Politics November 5, 2016: Clinton has less than 270 Electoral College votes in latest CNN projection

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Clinton has less than 270 Electoral College votes in latest CNN projection

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Proving just how close this election has become CNN latest Electoral College projection has Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton dipping below the magic number of 270 in her column. CNN released their “Road to 270” map projection on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, giving Clinton 268 Electoral College votes while Republican nominee Donald Trump moved to 204 votes as more states move into the battleground column with just four days before Election Day on Tuesday, Nov. 8.

According to the latest edition of CNN’s electoral map Clinton has 268 votes from solidly Democrat or leaning Democrat states, while Trump has 204 votes from solidly Republican or leaning Republican.

In the solidly Democrat column are the following states:
“California (55), Connecticut (7), Delaware (3), DC (3), Hawaii (4), Illinois (20), Maine (3), Maryland (10), Massachusetts (11), New Jersey (14), New York (29), Oregon (7), Rhode Island (4), Vermont (3), Washington (12), Minnesota (10), New Mexico (5) (200 total)”

In the leaning Democrat column are the following states:
“Colorado (9), Michigan (16), Pennsylvania (20), Virginia (13), Wisconsin (10), (68 total)”

In the solidly Republican column are the following states:
“Alabama (9), Alaska (3), Arkansas (6), Idaho (4), Indiana (11), Kansas (6), Kentucky (8), Louisiana (8), Mississippi (6), Missouri (10), Montana (3), Nebraska (4), North Dakota (3), Oklahoma (7), South Carolina (9), South Dakota (3), Tennessee (11), Texas (38), West Virginia (5), Wyoming (3) (157 total)”

In the leaning Republican column are the following states:
“Georgia (16), Iowa (6), Maine 2nd Congressional District (1), Ohio (18), Utah (6) (47 total)”

There are six battleground states; “Arizona, Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina and the 2nd congressional district in and around Omaha, Neb.” While three states moved into the leaning Republican column; “Maine’s 2nd Congressional District, Ohio and Utah.” Before New Hampshire was in the leaning Democrat column and has now moved into battleground territory.

This shift in the map represents changing polls nationally Clinton and Trump either tie or Clinton has a narrow lead within the margin of error, but the state polling has shown a more dramatic and concrete shift. The states’ Electoral College votes matter more than national polls on Election night, and they determine who win and become the next president. Although the change shows momentum for Trump, many predictions are still claiming Clinton will win despite the October Surprise, the renewed FBI probe over her email server as Secretary of State.

Bonnie K. Goodman has a BA and MLIS from McGill University and has done graduate work in religion at Concordia University. Ms Goodman is an expert inpresidential campaigns and election history and she has been covering American elections as a journalist since 2004.

Advertisements

Politics November 2, 2016: Voters not too bothered by renewed Clinton email investigation, but why?

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Voters not too bothered by renewed Clinton email investigation, but why?

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Three new polls show that American voters do not seem to care very much about the FBI Director James B. Comey’s renewed investigation into Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s email server, which is troubling. On Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016, ABC News/Washington Post poll found that 66 percent of voters say the new probe is not going to change how they vote. Meanwhile, in the first national Politico/Morning Consult poll released after the news from FBI on Monday, Oct. 31, Clinton still maintains her same three-point lead over Republican nominee Donald Trump. Even worse, in the latest the Reuters/Ipsos survey released on Monday, Clinton has 5-point lead over Trump. Although this good news for Clinton it does not say much about the judgment of the American voters where an FBI investigation does not matter when the person in question wants to be president.

With a week left before the election, Clinton still holds on to her lead in the latest national Politico/Morning Consult poll. Clinton has the support of 42 percent of voters to Trump’s 39 percent support in a four-way race. Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson has 7 percent support, while Green Party nominee Jill Stein has 5 percent. Clinton still maintains her lead in a two-way race with 46 percent to Trump’s 43 percent.

The poll also asked voters how they felt about Clinton’s renewed email scandal. Fortunately at least a minority find it troubling, and it will now to affect how the vote on Nov. 8. According to the poll, 33 percent say they are “less likely” to vote for Clinton after the news broke, while 39 percent of Americans say it will not sway their vote. However, 45 percent “agreed with Trump” Clinton’s email scandal is worse than Watergate. The ABC News/Washington Post poll seems to concur; determining that 34 percent of voters are less likely to vote for Clinton after newly discovered emails forced the FBI to renew their investigation into Clinton.

Even more troubling is a third poll released Monday, the Reuters/Ipsos survey gave Clinton a five-point lead. In the survey, Clinton has 44 percent support to Trump’s 39 percent in a two-way race. The polls give Clinton a six percent lead in a four-way race, Clinton has 43 percent support to Trump’s 37 percent, while Johnson has six percent with Stein at just one percent.

On Friday morning, Oct. 28, FBI Director James Comey sent a letter to Congressional Committee leaders informing them of a new development the discovery of news and that the FBI will be reopening their investigation into Clinton’s private server. The FBI discovered 650,000 emails on the computer of disgraced Congressman Anthony Weiner in their investigation of his sending sexually inappropriate text messages to an underage girl.

Weiner is the estranged husband of Huma Abedin, Clinton’s longtime aide who was Clinton’s deputy chief of staff at the State Department and is now her deputy campaign chair. Abedin also had an account on Clinton’s server. FBI agents knew of the emails for two weeks before notifying Comey on Thursday, Oct. 27. The bureau was just granted a warrant to search the emails on Sunday, Oct. 30. Comey has faced praised from Trump’s campaign but criticism and attacks from Clinton her campaign and Congressional supporters for the timing of the letter.

Voters’ attitude toward the renewed investigation is surprising. We live in a society that still despite advances for many demographic groups views criminal activity, whether suspected, questionable or convicted with abhorrence. The mantra might be innocent until proven guilty, but in the public opinion, any question, nevermind an arrest is enough to convict in the court of public opinion. In the United States criminals even lose their voting right when convicted.

This same opinion is not just reserved for the average person, or demographic groups that the public feel are more prone to get involved in criminal activity sometimes based just on social circumstance but usually for our politicians. Americans put leaders to a higher standard and claim they want them to have with impeccable morals. Former President Richard Nixon’s involvement in the Watergate cover-up is forever seared as the standard-bearer. Although he worked hard to rehabilitate his image as the elder statesman, he was still considered by many a “crook.” The sex scandals that are discovered are enough to usually get a politician banished for life, never mind any hint or whiff of political corruption.

Republican nominee Donald Trump has felt the burn enough this campaign cycle much to the hypocrisy. His comments calling some Mexicans immigrants criminals calling for a wall on the border with Mexico were derided as racist, but privately many who do not consider themselves racist feel the same, or rationalize it as a class issue rather one of race. The same about Muslim immigrants, many want to consider themselves open-minded, but secretly are afraid maybe some do have terrorist leanings, possibly avoiding interactions with Muslims because of their fears. The same people were outraged at Trump’s position.

Then there was Trump’s 2005 tape bragging about groping women because of celebrity status, and his failed attempt at an affair with a married woman. The tape and the 12 women accusing Trump of sexually inappropriate behavior mostly unwanted kisses and hugs nearly destroyed his campaign. The public was already writing his campaign obituary, and arguing when he refused to say whether he would concede the election. The public and news media were being presumptuous arguing and insulting over a hypothetical situation three weeks before the election when Trump did not lose yet.

The Clintons however, seem to defy every common convention, the logic goes out the door when it comes to former President Bill Clinton and former First Lady, New York Senator, Secretary of State and now Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. The Clintons have had had scandal after scandal since they entered the political sphere in the 1970 s and it has exacerbated since their entrance onto the national stage in 1992.

There have been strings of “allegations of legal or ethical wrongdoings” that have plagued the Clintons since Bill’s administration (1993–2000). The most notable being Whitewater, Paula Jones sexual harassment case, the Monica Lewinsky scandal and subsequent impeachment never mind the countless smaller ones. Through it, all Clinton maintained his high approval ratings, fiercely defended by Democratic colleagues even remaining in office after becoming only the second president ever impeached. Bill Clinton has been the exception rather than rule with politicians involved in sex scandals.

Hillary Clinton has always appeared as a Lady Macbeth, her scandals after her husband’s presidency only confirm that reputation of ruthless ambition above all. Clinton might have called her private email server as Secretary of State a convenient mistake; it was a shrewd way to manipulate her actions and political future but risking national security and giving a disgraced congressman access to it all unintentionally. Equally troubling is the blurring lines between her post at the State Department and her husbands’ Clinton Foundation. The WikiLeaks released emails from her campaign chairman John Podesta, the Democratic National Committee and others in the Clinton circle give an unappealing backstage view at the shrewd Clinton machine; that should not be ignored or dismissed.

One after the other the Clintons blamed someone else, with their favorite being the Republicans, they played the misunderstood victim, the innocents being preyed on, never truly taking responsibility for their actions. The Clintons played the American public, and in turn, they bought continuing their devotion and love affair. It either proves American voters are truly stupid or have stone age brains as historian Richard Shenkman argues, or the Clintons’ are master manipulators whose put on charm is truly inescapable.

Academics and pundits are defending Clinton’s actions, blaming sexism, Republicans or anything else. These academics and pundits would never tolerate Clinton’s behavior in their personal situations if they even suspected someone they knew behaved a similar manner they would throw stones, cut ties and blacklist making sure they are banished forever. Still, they continue to compromise their principals for an op-ed, a quote, radio or TV appearance book sales some professional attention. Too many academics and pundits see the Clintons’ scandals as fueling their careers, and they are milking it if she becomes president staying on the right side will gain them a favor. Keeping up with the popular position whether ethically sound or not shows they are morally not too far from the Clintons themselves.

There is no way to defend a criminal repeat offender, and there is no excuse for the Clintons’ repeated scandals, nothing justifies it after all this time. Former assistant FBI director James Kallstrom has come out to deride the Clintons’ repeated scandals in a recent radio interview calling the Democratic nominee a “pathological liar.” Kallstrom agrees with Comey’s decision to send the letter to Congress notifying them of the renewed investigation, saying, “The Clintons, that’s a crime family, basically. It’s like organized crime.”

It is not hatred, antipathy or anything else, upright and moral Americans, for the most part, want justice, they believe that politicians and leaders should be treated the same way they would in similar situations, the problem is the Clintons always escape that justice and that is the only reason for the animosity. They appear, act and behave like a ruling class when we live in a democracy.

Is it not because Clinton is a woman, her scandals and how far she has come, proves she plays the game better than any man does, and maybe even better than her husband. Clinton’s main advantage is as Trump accuses overusing the woman card, while she and her defenders cry out sexism; they use that as the top excuse to get away with anything. Neither is about her being a Democrat; there are many fine Democrats whose morality is without reproach including our current President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. Obama tolerates Clinton for the ambition of securing his legacy, while Biden commended FBI Director Comey and reminded the public he would have won the primary and been the nominee.

The poll results are disheartening it shows American voters particularly Democrats are cutting themselves short and have been doing so since the primaries. They want justice and morality for everyone but their future president if the name is Clinton. So many scandals, an FBI investigation over Clinton’s head, how can even the staunchest Democrat accept that after all, this time it is not a witch-hunt there has to be some truth to the accusations. I had a professor who once claimed in a seminar that it is fine to be a hypocrite as long as one knows they are. He was wrong, it is never right to be a hypocrite, it is wrong if one knows they are, and it only worse when they do not realize it, and that is this election’s greatest problem.

Bonnie K. Goodman has a BA and MLIS from McGill University and has done graduate work in religion at Concordia University. Ms Goodman is an expert inpresidential campaigns and election history and she has been covering American elections as a journalist since 2004.

Politics October 26, 2016: Trump is leading in Florida are his chances of winning improving?

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Trump is leading in Florida are his chances of winning improving?

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Source: CNBC

A major battleground state is moving into Republican Nominee Donald Trump’s column, Trump now leads in Florida. According to the latest Bloomberg Politics poll published on Wednesday morning, Oct. 26, 2016, Trump now has a slight lead over opponent Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in Florida, one of the must-win battleground state. Meanwhile, a Florida Atlantic University Business and Polling Initiative also released on Wednesday, indicates Clinton has an advantage in Florida with early voters, but Trump leads with those planning to vote on Election Day Nov. 8. The numbers show a race getting closer as Election Day approaches.

The Bloomberg Politics poll has Trump with 45 percent support from Florida voters, while Clinton has 43 percent support in a four-way race. In a two-way race, Trump has 44 percent to Clinton 44 percent support. Trump’s advantage is with independent voters in a two-way race Trump has 43 percent support from independents while Clinton has 41 percent. In a four-way race, Trump’s lead widens to 44 percent while Clinton loses 4 percent falling to 37 percent.

In contrast, the Florida Atlantic University Business and Polling Initiative has Clinton with a three-point advantage. Clinton leads 46 to Trump’s 43 percent. The poll mainly looked at early voter trends, where Clinton lead widens 54 percent to 41 percent among voters that have already voted. Trump has the advantage with voters that are waiting for Election Day 50 to 36 percent. The poll also looked at nominees’ likeability among voters, where it seems that they are choosing between the lesser of two evils. Clinton has 44 percent favorability and a 54 unfavorable rating. Trump fares worse with only 40 percent favorability and a 57 percent unfavorable rating.

The polls infuse some hope in the Trump campaign. Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway appeared on “CBS This Morning” on Wednesday determined the GOP nominee would win the state. Conway expressed, “The path would be much harder without Florida, and that’s why you’re going to see him — but we’re going to win Florida, so it’s not even part of the calculation.” According to RealClearPolitics (RCP) polling average Clinton only leads Trump by 1.6 percent in Florida.

Some national polls are indicating that Clinton is losing some of her steam after Trump’s scandals over a 2005 tape where he boasted of groping women and the 11 allegations of sexually inappropriate advances afterward, which were the most challenging stretch of his campaign. With some reliable recent polls showing the race a virtual tie. The RealClearPolitics (RCP) polling average shows Clinton’s once 7.1 percent lead dropping to 5.1 percent.

Trump is also faring well in the important must-win battleground state of Ohio. According to a Remington Research (R) poll released on Tuesday, Oct. 25, Trump leads by 4 percent, 46 to Clinton’s 42 percent. A Suffolk University poll from Thursday, Oct. 20 shows it was a tie in Ohio with Clinton and Trump both with 45 percent. Clinton’s lead is narrowing Pennsylvania with her RCP average falling from 8.7 points to 4.4 points. The latest Monmouth University poll for New Hampshire has Clinton going from a 9 point to only 4 points.

Trump senior policy adviser, Peter Navarro released a memo on Wednesday is that the tide is turning towards Trump. Navarro wrote, “The message of a candidate of change draining the swap is growing louder and louder, and it is going to get to a crescendo by Election Day.” A number factors are lowering Clinton’s numbers, Wikileaks release of campaign chairman John Podesta emails give insight into her campaign, and they do not endear her to the electorate, and the news from Tuesday, Oct. 25, that ObamaCare premiums are going to be raised by 25 percent.

The movement shows the campaign is far from over even though there are only 13 days left. CNBC senior columnist Jake Novak might have said it best in op-ed published on Wednesday, Oct. 26 “Stop it with the Clinton coronation. Trump can still win.” Novak indicates that polls show a must closer race than most pundits want to admit, while he also points to Stony Brook University Professor Helmut Norpoth, whose model successfully predicted all elections since 1912 except for 1960 claiming Trump will win.

As Novak notes, both candidates have something against them neither are liked, but Trump still is attracting larger than average crowds for his rallies showing his appeal to his base. Also going in Trump’s favor with a vast majority of Americans believing the country is moving in the “wrong direction,” Trump is campaigning as the candidate of change while Clinton is mostly campaigning as an incumbent continuing President Barack Obama’s legacy. The economy is still facing problems has been a major concern for disgruntled voters that have both supported Trump and in the Democratic primaries Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

With nearly two weeks to Election Day, Clinton supporters and some of the more liberal media can cheer and calculate her margin of victory, but the campaign is not over. Like the old sayings of counting your money before you have it or your chickens before they hatch, Clinton has not won yet. The 2016 cycle has a been a roller coaster of a campaign, one of the most volatile in history, and there might be some more surprises in store. Hopefully, only by the early hours of Nov. 9 will one candidate be declared the winner, only then can they and their supporters celebrate and bask in the glow of victory.

Bonnie K. Goodman has a BA and MLIS from McGill University and has done graduate work in religion at Concordia University. Ms Goodman is an expert in presidential campaigns and election history and she has been covering American elections as a journalist since 2004.

Politics August 25, 2016: New polls show conflicted view of 2016 race still Clinton leads Trump

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

New polls show conflicted view of 2016 race still Clinton leads Trump

By Bonnie K. Goodman

(FILE PHOTO) In this composite image a comparison has been made between former US Presidential Candidates Hillary Clinton (L) and Donald Trump.  ***LEFT IMAGE***   PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28:  Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)  ***RIGHT IMAGE***  LAS VEGAS, NV - DECEMBER 15:  Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during the CNN Republican presidential debate on December 15, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. This is the last GOP debate of the year, with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) gaining in the polls in Iowa and other early voting states and Donald Trump rising in national polls.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

(FILE PHOTO) In this composite image a comparison has been made between former US Presidential Candidates Hillary Clinton (L) and Donald Trump. ***LEFT IMAGE*** PHILADELPHIA, PA – JULY 28: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party’s nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) ***RIGHT IMAGE*** LAS VEGAS, NV – DECEMBER 15: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during the CNN Republican presidential debate on December 15, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. This is the last GOP debate of the year, with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) gaining in the polls in Iowa and other early voting states and Donald Trump rising in national polls. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Despite all the scandals surrounding Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s tenure as Secretary of State she still is leading Republican nominee Donald Trump in national polls. Two new national polls show a conflicted view of the 2016 presidential race, suggesting the race might be closer than some poll indicate. According to a new national Quinnipiac University poll released on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, Clinton leads Trump by 10 points. However, an Economist/YouGov online poll published on Wednesday, Aug. 24 Clinton leads by only 3 points within the margin of error.

The new Quinnipiac University poll, Clinton leads Trump 51 to 41 percent in a two-way race. Factoring third party candidates, Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson and Green Party nominee Jill Stein, Clinton’s lead shrinks to 7 points over Trump, 45 to 35 percent.

The numbers contrast with the latest Economist/YouGov online poll, where Clinton has the narrowest lead of all recent national polls, only three points. In the survey, Clinton has 47 percent to Trump’s 44 percent. The best national performance for Trump post-conventions. In a four-way race, Clinton’s lead expands to a point to a four percent margin, giving Clinton 42 percent to Trump’s 38 percent voter support.

Meanwhile, Clinton had her one of her largest poll margin leads of the campaign in the latest Reuters/Ipsos poll published on Tuesday, Aug. 23, with 12 points over Trump. In the survey, Clinton has 45 percent support to Trump’s 33 percent. In a four-way race, Clinton’s lead shrinks to 8 percent over Trump with 41 percent to 33 percent for the GOP nominee.

Although Reuters/Ipsos poll nearly makes the record, Clinton had her largest margin of 15 percent over Trump in the McClatchy-Marist survey released on Aug. 4, a post-Democratic convention poll, where Clinton led 48 percent to 33 percent.

In most recent polls, Clinton leads Trump by 8 to 10 percent, however, earlier this week, two other polls had Clinton leading Trump by 8 percent. In the NBC News/SurveyMonkey Weekly Election Online Tracking Poll released on Tuesday, Aug. 23, Clinton had the support of 50 percent of voters to Trump’s 42 percent. In a four-way race, Clinton only led Trump by 5 percent, 43 to 38 percent. In last week’s Reuters/Ipsos poll, Clinton had 42 percent to Trump’s 34 percent. In a four-way race, Clinton lead shrunk by one, 41 to 34 percent.

Besides the recent Economist/YouGov online poll, the only other poll where the margin the two candidates was close was the Pew Research Center poll published on Aug. 18. In that Pew poll, Clinton led Trump by only four points, 41 percent to 39 percent. This survey looked solely at a four-way race. Clinton, however, is leading in many battleground states as well.

Politics August 16, 2016: Clinton remains on top of polls leads Trump by 9 percent

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Clinton remains on top of polls leads Trump by 9 percent

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton arrives at a voter registration rally, August 16, 2016, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER        (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton arrives at a voter registration rally, August 16, 2016, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton is continuing her reign atop of the 2016 presidential election polls. According to the latest NBC News/Survey Monkey Weekly, Election Tracking Poll published on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016, Clinton leads Republican nominee Donald Trump by 9 points.

According to the NBC News poll, Clinton has 50 percent support to Trump’s 41 percent. Clinton’s lead shrinks, however, if the poll takes into account the two third party candidates, Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson and the Green Party’s Jill Stein. Then Clinton only Trump by 6 percent, 43 percent to Trump’s 37 percent. Meanwhile, Johnson would have 11 percent support and Stein with 4 percent.

Despite Clinton’s lead, the public is only supporting her because they view her as the lesser of two evils. According to the poll, the public views both candidates unfavorably, with 59 percent viewing Clinton negatively and 64 percent viewing Trump negatively. When the voters were asked about the candidate’s attributes, where they considered them, “honesty, values and temperament,” most voters said none of the above.

Clinton’s main edge over is that 42 percent of voters say the Democratic nominee has the “personality and temperament to serve” as percent only 17 percent say that about Trump. While Trump has the edge on the honesty front, 16 percent of voters think he is honest versus only 11 percent that view Clinton as honest.

Clinton has been leading Trump in every post-Democratic National Convention poll since August with margins between 8 to 10 percent depending on the poll.  According to the RealClearPolitics average of polls, Clinton has a 6.8-point advantage of Trump, 47.8 to 41 percent. Clinton is also leading in most battleground states.

Politics August 15, 2016: New Electoral College projection Clinton 288, Trump 174, 76 tossup

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

New Electoral College projection Clinton 288, Trump 174, 76 tossup

By Bonnie K. Goodman

This combination of file photos shows Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton(L)on June 15, 2016 and presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on June 13, 2016.  / AFP / dsk        (Photo credit should read DSK/AFP/Getty Images)

This combination of file photos shows Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton(L)on June 15, 2016 and presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on June 13, 2016. / AFP / dsk (Photo credit should read DSK/AFP/Getty Images)

If the polls were not enough a new Electoral College projection shows that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has the votes needs to win the election over her opponent Republican nominee Donald Trump. According to a new NBC News battleground map projection released on Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, Clinton has 288 Electoral College votes to Trump’s 174 with 76 still up in the air, 270 votes are needed to win the presidency.

The NBC News projection tallies include the states that are solidly and leaning towards the candidate. Among the states considered a tossup are Florida, Iowa, and Ohio, although according to most polls Clinton is leading in those states. Georgia and Nevada are also in the tossup column. Some states that were formerly tossup including Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Virginia, Colorado, and Michigan are now solidly Democrat.

Trump has been drowning in the polls since after the Democratic National Convention. Since then Trump’s numbers have been plummeting that he now sits between 8 and 10 points behind Clinton, who is dominating not only the national polls but also those in battleground states. According to FiveThirtyEight’s latest forecasts Clinton has an 89 percent chance of winning the election, while Trump has only an 11 percent chance.

Politics August 14, 2016: Trump blames biased news media coverage for bad poll numbers

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Trump blames biased news media coverage for bad poll numbers

By Bonnie K. Goodman

FAIRFIELD, CT - AUGUST 13:  Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump acknowledges the high temperature after addressing supporters on August 13, 2016 in Fairfield, Connecticut. Thousands of people in the traditionally Democratic-leaning state came out to see Trump speak at Sacred Heart University.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

FAIRFIELD, CT – AUGUST 13: Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump acknowledges the high temperature after addressing supporters on August 13, 2016 in Fairfield, Connecticut. Thousands of people in the traditionally Democratic-leaning state came out to see Trump speak at Sacred Heart University. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is blaming the news media for his weak poll numbers. Trump began his attack on the media on a Saturday evening, Aug. 13, 2016, rally in Fairfield, Connecticut, and continued to rant against the media in a series of tweets on Sunday, Aug. 14.

Trump began expressing this sentiment at a Fairfield, Connecticut rally Saturday evening, telling supporters, “I’m not running against crooked Hillary Clinton. I’m running against the crooked media.”

Then in a series of tweets on Sunday morning, Aug. 14 Trump blasted the media for bias, attacking him and shielding Clinton. Trump wrote in the morning, “If the disgusting and corrupt media covered me honestly and didn’t put false meaning into the words I say, I would be beating Hillary by 20%.”

Continuing, Trump tweeted in the afternoon, “It is not “freedom of the press” when newspapers and others are allowed to say and write whatever they want even if it is completely false!” and “Crooked Hillary Clinton is being protected by the media. She is not a talented person or politician. The dishonest media refuses to expose!”

Trump believes the media skews what he says but ignores his larger message. In a tweet from Sunday evening, he wrote, “My rallies are not covered properly by the media. They never discuss the real message and never show crowd size or enthusiasm.”

The news media has been biased against Trump, over-analyzing every word he said, but letting Clinton’s scandals and potential abuse of power during her State Department tenure go with minimal coverage. The scrutiny is impossible to live up to, with the media emphasizing out of context sound bites rather Trump’s larger message or even as he pointed out his rallies and a large number of supporters present. No matter what Clinton does, the media does not find fault, but according to them, everything Trump does is wrong.

Politics July 25, 2016: Trump overtakes Clinton leads with post-GOP convention poll bump

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Trump overtakes Clinton leads with post-GOP convention poll bump

By Bonnie K. Goodman

CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 21:  Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a speech during the evening session on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

CLEVELAND, OH – JULY 21: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a speech during the evening session on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump received the number of votes needed to secure the party’s nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

GOP nominee Donald Trump is basking in the post-convention glow. Now Trump is leading rival presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in new polls released on Monday, July 25, 2016, the first day of the Democratic convention. Trump leads by three points in a new CNN/ORC poll, published on Monday, and Trump now ties with Clinton in the latest CBS News poll also released Monday. Election forecaster Nate Silver is also predicting that Trump could win now if the election happened today.

According to the new CNN/ORC poll, Trump gained six percent support post-convention. Now Trump is leading Clinton 48 to 45 percent. In the last CNN poll, Clinton had a 7-point lead 49 to 42 percent. In a four-way race with Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson and the Green Party’s Jill Stein, Trump leads Clinton by five percent, 44 to 39 percent, showing a reversal of fortune.

Trump’s favorability and perception of honesty and trustworthiness are also increasing post-convention. Among voters, 46 percent view him favorably up 7 points, while 43 percent find him honest and trustworthy up four points, and now 39 percent would be proud to have President Trump up 7 points. American voters still find Clinton not honest or trustworthy, with 68 percent feeling that way.

According to the new CBS News survey, Trump and Clinton are tied at 42 percent. The CBS poll looked at the improved post-GOP convention “perception” of Trump, with 50 percent “feeling better” about the GOP nominee. Unfortunately, 58 percent of voters still think Trump is “unprepared for the presidency.” Unlike the CNN poll 56 percent do not think Trump is honest, and “61 percent said he lacks the temperament and personality” for the presidency. Meanwhile, 50 percent think Clinton is prepared for the presidency, think she is a strong leader and has the temperament to be president. Still, 66 percent deem her untrustworthy.

The poll good news continues with the latest RealClearPolitics average of polls, which gives Trump a slight advantage over Clinton of 0.2 points, with Trump having 44.1 percent to Clinton’s 43.9 percent.

Statistician Nate Silver on his site FiveThirtyEight is now predicting that Trump could win the election if it were held today. Silver tweeted, “If the election were today, Trump would likely win. But Clinton’s still favored long-term: https://t.co/2uB2oqpXy4 pic.twitter.com/HUTQMaVrBx – FiveThirtyEight (@FiveThirtyEight) July 25, 2016″ Trump’s odds to win are 57.5 percent to Clinton’s 42.5 percent. The prediction comes after two forecasts that gave Trump less than a 25 percent of winning the election in November.

Politics April 26, 2016: Trump hits 50 percent support virtually tied with Clinton in general election

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Trump hits 50 percent support virtually tied with Clinton in general election

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 26, 2016 6:12 AM MST

GOP front-runner Donald Trump is gaining momentum among Republicans and in the general election against presumed rival Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton, April 26, 2016
GOP front-runner Donald Trump is gaining momentum among Republicans and in the general election against presumed rival Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton, April 26, 2016
Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Politics April 16, 2016: Sanders would beat likely GOP nominee Trump in a general election

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders would beat likely GOP nominee Trump in a general election

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 16, 2016 4:54 PM MST

Democratic candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is the strongest and most liked candidate running this election cycle according to a new CBS News poll, April 15, 2016
Democratic candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is the strongest and most liked candidate running this election cycle according to a new CBS News poll, April 15, 2016
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Politics April 9, 2016: New poll if Trump is not nominee GOP certain to lose election to Democrats

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

New poll if Trump is not nominee GOP certain to lose election to Democrats

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 9, 2016 12:32 PM MST

 If the Republican Party prevents frontrunner Donald Trump from the nomination, they could be facing a revolt from his supporters, April 9, 2016
If the Republican Party prevents frontrunner Donald Trump from the nomination, they could be facing a revolt from his supporters, April 9, 2016
Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

Politics April 7, 2016: New frontrunner? Sanders leads Clinton nationally as campaign gains momentum

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

New frontrunner? Sanders leads Clinton nationally as campaign gains momentum

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 7, 2016 4:04 AM MST

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders now leads Hillary Clinton nationally according to a new poll that suggests deep divisions within the Democratic Party, April 5, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders now leads Hillary Clinton nationally according to a new poll that suggests deep divisions within the Democratic Party, April 5, 2016
Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Politics April 4, 2016: Sanders leads Clinton by 8 points a day before Wisconsin primary

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders leads Clinton by 8 points a day before Wisconsin primary

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 4, 2016 12:37 PM MST

Democratic candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is widening his lead in Wisconsin a day before the primary, April 4, 2016
Democratic candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is widening his lead in Wisconsin a day before the primary, April 4, 2016
Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

Politics March 22, 2016: Clinton, Trump are the most disliked presidential candidates in recent history

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Clinton, Trump are the most disliked presidential candidates in recent history

By Bonnie K. Goodman

March 22, 2016 7:15 PM MST

 GOP frontrunner Donald Trump is the most disliked candidate in recent history, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton is not too far behind, March 22, 2016
GOP frontrunner Donald Trump is the most disliked candidate in recent history, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton is not too far behind, March 22, 2016
Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Politics March 9, 2016: Sanders wins Michigan primary in biggest primary polling upset in history

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders wins Michigan primary in biggest primary polling upset in history

By Bonnie K. Goodman

March 8, 2016 11:13 PM MST

Bernie Sanders regained momentum last night,picking up a big win in Michigan's primary contest over rival Hillary Clinton. Craig Boswell has the latest. (1:55)	WCCO This Morning – March 9, 2016

Play
Bernie Sanders regained momentum last night,picking up a big win in Michigan’s primary contest over rival Hillary Clinton. Craig Boswell has the latest. (1:55) WCCO This Morning – March 9, 2016
on.aol.com

Politics March 1, 2016: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton set for big wins on Super Tuesday

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton set for big wins on Super Tuesday

By Bonnie K. Goodman

March 1, 2016 7:09 AM MST

March 1 -- Voters head to the polls in 13 states as part of primaries and caucuses in Super Tuesday contests as Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio look to make a strong showing in the Republican race behind front-runner Donald Trump. Bloomberg's Megan Murphy...

Play
March 1 — Voters head to the polls in 13 states as part of primaries and caucuses in Super Tuesday contests as Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio look to make a strong showing in the Republican race behind front-runner Donald Trump. Bloomberg’s Megan Murphy…
on.aol.com

Politics February 29, 2016: Trump and Clinton are beating their opponents before Super Tuesday

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Trump and Clinton are beating their opponents before Super Tuesday

By Bonnie K. Goodman

February 29, 2016 3:26 PM MST

NORFOLK, Va. — Hours before voters in 11 states, including Virginia, hold Democratic nominating contests on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton set her sights on the general election. The former secretary of state's stump speech spent little time on her rival, S...

Play
NORFOLK, Va. — Hours before voters in 11 states, including Virginia, hold Democratic nominating contests on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton set her sights on the general election. The former secretary of state’s stump speech spent little time on her rival, S…
on.aol.com

Politics February 28, 2016: Projection Trump wins popular and Electoral College vote against Clinton

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Projection Trump wins popular and Electoral College vote against Clinton

By Bonnie K. Goodman

February 28, 2016 12:09 PM MST

The Republicans win the presidential election with a majority only if Donald Trump is their nominee according to a statistical model that has been right for the past 100 years, Feb. 21, 2016
The Republicans win the presidential election with a majority only if Donald Trump is their nominee according to a statistical model that has been right for the past 100 years, Feb. 21, 2016
Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Politics February 18, 2016: Clinton gets desperate steals superdelegates as Sanders tops first national poll

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Clinton gets desperate steals superdelegates as Sanders tops first national poll

By Bonnie K. Goodman

February 18, 2016 10:29 PM MST

Bernie Sanders is topping the Democratic polls, while Hillary Clinton gets desperate as she grabs up as many delegates as possible before the public gets to vote, Feb. 18, 2016
Bernie Sanders is topping the Democratic polls, while Hillary Clinton gets desperate as she grabs up as many delegates as possible before the public gets to vote, Feb. 18, 2016
Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Politics February 17, 2016: Cruz takes away frontrunner status from Trump tops new national poll

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Cruz takes away frontrunner status from Trump tops new national poll

By Bonnie K. Goodman

February 17, 2016 4:49 PM MST

 Is Ted Cruz's new national poll lead over Donald Trump a trend or just a blip in Trump's road to the GOP presidential nomination, Feb. 17, 2016
Is Ted Cruz’s new national poll lead over Donald Trump a trend or just a blip in Trump’s road to the GOP presidential nomination, Feb. 17, 2016
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Politics February 5, 2016: Sanders, Clinton almost tied, Sanders, Rubio do best in general election matchup

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders, Clinton almost tied, Sanders, Rubio do best in general election matchup

By Bonnie K. Goodman

February 5, 2016 4:08 PM MST

Both Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Marco Rubio are gaining the most ground in the latest national poll after the Iowa caucuses, Feb. 5, 2016
Both Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Marco Rubio are gaining the most ground in the latest national poll after the Iowa caucuses, Feb. 5, 2016
Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Politics February 1, 2016: Prediction Trump and Sanders could win Iowa caucuses according to last poll

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Prediction Trump and Sanders could win Iowa caucuses according to last poll 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

February 1, 2016 11:34 AM MST

 First-time voters could catapult GOP frontrunner Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders to win the Iowa caucuses according to a new Quinnipiac University Poll, Feb. 1, 2016
First-time voters could catapult GOP frontrunner Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders to win the Iowa caucuses according to a new Quinnipiac University Poll, Feb. 1, 2016
Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Politics January 16, 2016: No-so-secret weapon Bill Clinton is not helping Hillary’s presidential campaign

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

No-so-secret weapon Bill Clinton is not helping Hillary’s presidential campaign 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 16, 2016 4:48 PM MST

Politics January 11, 2016: Sanders leads in NH ties in Iowa makes Clinton nervous threatens her coronation

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders leads in NH ties in Iowa makes Clinton nervous threatens her coronation

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 10, 2016 5:02 PM MST

 Two new polls show Bernie Sanders could beat Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton in crucial early primary states Iowa and New Hampshire threatening to derail her inevitable nomination, which is making Clinton nervous, Jan. 10, 2016
Two new polls show Bernie Sanders could beat Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton in crucial early primary states Iowa and New Hampshire threatening to derail her inevitable nomination, which is making Clinton nervous, Jan. 10, 2016
Photo by Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Comedy Central

Politics December 22, 2015: New poll says a Donald Trump presidency would be an embarrassment for the US

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

New poll says a Donald Trump presidency would be an embarrassment for the US

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 22, 2015 9:28 PM MST

 Donald Trump is still leading in the polls, but would have a hard time beating the Democratic nominee, and half the voters think his presidency would embarrass the nation, Dec. 22, 2015
Donald Trump is still leading in the polls, but would have a hard time beating the Democratic nominee, and half the voters think his presidency would embarrass the nation, Dec. 22, 2015
Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images