Politics August 2, 2016: Timeline of the Trump-Khan Controversy and backlash

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Timeline of the Trump-Khan Controversy and backlash

By Bonnie K. Goodman

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Khzir Khan, the father of fallen soldier Humayun Kahn, addresses the crowd during the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

PHILADELPHIA, PA – JULY 28:
Khzir Khan, the father of fallen soldier Humayun Kahn, addresses the crowd during the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

On the last day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Thursday, July 29, 2016, Khizr Khan, the father of slain Capt. Humayun Khan who died in 2004 during the Iraq War from a car bomb, spoke about his son at the convention and criticized Trump’s proposed Muslim ban. Khan asked Trump from the stage, “Have you ever been to Arlington Cemetery? Go look at the graves of the brave patriots who died defending America – you will see all faiths, genders, and ethnicities. You have sacrificed nothing and no one.”

Trump never one to let anything insult or slight go went on the attack. At first, Trump dismissed Khan‘s convention comments, saying, Khan “was, you know, very emotional and probably looked like a nice guy to me.” Trump repeatedly implied the soldier’s mother, Ghazala Khan who stood beside her husband at the convention but did not speak was not allowed because of her Muslim faith. Trump questioned, “If you look at his wife, she was standing there. She had nothing to say. She probably, maybe she wasn’t allowed to have anything to say. You tell me.”

Mr. Khan first explained it was because of his wife’s blood pressure that she did not speak, then Ghazala Khan explained her silence on MSNBC’s “Last Word With Lawrence O’Donnell” on Friday, July 29.  Mrs. Khan said, “I cannot even come in the room where his pictures are. That’s why when I saw the picture at my back [on stage in Philadelphia] I couldn’t take it, and I controlled myself at that time.”

Trump also claimed the Khans were pawns of the Clinton campaign and that Khan read from a campaign script, saying, “Who wrote that? Did Hillary’s script writers write it?” Trump chose to make himself the victim in an interview with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos, taped on Saturday, July 30 and aired on Sunday, July 31, claiming, “I think I’ve made a lot of sacrifices. I work very, very hard… Created thousands and thousands of jobs” and “built great structures.” Trump also defended his response on Twitter, writing, “I was viciously attacked by Mr. Khan at the Democratic Convention. Am I not allowed to respond? Hillary voted for the Iraq war, not me!”

Forgotten from Trump remarks was that he told ABC News affiliate WSYX-TV in Columbus, Ohio that he had “great honor” for the fallen Captain Khan who the GOP nominee also called a “hero.” Later Trump’s running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence issued a statement, “Donald Trump and I believe that Captain Humayun Khan is an American hero and his family, like all Gold Star families, should be cherished by every American…. Donald Trump will support our military and their families and we will defeat the enemies of our freedom.” Pence also blamed Obama and Clinton for terrorist organization ISIS, which is at the heart of Trump’s proposed Muslim ban.

The remarks insulted not only the Khans but also military and gold star families. Khan, however, chose to fight back at Trump each time baiting him on a Sunday, July 31 on CNN’s “New Day” where he expressed, “The world is receiving us like we’ve never seen. They have seen the blackness of his character, of his soul.” On NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Khan said Trump “lacks” a “moral compass” and has “no empathy.”

The Khans did not stop playing the moment to the maximum making a media firestorm. While Khizr Khan attacked Trump, his wife explained her silence in heroic fashion. Ghazala Khan even wrote an op-ed for The Washington Post published on Sunday, July 31, “Without saying a thing, all the world, all America, felt my pain. I am a Gold Star mother. Whoever saw me felt me in their heart.”

Clinton also used the moment to her advantage saying in a speech at Cleveland Church on Sunday, July 31, “Mr. Khan paid the ultimate sacrifice in his family, didn’t he? And what has he heard from Donald Trump? Nothing but insults and degrading comments about Muslims – a total misunderstanding of what made our country great, religious freedom, religious liberty. It’s enshrined in our Constitution, as Mr. Khan knows because he’s actually read it.” Concluding, “I think this is a time” for Republicans “to pick country over party.”

On Monday, Aug. 1, Mr. Khan appeared on NBC’s Today show continuing his barrage on the GOP nominee, “This candidate amazes me. His ignorance – he can get up and malign the entire nation, the religions, the communities, the minorities, the judges and yet a private citizen in this political process.… I cannot say what I feel?”

Trump again responded on Twitter on Monday, Aug. 1, writing, “Mr. Khan, who does not know me, viciously attacked me from the stage of the DNC and is now all over T.V. doing the same – Nice!” Another tweet said, “This story is not about Mr. Khan, who is all over the place doing interviews, but rather RADICAL ISLAMIC TERRORISM and the U.S. Get smart!” Later in the evening, Trump appeared on Fox News‘ “Hannity,” saying, “If I were president, his son wouldn’t have died because we wouldn’t be in a war. I wouldn’t have been in the war.”

Although Trump was right to point out, Clinton was more to blame for Khan’s death because she voted for the Iraq War as a New York Senator, Trump faced a backlash from his party and the American public. Arizona Senator and veteran John McCain and Jeb Bush both condemned Trump’s remarks on the Khans. McCain released a statement on Aug. 1, claiming, “I cannot emphasize enough how deeply I disagree with Mr. Trump’s statement.”

Trump also faced criticism from Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on his Muslim travel ban. McConnell expressed on July 31, “I agree with the Khans and families across the country that a travel ban on all members of a religion is simply contrary to American values.” Ryan also praised the Khans and criticized the travel ban; however, neither revoked their endorsement for the GOP nominee.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus, told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on “The Situation Room,” I believe these Gold Star families are off limits, and they’re to be loved and cherished and honored.” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) who was on the short list for Trump’s VP running also criticized the nominee, calling his remarks “inappropriate.”

President Barack Obama also stepped into the controversy defending the Khans on Aug. 1, saying, “no one has given more for our freedom and our security than our Gold Star families.” The next day, on Tuesday, Aug. 2 Obama called Trump “unfit” for the presidency during a press conference. Obama also called for Republican leaders to withdraw their endorsements, “If you are repeatedly having to say in very strong terms that what he has said is unacceptable, why are you still endorsing him? There has to come a point at which you say, ‘enough.'”

The public also disapproved of Trump’s reaction, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll, 56 percent of voters strongly disapproved of Trump’s remarks about the Khans, with 6 out of 10 Republican also disapproving. No matter the response and backlash; Trump had no regrets. The GOP nominee told ABC7 in an interview on Aug. 2, “I said nice things about the son, and I feel that very strongly but of course I was hit very hard from the stage and you know it’s just one of those things, but no I don’t regret anything.”

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Politics July 29, 2016: Hillary Clinton accepts Democratic nomination and place in history

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Hillary Clinton accepts Democratic nomination and place in history

By Bonnie K. Goodman

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)

PHILADELPHIA, PA – JULY 28: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)

Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton made history on Thursday evening, July 28, 2016, becoming the first woman to accept a major party’s nomination for president. Capping off the last night Clinton addressed the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where Clinton tried to define herself and get Americans to vote for her by attacking her Republican opponent, Donald Trump.

Clinton’s speech topped off a Democratic convention that had a multitude of speakers, with women and Hollywood celebrities from the 1960s to today taking center stage. Clinton faced the monstrous task of delivering her address after the Democratic Party’s most dynamic speakers: First Lady Michelle Obama on the convention’s opening day, Monday, July 25, her husband former President Bill Clinton on Tuesday, July 26, and Vice President Joe Biden and President Barack Obama, who gave the speech of his political career on Wednesday, July 27.

Her party formally nominated Clinton on Tuesday. On Thursday evening she was introduced by her daughter Chelsea Clinton. Clinton faced the formable task of generating excitement for her campaign from the American electorate who according to polls deeply do not trust her after the scandal revolving her private email server as Secretary of State.

Clinton tried to shape the 2016 election as a “moment of reckoning.” The newly minted Democratic nominee mixed her campaign slogan with history, “Our Founders embraced the enduring truth that we are stronger together. America is once again at a moment of reckoning.”

Clinton proclaimed that she accepted the Democratic nomination, with “humility, determination and boundless confidence in America’s promise.” She expressed, “Today, we’ve reached a milestone in our nation’s march toward a more perfect union: The first time that a major party has nominated a woman for President. Standing here as my mother’s daughter’s, and my daughter’s mother, I’m so happy this day has come.”

Continuing her emphasis on being the nation’s first woman in history to be nominated to a major party, Clinton said, that she is “Happy for grandmothers and little girls and everyone in between. Happy for boys and men, too, because when any barrier falls in America, for anyone, it clears the way for everyone. When there are no ceilings, the sky’s the limit.”

Clinton also tried to unify the party, attempting to appeal to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ supporters, who have been protesting Clinton’s nomination throughout the convention. Clinton reached out saying, “Bernie, your campaign inspired millions of Americans, particularly the young people who threw their hearts and souls into our primary. And to all of your supporters here and around the country: I want you to know, I’ve heard you. Your cause is our cause. Our country needs your ideas, energy, and passion.” Despite her calls, Clinton still faced protesters’ wrath during her speech.

Although she touched on her historic moment, Clinton’s focus was her rival Trump. Clinton criticized Trump, acceptance speech at the Republican convention the week before, saying “He’s taken the Republican Party a long way, from ‘Morning in America’ to ‘Midnight in America.’ He wants us to fear the future and fear each other.”

Clinton also criticized Trump’s remarks on the military, foreign policy, and terrorist group ISIS, claiming, “Ask yourself: Do you really think Donald Trump has the temperament to be commander in chief? Donald Trump can’t even handle the rough-and-tumble of a presidential campaign. A man you can bait with a tweet is not a man you can trust with nuclear weapons.”

Trump and his campaign were quick to respond and attack back, Trump on Twitter, wrote, “No one has worse judgment than Hillary Clinton – corruption and devastation follows her wherever she goes. Hillary’s wars in the Middle East have unleashed destruction, terrorism and ISIS across the world.”  While Trump’s senior policy adviser Stephen Miller called Clinton’s speech an “insulting collection of cliches and recycled rhetoric.” Miller continued, saying, “She spent the evening talking down to the American people she’s looked down on her whole life.”

Although post-speech reviews for Clinton were mixed, President Obama’s seemed to have approved. The president is campaigning this election not only for the Democratic nominee but for his legacy. Obama took to Twitter, writing, “Great speech. She’s tested. She’s ready. She never quits. That’s why Hillary should be our next @POTUS. (She’ll get the Twitter handle, too).” Clinton supporters enjoyed her speech more than detractors did; however, more Americans viewed her rival Trump’s speech than Clinton, 34.9 million to 33.3 million despite the historic nature.

Politics July 26, 2016: Clinton makes history becomes the first woman nominated for president garners Dem nom

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Clinton makes history becomes the first woman nominated for president garners Dem nom

By Bonnie K. Goodman

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26:  Delegates cheer as a screen displays Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivering remarks to the crowd during the evening session on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

PHILADELPHIA, PA – JULY 26: Delegates cheer as a screen displays Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivering remarks to the crowd during the evening session on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party’s nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Hillary Clinton has finally broken the glass ceiling and made history. On Tuesday, July 26, 2016, Clinton was formally nominated as the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee during the roll call vote on the second day of the convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Former opponent Bernie Sanders proclaimed Clinton the nominee, while many of his supporters walked in protest. Clinton later addressed the convention by video from New York accepting the nomination.

During the roll vote on Tuesday, Clinton was formally nominated after South Dakota announced their delegate count. Then, Clinton, had enough delegates put her over the top of the necessary 2,383 delegates needed to secure the nomination.

Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) formally nominated Clinton. As the first and longest-serving woman in the Senate, Mikulski noted the historic moment, saying, “It is with a full heart that I am here today as we nominate Hillary Clinton to be the first woman president. She wants to break barriers so you won’t have barriers. You can count on her. She’ll fight for your day-to-day needs and the long range needs of the country.”

Civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) seconded the nomination. Rep. Lewis said, “We have come too far, we’ve made too much progress and we are not going back, we are going forward. Eight years ago our party, the Democratic Party nominated and elected the first person of color to serve in the White House. Tonight, on this night, we will shatter that glass ceiling again.”

The roll call was state-by-state with Vermont the last to cast their votes to honor Sanders whose endorsement of Clinton, speech on Monday evening, and efforts during the roll call were aimed at unifying the Democratic Party after a divisive primary.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) nominated Sanders’ praising the Vermont Senator, “My friends, because this is a movement fueled by love it can never be stopped or defeated. Now on the behalf of millions inspired by aloha, determined to seek a future rooted in love, compassion and justice for all and dedicated to a government of the people by the people and for the people. I’m honored to nominate Bernie Sanders for president of the United States.”

Before Clinton was officially declared the nominee, the party carefully orchestrated a tribute to Sanders. The Vermont Senator’s older brother Larry, who lives in Oxford, England, announced the delegate tally for Democrats Abroad. Larry Sanders gave an emotional tribute to their parents and his brother’s revolution.

Sanders expressed, “I want to bring before the convention the names of our parents, Eli Sanders and Dorothy Glassberg Sanders. They did not have easy lives, and they died young. They would be immensely proud of their son and his accomplishments. They loved him. They loved the New Deal of Roosevelt and would be especially proud that Bernard is renewing that vision. It is with enormous pride that I cast my vote for Bernie Sanders.”

Afterward, the Vermont Senator formally proclaimed, “I move that Hillary Clinton be selected as the nominee of the Democratic Party for President of the United States.” Sanders’ proclamation angered his supporters many of whom walked out of the convention hall chanting, “This is what democracy looks like.”

In the evening, Clinton spoke via video to the Convention, accepting the nomination. The video commenced with images of all 44 male presidents before coming to breaking glass, for the glass ceiling Clinton broke with her history-making nomination. After, Clinton told her supporters, “What an incredible honor that you have given me, and I can’t believe we just put the biggest crack in that glass ceiling yet. This is really your victory. This is really your night. And if there are any little girls out there who stayed up late to watch, let me just say I may become the first woman President. But one of you is next.”

Politics July 24, 2016: Wasserman Schultz resigning as DNC chair after emails leaked opposing Sanders

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Wasserman Schultz resigning as DNC chair after emails leaked opposing Sanders

By Bonnie K. Goodman

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After a scandal that showed that the Democratic National Committee favored presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton over Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz will resign. Wasserman Schultz announced her resignation on Sunday afternoon, July 24, 2016, after a three-day drama over emails, which saw her position within the party shrink before she was forced out of her role as chair. Wasserman Schultz resignation will be effective after the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia concludes on July 28.

In her statement announcing her resignation, Wasserman Schultz said, “Going forward, the best way for me to accomplish those goals is to step down as Party Chair at the end of this convention. As Party Chair, this week I will open and close the Convention and I will address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats but all Americans.”

On Friday, July 22, Wikileaks released nearly 20,000 emails from DNC staff members. The emails detailed the DNC’s plans to undermine Sanders’ campaign during the primary season for Clinton. During the primaries, a party is supposed to remain impartial regarding their candidates running for a nomination.

The emails from the DNC chair were the most damning. According to the Hill, Wasserman Schultz wrote in May that Sanders “isn’t going to be president” and in April that he “has no understanding of” the Democratic Party. Wasserman Schultz also planned to use Sanders’ religion to undermine him with voters in the South, although they both are Jewish.

The emails showed Wasserman Schultz as defiant and arrogant and completely against Sanders’ campaign. According to Politico, the DNC chair called “Sanders campaign manager Jeff Weaver a ‘damn liar’ and an ‘ASS’ and said the senator has ‘never been a member of the Democratic Party and has no understanding of what we do.'” There was enough evidence to show that the DNC was biased against Sanders’ from the start of his campaign, for Clinton.

At first, the party just wanted to limit Wasserman Schultz’s involvement in the Democratic Convention. On Saturday, party officials stripped her of actively being the chair and removing her as a speaker to avoid protests from Sanders’ supporters. Then the “DNC Rules Committee named Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio as the permanent chair of the convention.” Fudge will now be responsible for gaveling each day in order and closed. However, Wasserman Schultz and her allies insisted, and now she will have a limited role, and she will address the convention, but afterward will resign her post.

Sanders called for the DNC chair’s resignation for a long time during his campaign claiming bias against him. After the emails released proved the longtime suspicion, Sanders again called for  Wasserman Schultz’s resignation on Sunday morning. Sanders told Jack Tapper on CNN’s State of the Union, “I don’t think she is qualified to be the chair of the DNC, not only for these awful emails, which revealed the prejudice of the DNC, but also because we need a party that reaches out to working people and young people, and I don’t think her leadership style is doing that.”

Continuing, Sanders said, “Aside from all of that, it is an outrage and sad that you would have people in important positions in the DNC trying to undermine my campaign. It goes without saying: The function of the DNC is to represent all of the candidates — to be fair and even-minded.” On ABC’s “This Week” Sanders said, “I think she should resign, period. And I think we need a new chair who is going to lead us in a very different direction….I’m disappointed, and that’s the way it is.”

Sanders received support in his call for the DNC’s resignation from Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid, who wanted Wasserman Schultz to resign even before the emails were leaked. Neither did House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi come to her colleague’s defense. Additionally many party leaders wanted her removed after the embarrassing and damaging emails.

After the DNC chair had announced her resignation, Sanders issued a statement, saying, “Debbie Wasserman Schultz has made the right decision for the future of the Democratic Party. While she deserves thanks for her years of service, the party now needs new leadership that will open the doors of the party and welcome in working people and young people. The party leadership must also always remain impartial in the presidential nominating process, something which did not occur in the 2016 race.” Sanders is set to address the Democratic convention on Monday evening.

After the resignation, both President Barack Obama and Clinton praised Wasserman Schultz in statements. President Obama said, “For the last eight years, Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz has had my back. This afternoon, I called her to let her know that I am grateful.” As well, presumptive nominee Clinton issued a statement, “I am grateful to Debbie for getting the Democratic Party to this year’s historic convention in Philadelphia, and I know that this week’s events will be a success thanks to her hard work and leadership. There’s simply no one better at taking the fight to the Republicans than Debbie.”

GOP nominee Donald Trump has long said the Democratic Party, has been mistreating Sanders. Trump also remarked about Wasserman Schultz’s resignation via Twitter, “Today proves what I have always known, that @Reince Priebus is the tough one and the smart one, not Debbie Wasserman Shultz (@DWStweets.)” Trump tweeted a second time, saying, “Crooked Hillary Clinton was not at all loyal to the person in her rigged system that pushed her over the top, DWS. Too bad Bernie flamed out.”

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus also commented, “I think the day’s events show really the uphill climb Democrats face this week.” Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort also issued a statement, saying, “Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned over her failure to secure the DNC’s email servers and the rigged system she set up with the Clinton campaign. Now Hillary Clinton should follow Wasserman Schultz’s lead and drop out over her failure to safeguard top secret, classified information both on her unauthorized home server and while traveling abroad.”

DNC Vice Chair Donna Brazile will be the interim chair of the party throughout the election. The DNC will vote this week on Brazile taking over, although she has already temporarily filled that role in 2011. There is speculation that Clinton wants Housing Secretary Julian Castro to succeed Wasserman Schultz as DNC chair.

The party’s primary concern now is party unity. The emails complicate the already the delicate agreement between the Sanders and Clinton campaigns. Democrats are concerned about Sanders’ supporters rebelling at the convention; one Democrat called the situation, “gas meets flame,” all of which might backfire and hand the election to the Republicans and Trump.

Politics July 15, 2016: Democratic National Convention releases schedule and speaker list

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Democratic National Convention releases schedule and speaker list

By Bonnie K. Goodman

The Democratic National Convention organizers issued a press release on Friday afternoon, July 15, 2016, which included the schedule and preliminary speaker list for the convention nominating Hillary Clinton. Clinton’s rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was given a primetime speaking slot, indicating the influence of his history-making primary campaign and proving he is not part of Clinton’s vice presidential shortlist. The schedule will eventually include Clinton’s running mate in a primetime post. The Democratic convention will be held July 25 to 28 in Philadelphia.

The following is the preliminary schedule and speaker list.

Monday: “United Together” focusing on “putting the future of American families front and center and how we’re stronger together when we build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top.”

First Lady Michelle Obama, Senator Bernie Sanders, and DREAMer Astrid Silva
Gavel time at 3:00 p.m.

Tuesday: “A Lifetime of Fighting for Children and Families” focusing  on “how Hillary has spent her entire career working to make a difference for children, families, and our country.”

President Bill Clinton
Gavel time at 4:00 p.m.

Mothers of the Movement members: Gwen Carr, Mother of Eric Garner; Sybrina Fulton, Mother of Trayvon Martin; Maria Hamilton, Mother of Dontré Hamilton; Lucia McBath, Mother of Jordan Davis; Lezley McSpadden, Mother of Michael Brown; Cleopatra Pendleton-Cowley, Mother of Hadiya Pendleton; Geneva Reed-Veal, Mother of Sandra Bland.

Wednesday: “Working Together”
President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden
Gavel time at 4:30 p.m.

Thursday: Clinton “will speak about her vision for our country — her belief that we are stronger together and that America is at its best when we work together to solve our problems.”

Hillary Clinton and Chelsea Clinton
Gavel time at 4:30 p.m.

Politics June 5, 2016: Sanders promises contested Democratic convention against Clinton

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Sanders promises contested Democratic convention against Clinton

Politics May 2, 2016: Sanders fights to win nomination promises Clinton battle in contested convention

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Sanders fights to win nomination promises Clinton battle in contested convention

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 2, 2016 9:14 AM MST

 Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is promising to take the battle for the Democratic nomination with Hillary Clinton all the way to a contested convention, May 1, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is promising to take the battle for the Democratic nomination with Hillary Clinton all the way to a contested convention, May 1, 2016
Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Politics April 5, 2016: FBI Director Comey says Clinton email probe will not end before Dem convention

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FBI Director Comey says Clinton email probe will not end before Dem convention

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 5, 2016 11:21 AM MST

FBI Director James Comey is in no rush to complete their investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's private email server ensuring the drama will continue as a backdrop in the presidential campaign, April 4, 2016
FBI Director James Comey is in no rush to complete their investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s private email server ensuring the drama will continue as a backdrop in the presidential campaign, April 4, 2016
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images