Politics May 2, 2017: Trump threatens government shutdown after Congress makes funding deal

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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President Donald Trump is not satisfied with the budget deal Congress made this past weekend and he is threatening a government shutdown. On Tuesday morning, May 2, 2017, President Trump tweeted two posts calling for either changing the filibuster rules in the Senate or a government shutdown so the White House and Congressional Republicans could force a budget without heading to Democrats. Later in the day, Trump backtracked and praised the bill White House Rose Garden at an event honoring the Air Force Academy football team. The threat comes only two days after Congress made a bipartisan deal to fund the government through the end of the 2017 fiscal year aimed at averting a government shutdown on the GOP’s watch.

The disgruntled president took to Twitter to express his displeasure with the Congressional budget deal. Trump wrote in two tweets, “The reason for the plan negotiated between the Republicans and Democrats is that we need 60 votes in the Senate which are not there! We either elect more Republican Senators in 2018 or change the rules now to 51%. Our country needs a good “shutdown” in September to fix mess!”

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan responded to the president’s concerns at a press conference on Capitol Hill Tuesday morning. Ryan commiserated, “Look, we have a long ways to go between now and September, but I share the president’s frustration. I feel good about the wins we got with the administration in this bill.”

Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell shot down the president’s request to change Senate legislative rules to prevent a filibuster at 60 votes to a simple majority. McConnell replied, “That will not happen.” Continuing, the Senate leader explained, “There is an overwhelming majority on a bipartisan basis not interested in changing the way the Senate operates on the legislative calendar.”

Later, President Trump seemed to have changed his mind about the bill hailing it as a victory. Speaking in the White House Rose Garden, Trump expressed, “After years of partisan bickering and gridlock, this bill is a clear win for the American people.” Continuing the President said, “We brought lawmakers together from both sides of the aisle to deliver a budget that funds the rebuilding of the United States military, makes historic investments in border security and provides health care for our miners and school choice for our disadvantaged children.” Trump also praised the increase in funds allotted for border security, claiming, “We achieved the single largest increase in border security funding in 10 years. So we have more money now for the border than we’ve gotten in 10 years,” Trump said. “The Democrats didn’t tell you that.”

At the White House Daily Press Briefing Trump’s Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney rationalized the President’s first response to the budget deal. Mulvaney explained, “I think the president is frustrated with the fact that he negotiated in good faith with the Democrats and they went out to try to spike the football and make him look bad. I get that frustration because I think it is a terrible posture for the Democrats to take.” The OMB Director did not take a possible government shutdown off the table, saying, “We’ve got a lot to do between now and September. I don’t anticipate a shutdown in September. But if negotiations — if the Democrats are not going to behave any better than they have the last couple days, it may be inevitable.”

The bipartisan budget deal reached on Sunday evening, April 30, went against President Trump’s wishes in certain key areas. There was no down payment allotted for the proposed border wall with Mexico, an important campaign pledge for the president. Neither did the budget cut funding for Planned Parenthood, something the GOP has wanted to do for a long time. Trump also wanted to cut funding for Obamacare subsidies, the budget will cover them. Sanctuary cities will also remain funded much to the president’s chagrin.

The budget does increase funding to certain key areas. There is a $15 billion increase in military spending, with $1.5 billion going to border security. The National Institute of Health will see a bump of $2 billion in funding. The Environment Protection Agency’s funding remains almost the same, but more funding is going to clean energy and science. Additionally, $68 million goes to New York and Florida to reimburse them for their state spending to protect the president and his family.

The deal also allocates more money to solve some outstanding issues, including miners’ health insurance, Puerto Rico Medicaid, transit infrastructure grants, year-round Pell Grants and fighting the opioid epidemic. There were also funded increases for national disasters in California, West Virginia, Louisiana, and North Carolina. Republicans had to cave in to Democrats’ demands on “poison pills” to avert a government shutdown, which would have been disastrous for the GOP because they control Congress and the White House.

Congress was originally set to shut down on April 29, until they passed a short-term spending bill that lasts until Friday, May 5. The House passed the bill 382–30 on Friday, April 28, the Senate followed suit, and the president signed the bill soon after averting a shutdown with a day left to the deadline. Despite his opposition to the new omnibus bill that will fund the government through September, Trump has no plans to force a shutdown now and intends to sign the bill. A budget fight, however, looms over the 2018 fiscal year, and the government could see another shutdown in October.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Politics August 17, 2016: FBI hands Congress over Clinton interview notes investigation report

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FBI hands Congress over Clinton interview notes investigation report

By Bonnie K. Goodman

WASHINGTON D.C., July 7, 2016-- U.S. FBI Director James Comey swears an oath before the House Oversight Committee over investigation into Hillary Clinton's email system, on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, July 7, 2016. U.S. FBI Director James Comey on Thursday defended his decision not to recommend charges against Hillary Clinton, but refuted several of her statements to justify the use of private email setup as secretary of state. (Xinhua/Bao Dandan via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON D.C., July 7, 2016– U.S. FBI Director James Comey swears an oath before the House Oversight Committee over investigation into Hillary Clinton’s email system, on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, July 7, 2016. U.S. FBI Director James Comey on Thursday defended his decision not to recommend charges against Hillary Clinton, but refuted several of her statements to justify the use of private email setup as secretary of state. (Xinhua/Bao Dandan via Getty Images)

The FBI handed over its report on their decision not to recommend criminal charges for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton over her private email server to Congress. The FBI sent the classified report originally for the Department of Justice and interview memos, called 302s to the House Oversight Committee on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016, following through on their request. The House is also is also request the DOJ file charges because Clinton perjured herself in her sworn testimony to the House’s Benghazi committee.

FBI Acting Assistant Director Jason V. Herring included a letter to “House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz” and “ranking Democratic member, Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings” re-explaining the bureau’s decision not to charge Clinton. Herring wrote, “The FBI conducted this investigation, as it does all investigations, in a competent, honest and independent way. As the director stated, the FBI did find evidence that Secretary Clinton and her colleagues were extremely careless in their handling of certain, very sensitive, highly classified information.”

Continuing Herring clarified, “The term ‘extremely careless’ was intended to be a common sense way of describing the actions of Secretary Clinton and her colleagues. The director did not equate ‘extreme carelessness’ with the legal standard of ‘gross negligence’ that is required by the statute. In this case, the FBI assessed that the facts did not support a recommendation to prosecute her or others within the scope of the investigation for gross negligence.” Herring also suggested that usually what Clinton would be subject to is “severe administrative consequences.”

Among the documents, the FBI handed over was the summary of Clinton’s three and a half hour interview with the bureau that took place last month. FBI Director James Comey promised the reports and memos when he testified on July 7 before the House Oversight panel, saying he would do “everything I can possibly give you under the law and to doing it as quickly as possible.”

The documents are considered classified and will never be made public. Republicans are trying to keep Clinton’s email scandal in the limelight the election, hoping it can damage her bid for the presidency despite leading Republican Donald Trump in the polls. The FBI issued a statement warning that the information should not be made public, writing, “The material contains classified and other sensitive information and is being provided with the expectation it will not be disseminated or disclosed without FBI concurrence.”

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) issued a statement, however, arguing the documents should be made available to the public. Grassley wrote, “On initial review, it seems that much of the material given to the Senate today, other than copies of the large number of emails on Secretary Clinton’s server containing classified information, is marked ‘unclassified/for official use.’ The FBI should make as much of the material available as possible. The public’s business ought to be public, with few exceptions. The people’s interest would be served in seeing the documents that are unclassified. The FBI has made public statements in describing its handling of the case, so sharing documents in support of those statements wherever appropriate would make sense.”
Clinton campaign responded with a statement, “This is an extraordinarily rare step that was sought solely by Republicans for the purposes of further second-guessing the career professionals at the FBI. We believe that if these materials are going to be shared outside the Justice Department, they should be released widely so that the public can see them for themselves, rather than allow Republicans to mischaracterize them through selective, partisan leaks.”

The spokesperson for the House Oversight Committee confirmed receipt in a statement, “The FBI has turned over a ‘number of documents’ related to their investigation of former Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal email server. Committee staff is currently reviewing the information that is classified SECRET. There are no further details at this time.”

Congressional Republican are looking to make sure Clinton pays as CNN pointed out a “political price” for her actions during her tenure at the State Department since the FBI did not recommend criminal charges. Reps. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Bob Goodlatte, R-Virginia sent a letter to the Department of Justice asking the DOJ to charge Clinton with perjury claiming she perjured herself during her testimony to the House’s Benghazi committee.

Republicans are accusing Clinton of lying four times in her testimony to the committee saying what she said countered what she told the FBI. In the letter, Chaffetz and Goodlatte wrote, “The evidence collected by the (FBI) during its investigation of Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal email system during her time as secretary of state appears to directly contradict several aspects of her sworn testimony.”

On Monday, Aug. 15, 35 Republicans led by Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.) called on Comey to release Clinton’s interview notes because they believe she perjured herself. Tuesday morning before the documents were handed over Marino appeared on Fox News where he said about Clinton, “That she lied under oath to Congress when she came into testify. And if she lied, she perjured herself. She lied to Congress, therefore she can be prosecuted and spend as long as 10 years in prison for doing that. The director of the FBI, the Justice Department, in my opinion, they’re taking direction from the White House saying, ‘Do nothing about this.'”

Politics August 6, 2016: Trump finally endorses Paul Ryan, John McCain, and Kelly Ayotte

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Trump finally endorses Paul Ryan, John McCain, and Kelly Ayotte

By Bonnie K. Goodman

GREEN BAY, WI - AUGUST 05: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally on August 5, 2016 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Trump endorsed House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) during the rally in an effort to heal rifts within the Republican Party. (Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

GREEN BAY, WI – AUGUST 05: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally on August 5, 2016 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Trump endorsed House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) during the rally in an effort to heal rifts within the Republican Party. (Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

After a couple of days of drama, Republican nominee Donald Trump endorsed Speaker of the House and Wisconsin Representative Paul Ryan, Arizona Senator John McCain and New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte in their re-election bids for their Congressional and Senate seats. Trump made the endorsements official on Friday evening, Aug. 5, 2016, at a rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Trump expressed that he wanted to be a “big tent” Republican like Ronald Reagan in a speech that was rather unusual for Trump in that he read it off prepared remarks.

Trump in announcing his endorsements stated, “This campaign is not about me or any one candidate, it’s about America. I understand and embrace the wisdom of Ronald Reagan’s big tent within the party. So I embrace the wisdom that my 80 percent friend is not my 20 percent enemy.” Trump emphasized that he would need the support of the House and Senate as president.

Then after 10 minutes into his speech, Trump endorsed Speaker Ryan. Trump remarked, “We will have disagreements, but we will disagree as friends and never stop working together toward victory. And very importantly toward real change. So in our shared mission to make America great again, I support and endorse our speaker of the house Paul Ryan.” Trump’s endorsement comes only days before Ryan’s primary on Tuesday, Aug. 9, where he leads his opponent Paul Nehlen by 66 percent.

Continuing Trump endorsed McCain, both have been highly critical of the other. The GOP nominee said, “And while I’m at it, I hold in the highest esteem Senator John McCain for his service to our country in uniform and public office, and I fully support and endorse his reelection Very important. We’ll work together.”

After the rally, Trump’s campaign sent a fundraising email to supporters touting party unity and the endorsements. The email read, “It’s time to unite our Party and deny the third term of Obama. I have officially endorsed Paul Ryan — and together, we will fight for YOU, and together we will Make America Great Again!”

The controversy over the Ryan endorsement commenced on Tuesday, Aug. 2 when Trump spoke to the Washington for an interview. Trump echoed Ryan earlier comments about endorsing him back in May. The GOP nominee said, “I like Paul, but these are horrible times for our country. We need very strong leadership. We need very, very strong leadership. And I’m just not quite there yet. I’m not quite there yet.”

Trump running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence broke with Trump over the endorsements choosing to endorse Ryan on Wednesday, Aug. 3. Pence endorsed Ryan in a phone interview with Fox News, stating, “I strongly support Paul Ryan, strongly endorse his re-election. He is a longtime friend. He’s a strong conservative leader. I believe we need Paul Ryan in leadership in the Congress of the United States.”
Pence later tweeted that he told his running mate in advance of his decision, “I talked to @realDonaldTrump this morning about my support for Paul Ryan and our longtime friend ship….” According to a Trump campaign insider, the GOP nominee is giving Pence “latitude” to speak his mind and convictions, and Pence’s endorsement was hardly a falling out.

Trump’s withholding the endorsement, however, was causing friction with fellow Republicans, who were quickly abandoning the GOP nominee. Even Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus, a friend of Ryan’s and also from Wisconsin, was upset at Trump veering off the script.

Trump’s decision to endorse Ryan came only hours after Ryan suggested he could be easily unendorsed Trump if he sees fit. On Friday morning, Ryan told local Wisconsin radio WTAQ’s Jerry Bader, “None of these things are ever blank checks, that goes with any situation in any kind of race.” Continuing Ryan explained why he endorsed Trump in the first place, “he won the delegates, he won the thing fair and square it’s just that simple.”

Politics June 23, 2016: House Democrats hold sit-in protesting over gun control pledge no bill no break

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House Democrats hold sit-in protesting over gun control pledge no bill no break

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 23, 2016 9:43 AM MST
Democrats staged a sit-in on the House floor on Wednesday and demanded a vote on gun control legislation.

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Democrats staged a sit-in on the House floor on Wednesday and demanded a vote on gun control legislation.
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Politics May 31, 2016: McConnell, Trump drafting Rubio to run for re-election to Florida Senate seat

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McConnell, Trump drafting Rubio to run for re-election to Florida Senate seat

May 31, 2016, 1:18 PM MST
Republican leaders are urging Marco Rubio to run for re-election for his Senate seat from Florida in attempt to maintain control of the Senate come November, May 31, 2016
Republican leaders are urging Marco Rubio to run for re-election for his Senate seat from Florida in attempt to maintain control of the Senate come November, May 31, 2016
Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

McConnell, Trump drafting Rubio to run for re-election to Florida Senate seat

May 31, 2016

Politics May 13, 2016: Trump goes to Washington meets Ryan agree on unity but still no endorsement

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Trump goes to Washington meets Ryan agree on unity but still no endorsement

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 13, 2016 3:21 AM MST

Presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump went to Washington to meet with Speaker Paul Ryan and GOP leadership, Ryan and Trump are moving closer, but Ryan still will not endorse the nominee, May 12, 2016
Presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump went to Washington to meet with Speaker Paul Ryan and GOP leadership, Ryan and Trump are moving closer, but Ryan still will not endorse the nominee, May 12, 2016
Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Politics April 28, 2016: Former Speaker John Boehner describes Ted Cruz as Lucifer in the flesh

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Former Speaker John Boehner describes Ted Cruz as Lucifer in the flesh

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 28, 2016 12:30 PM MST

 Former Speaker John Boehner does not believe Texas Senator Ted Cruz should be the GOP's nominee calling him Lucifer and a son of a bitch at a town hall at Stanford University, April 27, 2016
Former Speaker John Boehner does not believe Texas Senator Ted Cruz should be the GOP’s nominee calling him Lucifer and a son of a bitch at a town hall at Stanford University, April 27, 2016
Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Politics February 4, 2016: House committee to launch probe into federal recordkeeping, Clinton’s emails

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House committee to launch probe into federal recordkeeping, Clinton’s emails

By Bonnie K. Goodman

February 4, 2016 1:15 PM MST

 A new House committee investigation plans to look into federal recordkeeping violations including those of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Feb. 4, 2016
A new House committee investigation plans to look into federal recordkeeping violations including those of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Feb. 4, 2016
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Politics January 13, 2016: Obama returns to hope and change to define legacy in final State of the Union

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Obama returns to hope and change to define legacy in final State of the Union

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 13, 2016 6:23 AM MST

Rising above politics as usual, President Barack Obama delivers his final state of the Union address to a fiercely divided Congress embattled in a heated election year, Jan. 12, 2016

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Rising above politics, as usual, President Barack Obama delivers his final state of the Union address to a fiercely divided Congress embattled in a heated election year, Jan. 12, 2016
Photo by Evan Vucci – Pool/Getty Images / White House YouTube

Politics January 7, 2016: GOP Congress makes history sends first ObamaCare repeal to president’s desk

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GOP Congress makes history sends first ObamaCare repeal to president’s desk

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 7, 2016 9:31 AM MST

The Republican Congress finally passed their Obamacare repeal bill and they are sending it to the president's desk, where he vowed to veto it, Jan. 6, 2016
The Republican Congress finally passed their Obamacare repeal bill and they are sending it to the president’s desk, where he vowed to veto it, Jan. 6, 2016
Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Politics January 4, 2016: Obama fires up Republicans with gun control executive actions announcement

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Obama fires up Republicans with gun control executive actions announcement

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 4, 2016 7:58 PM MST

President Barack Obama discussed with reporters his gun control executive actions in the Oval Office, Republicans are already voicing their opposition, Jan. 4, 2016

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President Barack Obama discussed with reporters his gun control executive actions in the Oval Office; Republicans are already voicing their opposition, Jan. 4, 2016
Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images / White House YouTube

Politics December 19, 2015: Congress passes omnibus spending and tax break bills averts government shutdown

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Congress passes omnibus spending and tax break bills averts government shutdown

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 19, 2015, 7:22 AM MST

Congress passed a sweeping omnibus spending bill and tax breaks bill with bipartisan support funding the government for the next year, ending any talk of a government shutdown until then, Dec. 18, 2015
Congress passed a sweeping omnibus spending bill and tax breaks bill with bipartisan support funding the government for the next year, ending any talk of a government shutdown until then, Dec. 18, 2015
Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Politics December 16, 2015: Ted Cruz investigated for leaking classified information during the GOP debate

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Ted Cruz investigated for leaking classified information during the GOP debate 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 16, 2015, 7:25 PM MST

The Senate Intelligence Committee is investigating Ted Cruz for possibly revealing classified information about National Security Agency's surveillance program during the GOP debate, Dec. 16, 2015
The Senate Intelligence Committee is investigating Ted Cruz for possibly revealing classified information about National Security Agency’s surveillance program during the GOP debate, Dec. 16, 2015
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Politics December 11, 2015: Congress close to reaching spending bill deal averts government shutdown again

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Congress close to reaching spending bill deal averts government shutdown again 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 11, 2015, 7:42 PM MST

Congress passed a short-term spending bill giving them another five days to pass the 2016 omnibus-spending bill; Senate leaders want to unveil the bill on Monday, but House leaders believe it will take longer, Dec. 11, 2015
Congress passed a short-term spending bill giving them another five days to pass the 2016 omnibus-spending bill; Senate leaders want to unveil the bill on Monday, but House leaders believe it will take longer, Dec. 11, 2015
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Politics December 10, 2015: Obama signs bipartisan No Child Left Behind replacement education law

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Obama signs bipartisan No Child Left Behind replacement education law

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 10, 2015, 4:01 PM MST

President Barack Obama delivers remarks during the signing of the Every Student Succeeds Act ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Dec. 10, 2015

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President Barack Obama delivers remarks during the signing of the Every Student Succeeds Act ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Dec. 10, 2015
Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon / White House YouTube

Politics November 30, 2015: Speaker Ryan invites Obama to his last State of the Union address as president

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Speaker Ryan invites Obama to his last State of the Union address as president

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, November 30, 2015, 5:13 PM MST

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan sent President Barack Obama an invitation letter for his last State of the Union Address; it will be the earliest date the address has been delivered in nearly 40 years, Nov. 30, 2015
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan sent President Barack Obama an invitation letter for his last State of the Union Address; it will be the earliest date the address has been delivered in nearly 40 years, Nov. 30, 2015
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Politics November 20, 2015: Obama v Congress on bill blocking refugees, will there be a government shutdown?

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Obama v Congress on bill blocking refugees, will there be a government shutdown?

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, November 20, 2015, 12:01 PM MST

President Barack Obama, Congressional Republicans and some Democrats in a battle over admitting Syrian refugees after the Paris terror attacks, the showdown could lead to a government shutdown in December, Nov. 19, 2015
President Barack Obama, Congressional Republicans and some Democrats in a battle over admitting Syrian refugees after the Paris terror attacks, the showdown could lead to a government shutdown in December, Nov. 19, 2015
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Politics November 6, 2015: Obama rejects Keystone XL Pipeline much to Trudeau’s disappointment

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Obama rejects Keystone XL Pipeline much to Trudeau’s disappointment

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, November 6, 2015, 5:35 PM MST

 

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President Barack Obama announces that he is rejecting a permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline during a statement at the White House, Nov. 3, 2015
Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images / White House YouTube

 

Politics November 5, 2015: Paul Ryan ends Speaker of the House expense checks

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Paul Ryan ends Speaker of the House expense checks

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, November 5, 2015, 11:00 AM MST

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan is changing the way that the House of Representatives does business starting with ending the speaker's monthly expense check, Nov. 4, 2015
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan is changing the way that the House of Representatives does business starting with ending the speaker’s monthly expense check, Nov. 4, 2015
Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Politics October 30, 2015: Senate passes budget deal in night session, sends it to Obama to sign

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Senate passes budget deal in night session, sends it to Obama to sign

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, October 30, 2015, 8:19 AM MST

The Senate passed the two-year budget and debt ceiling bill, but more than half of the Republicans voted against it, the bill needs to be signed by President Barack Obama before Nov. 3, when the country reaches its borrowing limit, Oct. 30, 2015
The Senate passed the two-year budget and debt ceiling bill, but more than half of the Republicans voted against it, the bill needs to be signed by President Barack Obama on Nov. 3, when the country reaches its borrowing limit, Oct. 30, 2015
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Politics October 29, 2015: Paul Ryan elected 54th Speaker of the House calls for unity in first address

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Paul Ryan elected 54th Speaker of the House calls for unity in first address

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, October 29, 2015, 7:39 PM MST

Paul Ryan delivers his first speech as Speaker of the House of Representatives where he called for unity, Oct. 29, 2015

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Paul Ryan delivers his first speech as Speaker of the House of Representatives where he called for unity, Oct. 29, 2015
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images / RepPaulRyan YouTube

Politics October 29, 2015: John Boehner bids farewell to House of Representatives with no regrets

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John Boehner bids farewell to House of Representatives with no regrets

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, October 29, 2015, 2:51 PM MST

Outgoing Speaker of the House John Boehner delivers his farewell address; Boehner is retiring after 25 years in Congress and five years as Speaker of the House, Oct. 29, 2015

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Outgoing Speaker of the House John Boehner delivers his farewell address; Boehner is retiring after 25 years in Congress and five years as Speaker of the House, Oct. 29, 2015
Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images / John Boehner YouTube

Politics October 29, 2015: House passes budget and debt ceiling deal with a 266 to 167 vote

House passes budget and debt ceiling deal with a 266 to 167 vote

October 29, 2015

Politics October 29, 2015: Republicans nominate Paul Ryan for next Speaker of the House

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Republicans nominate Paul Ryan for next Speaker of the House 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, October 29, 2015, 7:37 AM MST

 

House Ways and Means Chairman Paul Ryan, R-WI was officially nominated by House Republicans to become the next Speaker of the House of Representatives, becoming one of the youngest in history, Oct. 28, 2015
House Ways and Means Chairman Paul Ryan, R-WI was officially nominated by House Republicans to become the next Speaker of the House of Representatives, becoming one of the youngest in history, Oct. 28, 2015
Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Politics October 29, 2015: House passes budget and debt ceiling deal with a 266 to 167 vote

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House passes budget and debt ceiling deal with a 266 to 167 vote

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, October 29, 2015, 7:36 AM MST

The House of Representatives passed a two-year budget and debt ceiling deal, but two thirds of Republicans voted against the measure, Oct. 28, 2015
The House of Representatives passed a two-year budget and debt ceiling deal, but two thirds of Republicans voted against the measure, Oct. 28, 2015
Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images