the top university in Canadian rankings, is only third in THE’s World Reputation Ranking of all Canadian schools, and also lost ground moving down three spots to tie for number 42 with the University of California, San Francisco, and LMU Munich.

The rankings are entirely based on the opinion of the institutions, as THE explains, “The rankings are entirely subjective — they are based purely on an annual opinion survey.” The methodology for determining the rankings consists of sending the survey to “more than 10,000 top scholars from around the world. Each academic was asked to name up to 15 universities that they believe are the best for research and teaching in their discipline. Votes for institutions based on research prowess were given twice the weight of those for teaching.”

THE’s Reputation Ranking mirrors THE’s World University Rankings in that most of the top 10 are the same but in vastly different spots. The biggest difference is that Yale University is included within the Reputation Ranking’s top 10, but misses it as 12th place in the World Ranking. While ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, which is number 9 in the world ranking is absent from the Reputation Ranking top 10 and does not even hit the top 20. The World Ranking is far more objective than the perception of reputation and relies on factors including “teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook.”

Top 10 World Reputation Rankings

2017 reputation rank — 2016 reputation rank — Institution Country — 2016–17 WUR position

1, 1 Harvard University, United States, 6
2, 2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States 5
3, 3 Stanford University, United States, 3
4, 4 University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, 4
4, 5 University of Oxford, United Kingdom, 1
6, 6 University of California, Berkeley, United States, 10
7, 7 Princeton University, United States, 7
8, 8 Yale University, United States, 12
9, 11 University of Chicago 10
10, 9 California Institute of Technology, United States, 2

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education February 8, 2017: Harvard still tops US News 2017 Best Global Universities

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EDUCATION

Harvard still tops US News 2017 Best Global Universities

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Harvard University remains the top university in the world according to US News and World Report’s third annual Best Global Universities Rankings, US News released the 2017 ranking on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. The biggest international university ranking looked at the best universities by “region, country, and subject.” This year’s ranking increased the number of school from 750 to 1000 from 65 countries in the world up from 57, giving each one a score out of 100.

There was a lot of movement in the top 10 of the ranking. As for the rest of the top three, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology remained second, and Stanford University moved up one to third. The top public school on the list the University of California-Berkeley moved down one to fourth, while the California Institute of Technology, Caltech moved up two to reach the top five.

The top ten’s two British universities, perennially in the top the University of Oxford (U.K.) and the University of Cambridge each moved down one to the sixth and seventh spot. Princeton joined the top ten, and moved up from 13th to eighth on the list, Princeton topped US News’s Best Colleges National ranking. Columbia University remained ninth, while the University of Chicago dropped out of the top 10 down to number 13.

The top 20 also saw some changes, 17 schools were from the US, with three from the UK including the Imperial College of London at 19. There was also a new entry to the top 20, the University of California San Francisco, a graduate school for the sciences moved up to number 17.

American universities dominated the entire ranking as they did the top 10 with 210 institutions, followed by China with 87 schools continuing the rise of Asian schools and the UK was third with 68 schools, in continental Europe Germany had 55 institutions in the ranking, while France had 49. The United Kingdom pierced the top universities with Oxford University at №6 and the University of Cambridge at №7, both moving down one spot. The US also leads in universities specializing in the arts and humanities, clinical medicine, computer science economics and business and engineering. The UK comes in second in the arts and humanities.

Robert Morse, chief data strategist at U.S. News, explained the reason behind American domination, “U.S. universities do especially well in the Best Global Universities rankings because they place an enormous emphasis on academic research — a key factor in our methodology since these are indicators that can be compared globally. This methodology is different from that of Best Colleges, which measures the overall quality of undergraduate education and focuses on outcomes including graduation and retention rates.”

The first university that made the list outside of the US and the UK was Canada with the University of Toronto at №21 down from 16 last year. The University of British Columbia came in second as it has been for most of this year’s international lists at №31 up two, followed by McGill University at №50 up from 53 last year.

The top European university outside of the UK is the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, coming in at only 35 down from 27 last year. The top Asian university on the list is the University of Tokyo at №44 moving down from 30 last year. In Oceania, the University of Melbourne in Australia took the highest spot for that area on the top 500 at №36 up from 40. The top school in Africa is the University of Cape Town that sits at №112 up from 162.

US News’ global universities list covers five regions including African universities. US News’ added to their country-specific rankings adding six more countries bringing the number to 38. There are 22 subject rankings in all. The subject rankings are dominated by STEM subjects; science, technology, engineering and mathematics with the addition of the arts and humanities.

US News utilizes data from Clarivate Analytics InCitesTM research analytics solutions, and citations data taken from the Web of Science database. The data “measures a university’s global and regional reputation; academic research performance using bibliometric indicators such as publications, citations and international collaboration; and school-level data on faculty and Ph.D. graduates.” This year US News’ altered their methodology “to further emphasize excellence in academic research by factoring in the total number of highly cited papers in the top 1 percent of their respective fields and the percentage of a university’s total papers that are among the top 1 percent of most-cited papers.”

U.S. News 2017 Best Global Universities Rankings top 10:

Overall Best Global Universities

1 Harvard University (U.S.) (1)
2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (U.S.) (2)
3 Stanford University (U.S.) (4)
4 University of California-Berkeley (U.S.) (3)
5 California Institute of Technology (U.S.) (7)
6 University of Oxford (U.K.) (5)
7 University of Cambridge (U.K.) (6)
8 Princeton University (13)
9 Columbia University (U.S.) (9)
10 University of California-Los Angeles (U.S.) (8)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education February 8, 2017: Oxford tops 2016/17 Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings

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EDUCATION

Oxford tops 2016/17 Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Times Higher Education (THE) released their 2016/17 World University Rankings on Sept. 21, 2016, with Britain’s Oxford University taking the leadas the top school. Oxford breaks California Institute of Technology (Caltech) five-year record topping the World University Rankings this year, while the rest of the top ten stayed mostly the same. The 2017 ranking is the first year with a university outside the US topping the list.

The top 10 saw little movement this year the only significant change was in the top two universities switching places, and the University of California, Berkeley moving up three to tie the University of Chicago for 10th place. The top 10 again features one university outside of the United States and the United Kingdom, Switzerland’s ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich. US universities dominate the top 10 and the ranking list in general.

The biggest news, however, from the 2017 world ranking was that Britain dethroned the US with the top university after 12 years. Times Higher Education expressed in their announcement, “This year’s list of the best universities in the world is led by a U.K. university for the first time in the 12-year history of the [list. It is the first time a U.S. institution does not take the top spot.” Phil Baty, the rankings editor at Times Higher Education, commented on Oxford rankings, “It is fantastic news that the University of Oxford has topped the world university rankings for the first time. It is a great result for the UK higher education sector and cements its position as one of the greatest university nations in the world.”

The UK position on top is still fragile, especially with Brexit. Baty advised, “The UK must ensure that it limits the damage to academics, students, universities and science during its Brexit negotiations to ensure it remains one of the world leaders in higher education.” Although this year, Britain topped the ranking, and are behind the US in the number of schools included, their schools are dropping in the ranking.

As the Independent pointed out, “THE’s list has come just weeks after the QS World University Rankings highlighted how post-Brexit uncertainty and long-term funding issues are starting to stir up challenges for the UK’s universities; 38 of the UK’s 48 top-400 universities dropped down the rankings, with the University of Cambridge dropping out of the global top three for the first time since 2004.”

The THE World University Rankings expanded this year’s rankings with more universities from more countries. This year they ranked 978 schools, last year they only looked at 800 institutions. Despite losing the top spot American universities still, dominate the ranking with a third (63) of the schools in the top 200 and 148 overall, while Britain has 16 percent, 32 and 91 schools overall, while Germany has 11 percent in the top 200, with 22 schools represented.

Asian universities are seeing their predominance continue in the THE rankings a trend that began last year. However, there are fewer universities from Japan in the ranking. In total, there are 289 Asian universities on the list from 24 countries, with 19 in the top 200. Baty remarked, “This is meant to be the year that China overtakes the U.S. on science research and science publication.” The top university in Asia is Japan’s National University of Singapore at 24; the school’s best showing.

The ranking’s methodology involves four leading indicators, “teaching, research, citations and international outlook,” however; research takes precedence over the others. Baty explained the ranking’s successful methodology, “The single biggest individual indicator is research impact. We’re looking at 56 million citations, 11.9 million research publications.” As the Wall Street Journal indicates, THE’s World Rankings differs from American rankings is because it factors “global reach and includes only universities.” Oxford edged out Caltech because of its international stature and research, and the resulting income from its research.

In Canada, the University of Toronto again topped the Canadian universities on the list. The University of Toronto moved down three to take the №22 position. The University of British Columbia moved down two to tied for 36, while McGill University moved down four spots to №42. While the top university in Oceania is Australia’s the University of Melbourne which at moved up eight to tie for №38.

The Times Higher Education World University Rankings is an offset of the QS World University Ranking. In 2010, Times Higher Education formed a new partnership with Thomson Reuters in 2010 and created a new methodology. The ranking looks at a university’s “teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook.” Thomson Reuters utilizes 13 indicators to determine the results of the list, they are under five “overall indicators; “industry income, internationalism, teaching, research, and citations.”

The annual ranking includes ten additional lists covering subject fields, and universities in particular areas in addition to the main World University Rankings, which ranks the top 200 institutions. Subject field lists include; Arts & Humanities, Clinical, Pre-clinical & Health, Engineering & Technology, Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, and the Social Sciences. Additionally, THE publishes the 150 Under 50, ranking universities established in the past 50 years, uS College Rankings, Asia University Rankings, Latin American Rankings, and BRICS & Emerging Economies Rankings.

This year Harvard University tops again THE’s World Reputation Rankings, another of the THE lists, which looks at the “top 100 most powerful global university brands.” The top ten is almost filled with American Ivy League universities. MIT moves up two to second place, while Stanford moves up two as well to third. British universities, University of Cambridge and world rankings top school Oxford each drop two to fourth and fifth place respectively. As for the rest of the top 10, University of California, Berkeley is sixth, Princeton University of seventh, Yale University is eighth, followed by Columbia University at ninth, with Caltech rounding out at tenth place.

Times Higher Education’s top 10 from their World University Rankings:

1 University of Oxford, United Kingdom (2)
2 California Institute of Technology, United States (2)
3 Stanford University, United States (3)
4 University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (4)
5 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States (5)
6 Harvard University, United States (6)
7 Princeton University, United States (7)
8 Imperial College London, United Kingdom (8)
9 ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland
10 University of Chicago, United States (10)
10 University of California, Berkeley (13)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education February 8, 2017: Harvard again is ARWU World Rankings best university in 2016/17

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Harvard again is ARWU World Rankings best university in 2016/17

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) released their annual ranking lists on Aug. 15, 2016, with Harvard University again topping the best 500 universities in the world for the 14th year. The ARWU is one of only two major rankings that are not published by a western country either in the United States or the United Kingdom. Shanghai Ranking Consultancy compiles ARWU in China. The ranking is primarily based on scientific research to determine its rankings, and its subject rankings heavily look at the sciences except for the social sciences and economics.

For the 14th straight year, Harvard University topped the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU)’s list. The top ten’s schools are unchanged from last year’s rankings and consist of eight American universities and two British institutions, but they moved around in their ranking. The world ranking also includes national ranks for each school represented on the list.

Stanford University remains in second place, but the University of California Berkeley, the top public school, moves up to third. The United Kingdom’s top school, the University of Cambridge, moves up one to fourth place, with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology falls two to round up the top five.

In the second half of the top ten, Princeton is only the other university to maintain its spot, staying in sixth place. The University of Oxford is the greatest gainer in the top ten going up from tenth to seventh. While the California Institute of Technology Caltech, Columbia University and the University of Chicago each moved down one, to eighth, ninth, and tenth place respectively.

The top ranking university in continental Europe is ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) moving up one to19th. Denmark’s University of Copenhagen moves up to 30th becoming Continental Europe’s second best university, while France’s Pierre & Marie Curie University at 39th moves down to third place in Europe.

The list includes a rising number of Asian universities with The University of Tokyo is the top Asian university on the list, this time entering the top 20, in 20th place. Australia’s the University of Melbourne is the top university in the Oceania region coming at 40th.

The top Canadian university is the University of Toronto at №27 down two from last year. The University of British Columbia moved up three top №34 and second place in Canada.While McGill came in third in Canada moving up one to 63. Israel has a new top university with the Israel Institute of Technology (Technion) moving up nine spots to 67, while Hebrew University moves down 20 spots from last year to 87.

The United States dominates the rankings as it does with all the global lists, while the United Kingdom is in second place. The US holds 15 of the top 20 spots, the UK has three spots, but this year the usual American and British dominance is challenged with the addition of a Swiss and Japanese university.

Although most of the schools in the ranking are from the US and Europe, Asian universities are seeing their numbers rise, with China and Singapore seeing one school crack the top 100 for the first time, China’s Tsinghua University is 58th, while Singapore’s National University of Singapore clocks in at 83.

There are 27 universities appearing in the ranking for the first time, while nine schools broke into the top 100 first time, according to ARWU they are “Tsinghua University, Peking University, Monash University, National University of Singapore, Mayo Medical School and the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.”

The main lists compromises of three different separate rankings; World Top 500 Universities; World Top 200 Universities in Broad Subject Fields, and World Top 200 Universities by Subject Fields. Shanghai Ranking Consultancy has been publishing the list since 2003.

Academic Ranking of World Universities ARWU’s top 10 world universities:

1 Harvard University (1)
2 Stanford University (2)
3 University of California Berkeley (4)
4 University of Cambridge (5)
5 MIT (3)
6 Princeton University (6)
7 University of Oxford (10)
8 California Institute of Technology Caltech (7)
9 Columbia University (8)
10 University of Chicago (9)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

 

Education February 8, 2017: MIT stays on top of QS World University Rankings in 2016/17

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MIT stays on top of QS World University Rankings in 2016/17

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

For the fifth year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is sitting on the top of the QS World University Rankings’ Top Universities. QS World University Rankings released their 2015/16 ranking on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2016, and the first time in the ranking’s history the top three is all American schools, with MIT, Stanford and Harvard University making a trifecta.

The top 10 shows an almost even balance between American and British universities with one continental European institution Switzerland’s ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology at eighth place breaking up what has been for years an exclusive club. “Academic reputation” is the most important determining factor for the lists, and it is reflected by the universities represented in the ranking.

This year there are five American (MIT (1), Stanford (2), Harvard (3), Caltech (5), the University of Chicago (10)). And four British universities (Cambridge (4), Oxford (6), University College of London (7), Imperial College of London (9)) in the top 10. The top Ivy League school on the list is Harvard at №3 down one spot from last year. The 2017 ranking is the first year where a British school did not occupy one of the top three spots. Britain’s leading school, the University of Cambridge, moves down one to fourth place.

Two of the four British universities in the top 10 moved down a spot from last year, showing a troubling trend for British universities throughout the ranking. Meanwhile, there are 11 American universities in the top 20, while there are five British universities in the top 20. In this year’s edition, there are four universities outside of the US and the UK in the top 20, two from Switzerland, and two from Singapore.

The QS World University Rankings consistently includes more non-US and on-UK universities in the top 20 than any of the other international rankings. There are 81 countries represented in the ranking of 916 schools 25 more than last year’s edition. The Unites States has the most universities in the ranking top 200 with a quarter, 48 schools, Britain follows in second place with 30 of the top 200 universities. Despite Britain’s strong showing, British schools are ranking lower than last year, because of concerns regarding Brexit, including attracting students and funding. According to Forbes, “38 of its 48 representatives in the top 400 have lost ground.” Last year there were three schools from London in the top 20, now there are only two.

The top university outside the UK is Switzerland’s ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology moving up one to №8, which is considered “the top university in continental Europe” in many world and global rankings. The top Asian university is The National University of Singapore (NUS) ranking in at №12. Australia’s Australian National University is the top ranking university from the Australasia region falling three to 22.

Canada features three universities in the top 50; the same three universities are Canada’s top institutions in all international rankings. McGill University holds QS’s top spot at №30, moving down six spots, but reclaiming the top spot for Canada. The University of Toronto falls two to №36, while the University of British Columbia is the only one to rise, moving up 5 to 45th place. The QS ranking is the only international ranking where McGill is the top school in the country; University of Toronto usual takes that honor.

Ben Sowter, head of research at the QS Intelligence Unit, who also compiled the ranking, explained to Forbes about the movement, “This year’s rankings imply that levels of investment are determining who progresses and who regresses. Institutions in countries that provide high levels of targeted funding, whether from endowments or from the public purse, are rising.” Sowter continued saying, “On the other hand, Western European nations making or proposing cuts to public research spending are losing ground to their U.S. and Asian counterparts. Innovation and investment remain inextricably linked to one another, and Stanford superseding Cambridge is perhaps the highest-profile example of this pattern.”

QS World University Rankings was originally a collaboration between the education and career company Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) with the Times Higher Education (THE) to create a world university ranking in 2003. For five years the listing was published on THE, with QS supplying the data. In 2010, Times Higher Education decided to break off the partnership and pair up with Thomson Reuters to produce their ranking list. The decision was mostly because of the heavy reliance of using peer reviews to determine the rankings. The QS World University Rankings first appeared in its present format in 2010.

The ranking methodology looks at six indicators in giving marks to each university. The six indicators include, “academic reputation, student-to-faculty ratio, citations per faculty, employer reputation, international faculty ratio, and international student ratio.” Each university is accessed on four factors: “research, teaching, employability, and internationalization.”

The QS World University Ranking changed their methodology last year to focus more heavily on research. There is now more reliance on “citations per faculty, making that indicator weight 20 percent of the final score.” QS is using their data from Scopus, “the world’s largest database of research abstracts and citations.” The ranking’s reliance on citation numbers pushes the balance for universities with active life and natural science programs because academics in those fields have “higher citation rates than in the arts, humanities or social sciences.

The list is highly regarded, but controversial, because they rely on academic peer reviews to rank the universities, others factors include faculty-student ratio, citations by faculty, recruiter review, and internationalism. The World University Rankings list looks at over 900 schools. The ranking includes some sub-lists looking at more specific issues or geographic areas including; By Faculty, Asia, Latin America, BRICS countries; Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, Best Student Cities, By Subject, and also the top 50 universities under 50 years old.

QS World University Rankings Top Universities 2016/17 top 10:

1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States (1)
2 Stanford University, United States(3=)
3 Harvard University, United States (2)
4 University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (3=)
5 California Institute of Technology (Caltech), United States (5)
6 University of Oxford, United Kingdom (6)
7 UCL (University College London), United Kingdom (7)
8 ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Switzerland (9)
9 Imperial College London, United Kingdom (8)
10 University of Chicago, United States (10)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education February 8, 2017: Harvard remains CWUR World Rankings top university in 2016/17

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Harvard remains CWUR World Rankings top university in 2016/17

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The first major university ranking of the year released is the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR), who publishes their list way before the start of the new academic year. On July 11, 2016, the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) released their ranking of the Top 1000 Universities in the world. Harvard topped their list for the fifth time. The CWUR is one of only two major rankings that are not published by a western country either in the United States or the United Kingdom. CWUR is centered in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

The 2016 edition is the fifth year CWUR has released their rankings; the relatively new listing first started in 2012. It includes their ranking of the Top 1000 Universities. After Harvard, the rest of the top three remains the same as last year with Stanford second and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) third.

Two British universities round out the top five as last year, with the University of Cambridge in fourth place closely followed by the University of Oxford rounding out the top five. The top 10 had little movement with one exception Yale reemerged to reclaim the tenth place after dropping to eleventh place last year, while Cornell moved back out of the top ten down to twelfth place.

The US dominated the CWUR rankings as it does with most other world university rankings. There were 224 American schools in the top 1000. The CWUR ranking shows how preeminent Asian schools are becoming globally, here they follow the US in the most school represented an honor usually reserved for the United Kingdom. There are 90 universities from China and 74 from Japan on the list with Britain in fourth with only 65 schools. The UK however, is the only other country to break American dominance in the top ten. CWUR’s Nadim Mahassen indicated, “In 2016, 60 countries — more than ever before — feature in the top 1,000. We hope to see more countries represented in the future.”

CWUR also includes rankings by country, with lists of the best universities in the major countries in all the world’s regions and they correspond to the rankings on the international list. Therefore, Harvard also tops the USA list, while the number four University of Cambridge is the United Kingdom’s top school.

The first school to make the global list outside of the US and the UK was Japan’s the University of Tokyo at number thirteen, the top ranking Asian school; Japan has two universities in the top 20. The first university ranking from the European continent is Switzerland’s Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, which ranks at 23rd down three places from last year. In Oceania, Australia has the top school with the University of Melbourne at 89.

The University of Toronto is Canada’s top university but only ranks at 30 on the international list, up two from last year. McGill University sits at number two in Canada, but only 42 internationally. In the Middle East, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel is the highest-ranking university, coming in at a high number 26 internationally, down three from last year; Hebrew U usually ranks as Israel’s top university.

CWUR centered in Saudi Arabia emphasizes universities located in the Middle East, which is mostly overlooked in other international rankings. Saudi Arabia’s King Saud University at 602 tops the Arab World’s list, Saudi Arabia’s country and the GCC Countries ranking lists.

The key to their methodology is objectivity; all the eight indicators are backed by solid, quantifiable statistics emphasizing graduate success and faculty research. The primary indicators account for 25 percent of the score each and include Quality of Education focused on alumni awards, alumni employment calculating the number of graduates who became CEOs at major companies, Quality of Faculty calculating the awards the faculty has garnered. The remaining indicators account for five percent each and emphasize faculty research and include publications, influence, citations, broad impact using the “university’s h-Index,” and patents.

According to the description of their methodology, “The Centre for World University Rankings (CWUR) publishes the only global university ranking that measures the quality of education and training of students along with the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.”

Mahassen says CWUR’s ranking is “superior” than most of the international rankings because it bases the results entirely on the quantifiable. Mahassen explicitly expressed that the CWUR is better than Times Higher Education World University Rankings because they rely partially on reputation, and is fairer to all disciplines than ARWU because they rely on scientific publications in their ranking methodology.

Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) top 10:

1 Harvard University, USA (1)
2 Stanford University, USA (2)
3 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA (3)
4 University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (4)
5 University of Oxford, United Kingdom (5)
6 Columbia University, USA (6)
7 University of California, Berkeley, USA (7)
8 University of Chicago, USA (8)
9 Princeton University, USA (9)
10. Yale University, USA (11)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education February 8, 2017: University Rankings 2017 roundup American universities threatened by the UK and Europe

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University Rankings 2017 roundup American universities threatened by the UK and Europe

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The 2016–17 rankings season is officially over with the release on February 1, 2017, Times of Higher Education’s newest ranking the inaugural edition of the world’s most international universities. The season catering to college-bound high school students and their parents began in July and finally ended this month. The rankings showcased lists that were national covering only colleges and universities in the United States, but also international lists were American schools competed with high regarded and older universities in the United Kingdom, Europe and the emerging threat of rising Asian schools.

Although the US dominated the rankings in sheer numbers as they always have this year was the first time non-American schools topped international rankings posing a threat to America’s ranking dominance in higher education. On the home front, there was also a shift emerging from the Ivy League in the east to the west with Stanford University being named the top university in two out of three major national rankings. That wave to the west was not as attractive on the international front. When an American school topped an international ranking, it was the jewel of the Ivies Harvard University that claimed the coveted top spot, claiming the throne on three major ranking lists including one published in the US.

Time Higher Education two main rankings their flagship 2016/17 World University Rankings and their latest addition the Most International Universities proved how vulnerable American preeminence in higher education is at the top. Both rankings had non-American schools at the top of their lists. With the World rankings a British schools for the first time dethroned the US, while in the Most International Universities rankings British, European Asian schools left the US out in the cold in not only the top ten but also the top 20 of the ranking.

When Times Higher Education released on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, their inaugural ranking of the Most International Universities looking at global reputation and connections, not one American university made the top 20, with their first showing at number 22 with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For THE the most international schools are in Switzerland with ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich in the top spot, followed by École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in second place. Rounding out the top three is an Asian university, the University of Hong Kong.

Unlike THE World University Rankings, instead of the United States, the United Kingdom dominates the top ten of the most international universities. Five schools starting with the Imperial College of London rank in the top 10, the others include “the University of Oxford (sixth place), the University of Cambridge (eighth place), the University of London (ninth place) and the London School of Economics and Political Science (10th place).” The remaining top ten consists of another school from China fourth place the University of Singapore and Australasia is also represented with the Australian National University in seventh place.

Times Higher Education (THE) released their 2016/17 World University Rankings on Sept. 21, 2016, with Britain’s Oxford University taking the leadas the top school. Oxford broke California Institute of Technology (Caltech) five-year record topping the World University Rankings this year, while the rest of the top ten stayed mostly the same. The biggest news, however, from the 2017 world ranking was that Britain dethroned the US with the top university after 12 years, this is the first year with a university outside the US topping the list.

The top 10 saw little movement this year the only significant change was in the top two universities switching places, and the University of California, Berkeley moving up three to tie the University of Chicago for 10th place. The top 10 again features one university outside of the United States and the United Kingdom, Switzerland’s ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich. US universities dominate the top 10 and the ranking list in general.

In the remaining rankings released this past season, American schools fared better continuing their dominance here is a rundown of the rankings lists:

National Rankings

Forbes Magazine America’s Top 100 Colleges

Forbes Magazine was again the first list to release their national ranking of American colleges and universities. Forbes released their ninth annual ranking of America’s Top 100 Colleges on July 7, 2016, placing the most selective school Stanford University in the top spot. Former Top 100 CollegesWilliams College is second after Stanford followed Princeton University in third, which happens to be the top Ivy League university on the list. In fourth place are Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology rounding out the top five. The remaining top 10 has Yale at №6, and Pomona College at №7. The last remaining schools respectively are Brown University, Wesleyan University, and Swarthmore College.

According to Forbes, the ninth edition of the ranking has a theme of “higher ed in transition.” The top schools are shifting from the East Coast to the West Coast, with Stanford University being the top college in the country and the most selective university. Stanford receives the most applications and admits the least percentage of students. According to Forbes, Stanford “emerged as the nation’s preeminent university,” while “students all over the world are increasingly drawn to the nowness of the West Coast.”

US News’ 2017 Best Colleges

U.S. News & World Report the standard-bearers in the national university and college rankings game released the first of two major college and university rankings for the season. On Sept. 13, 2016, US News released their Best Colleges rankings for 2017 online. Princeton, Williams, and Berkley all saw repeat visits to the top of the rankings with Princeton №1 for the fourth year of all Best National Universities, while Williams remains the Best National Liberal Arts College for the past 15 years. Berkley reined the Top Public Universities as it has for the last 19 years, and the United States Naval Academy is first of the Top Public National Liberal Arts Colleges.

This year there was a shake-up in the top three in both Best National Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges. Most notably in the Best National Universities list, although Harvard remained in second place, the University of Chicago that moved up one to tie Yale University for the third spot. Columbia and Stanford Universities both dropped one spot to being tied for fourth to tied for fifth. The University of Pennsylvania dropped one spot from eighth to ninth place, while the California Institute of Technology drops out of the top 10 from being tied for 10th place to №12.

The top three Best National Liberal Arts Colleges also remained unchanged, with Williams College on top and Amherst in second. The middle of the top changed dramatically with Wellesley College moved up to third, Middlebury College and Swarthmore College tied for fourth and Bowdoin College moved down to sixth. In the second half of the top 10 Carleton College moved up one to seventh place, while formerly fourth place Pomona College dropped three to seventh. The only public school United States Naval Academy dropped out of the top 10 from ninth to 12th place.

Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education college rankings

The nation’s most selective college Stanford University is on top of the inaugural Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education college rankings. WSJ and THE released the first joint ranking of American colleges on Sept. 28, 2016, where the top ten included some of the country’s most elite universities including seven belonging to the Ivy League. Stanford is the top of not only WSJ/THE ranking but also Forbes 2016 American Top College rankings and was MONEY’s top school in 2015.

This new ranking focuses heavily on the outcomes of getting a degree from one the institutions. The ranking’s methodology looks at some factors including “salaries of graduates and debt repayment rates, school reputation, research impact, and how much a college spends to educate each student.” The WSJ also ranked universities on specific factors, “Resources (#1: Harvard University), Student Outcomes (#1: Yale University), Engagement (#1: Dordt College), Environment (#1: La Sierra University).”

World Rankings

Center for World University Rankings (CWUR)

The first major university ranking of the year released is the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR), who publishes their list way before the start of the new academic year. On July 11, 2016, the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) released their ranking of the Top 1000 Universities in the world. Harvard topped their list for the fifth time. After Harvard, the rest of the top three remains the same as last year with Stanford second and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) third.

Two British universities round out the top five as last year, with the University of Cambridge in fourth place closely followed by the University of Oxford rounding out the top five. The top 10 had little movement with one exception Yale reemerged to reclaim the tenth place after dropping to eleventh place last year, while Cornell moved back out of the top ten down to twelfth place.

The US dominated the CWUR rankings as it does with most other world university rankings. There were 224 American schools in the top 1000. The CWUR ranking shows how preeminent Asian schools are becoming globally, here they follow the US in the most school represented an honor usually reserved for the United Kingdom. There are 90 universities from China and 74 from Japan on the list with Britain in fourth with only 65 schools. The UK however, is the only other country to break American dominance in the top ten.

Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU)

The Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) released their annual ranking lists on Aug. 15, 2016, with Harvard University again topping the best 500 universities in the world for the 14th year. The top ten’s schools are unchanged from last year’s rankings and consist of eight American universities and two British institutions, but they moved around in their ranking.

Stanford University remains in second place, but the University of California Berkeley, the top public school, moves up to third. The United Kingdom’s top school, the University of Cambridge, moves up one to fourth place, with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology falls two to round up the top five.

In the second half of the top ten, Princeton is only the other university to maintain its spot, staying in sixth place. The University of Oxford is the greatest gainer in the top ten going up from tenth to seventh. While the California Institute of Technology Caltech, Columbia University and the University of Chicago each moved down one, to eighth, ninth, and tenth place respectively.

The United States dominates the rankings as it does with all the global lists, while the United Kingdom is in second place. The US holds 15 of the top 20 spots, the UK has three spots, but this year the usual American and British dominance are challenged with the addition of a Swiss and Japanese university. Although most of the schools in the ranking are from the US and Europe, Asian universities are seeing their numbers rise, with China and Singapore seeing one school crack the top 100 for the first time, China’s Tsinghua University is 58th, while Singapore’s National University of Singapore clocks in at 83.

QS World University Rankings

For the fifth year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is sitting on the top of the QS World University Rankings’ Top Universities. QS World University Rankings released their 2015/16 ranking on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2016, and the first time in the ranking’s history the top three is all American schools, with MIT, Stanford and Harvard University making a trifecta.

The top 10 shows an almost even balance between American and British universities with one continental European institution Switzerland’s ETH Zurich — Swiss Federal Institute of Technology at eighth place breaking up what has been for years an exclusive club. “Academic reputation” is the most important determining factor for the lists, and it is reflected by the universities represented in the ranking.

This year there are five American (MIT (1), Stanford (2), Harvard (3), Caltech (5), the University of Chicago (10)). And four British universities (Cambridge (4), Oxford (6), University College of London (7), Imperial College of London (9)) in the top 10. The top Ivy League school on the list is Harvard at №3 down one spot from last year. The 2017 ranking is the first year where a British school did not occupy one of the top three spots. Britain’s leading school, the University of Cambridge, moves down one to fourth place.

Two of the four British universities in the top 10 moved down a spot from last year, showing a troubling trend for British universities throughout the ranking. Meanwhile, there are 11 American universities in the top 20, while there are five British universities in the top 20. In this year’s edition, there are four universities outside of the US and the UK in the top 20, two from Switzerland, and two from Singapore.

The QS World University Rankings consistently includes more non-US and on-UK universities in the top 20 than any of the other international rankings. There are 81 countries represented in the ranking of 916 schools 25 more than last year’s edition. The Unites States has the most universities in the ranking top 200 with a quarter, 48 schools, Britain follows in second place with 30 of the top 200 universities.

US News and World Report 2017 Best Global Universities Rankings

Harvard University remains the top university in the world according to US News and World Report’s third annual Best Global Universities Rankings, US News released the 2017 ranking on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. The biggest international university ranking looked at the best schools by “region, country, and subject.” This year’s ranking increased the number of school from 750 to 1000 from 65 countries in the world up from 57, giving each one a score out of 100.

There was a lot of movement in the top 10 of the ranking. As for the rest of the top three, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is second, and Stanford University moves up to third. Princeton joined the top 10 moving from 13 to number on the list, while the University of Chicago dropped out of the top 10 down to number 13. The top 20 also saw some changes, 17 schools were from the US, with three from the UK including the Imperial College of London at 19. There was also a new entry to the top 20, the University of California San Francisco, a graduate school for the sciences moved up to number 17.

American universities dominated the entire ranking as they did the top 10 with 210 institutions, followed by China with 87 schools continuing the rise of Asian schools and the UK was third with 68 schools, in continental Europe Germany had 55 institutions in the ranking, while France had 49. The United Kingdom pierced the top universities with Oxford University at №6 and the University of Cambridge at №7, both moving down one spot. The US also leads in schools specializing in the arts and humanities, clinical medicine, computer science economics and business and engineering. The UK comes in second in the arts and humanities.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 18, 2016: Ivy League early admissions rates for the Class of 2021

HEADLINE NEWS

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EDUCATION

Ivy League early admissions rates for the Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Source: Test Prep Gurus

This year even more high school seniors applied to the Ivy League universities looking for a coveted spot as part of their Class of 2021. The record number of applications drove down the acceptance rates as these colleges to new lows. Every year in mid-December, the colleges notify their applicants whether they were accepted denied or deferred to the regular admission cycle. Those fortunate enough to be accepted have to May 1, 2017, to accept their offer of admission. The following Ivy League universities released their early admission acceptance rates for the Class of 2021:

Harvard University: Harvard accepted 938 applicants out of 6,473 applications for an acceptance rate of 14.5 percent.

Princeton University: Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent.

Brown University: Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

The University of Pennsylvania: Penn accepted 1,335 applicants out of 6,147 applications for an acceptance rate of 22 percent.

Cornell University: Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Dartmouth College: Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Yale University: Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Yale was the only Ivy to increase their admission rate, up nine percent from last year because of their two new residential colleges opening in the fall of 2017.

For last year’s acceptance rates read Harvard, Princeton, Stanford admit less early action applicants to Class of 2020

Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS, is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor with a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Universities June 3, 2016: Harvard tops Times Higher Education’s World Reputation Rankings for sixth year

EXAMINER ARTICLES

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EDUCATION

Harvard tops Times Higher Education’s World Reputation Rankings for sixth year

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, June 3, 2016, 5:50 PM MST

Harvard University has the best global reputation for the sixth year in a row, every year that the Times Higher Education published their World Reputation Rankings, May 4, 2016
Harvard University has the best global reputation for the sixth year in a row, every year that the Times Higher Education published their World Reputation Rankings, May 4, 2016
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