History February 14, 2020: Sanders’s views on Judaism similar to the last Jew as close to presidency Judah Benjamin

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

HISTORY

Sanders’s views on Judaism similar to the last Jew as close to presidency Judah Benjamin

Bonnie K. Goodman

Bonnie K. Goodman Feb 14

Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

In an unfamiliar sight, Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders lights a Hanukkah menorah wearing a kippah at a Des Moines, Iowa event, December 29, 2019. Kelsey Kremer/The Register

With his victory in the New Hampshire primary, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders became the frontrunner for the Democratic Presidential nomination.[1] Sanders would become the first Jew to hold the distinction and become that close to capturing the presidency. Sanders is not a practicing Jew and withheld from discussing his Judaism during his 2016 run for the Democratic nomination and only recently he has made his religious identity a central focus in his campaign. In a January 2020 New York Times interview with Sanders, when asked about believing in God Sanders declared, “I am Jewish, I am proud to be Jewish. I was bar mitzvahed from the Kings Highway Jewish Center, a long time ago. I am not actively involved in organized religion. I believe in God. I believe in the universality of people. That what happens to you impacts me. And I certainly believe in the constitutional right of freedom of religion. And I will strongly defend that.”[2] In 2015, in an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Kimmel asked Sanders the same question, to which he replied, “I am what I am. And what I believe in, and what my spirituality is about, is that we’re all in this together.” [3] Sanders’s Jewish co-religionists are not enthusiastic about the prospect of him becoming the first Jewish Democratic nominee and he is their fourth choice among the Democratic presidential candidates.

In American history, only one other Jew has come so close to the presidency, Judah P. Benjamin. Benjamin served in three cabinet posts in the Confederate States of America government; the country formed with the Southern states seceded from the Union, a catalyst for the Civil War to preserve the union. The wife of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Varina Davis in her memoirs acknowledged Benjamin, “The President promoted him to the State Department with a personal and aggrieved sense of injustice done to the man who had now become his friend and right hand.” [4] Benjamin was indispensable to Davis, working ten to twelve hours a day by his side, serving as a speechwriter and trusted confident. Benjamin biographer Eli N. Evans author of Judah P. Benjamin, the Jewish Confederate went as far as to claim Benjamin sometimes served as a surrogate or acting president of the Confederacy.

Benjamin was the first Jewish Senator, the first Jew nominated and confirmed to the Supreme Court, and he was nominated to be the Ambassador to Spain an honor for a Jew, who came from a prominent Spanish Jewish family, and who traced their lineage to before the expulsion. The Confederacy had been welcoming to religious minorities, Benjamin, who was Jewish married into a successful Louisiana Creole and Catholic family excelled in an increasingly Protestant Christian evangelical majority. In the South and the Senate, Benjamin was a brilliant jurist, orator, a plantation owner, and a sugar cane cultivator. During the Civil War, Benjamin was “the brains of the Confederacy,” the Jew at “the very center of Southern history,” “in the eye of the storm that was the Civil War,” who remained in the “shadow” but took the fall as the Confederacy failed in the war. [5] Through it, all Benjamin refused to discuss his Jewish identity, anti-Semitism followed him throughout his political career and his actions in the Confederate cabinet caused an eruption of anti-Jewish prejudice in the North and mostly in the South, where the Jewish population had lived in harmony with their Christian neighbors.

Sanders also shares with Benjamin a reluctance to discuss his Jewish identity, which involved a religious childhood followed filled with Hebrew school and a Bar Mitzvah to marrying into a Catholic family and remaining Jewish in name only as a way to advance his political career in a Christian America. Sanders left out his Judaism, throughout the 2016 presidential campaign against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, only to be trounced by Jewish voters. Sanders addressed his Judaism on the 2020-campaign trail in November 2019 with an article in the leftist Jewish publication the Jewish Currants “How to Fight Antisemitism,” Sanders declared, “I am a proud Jewish American.”

The threat of antisemitism is not some abstract idea to me. It is very personal. It destroyed a large part of my family. I am not someone who spends a lot of time talking about my personal background because I believe political leaders should focus their attention on a vision and agenda for others, rather than themselves. But I also appreciate that it’s important to talk about how our backgrounds have informed our ideas, our principles, and our values.

I am a proud Jewish American. My father emigrated from Poland to the United States in 1921 at the age of 17 to escape the poverty and widespread antisemitism of his home country. Those in his family who remained in Poland after Hitler came to power were murdered by the Nazis. I know very well where white supremacist politics leads, and what can happen when people do not speak up against it. [6]

Sanders has increasingly discussed his Judaism in the weeks leading up to the all-important Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary turning his religion from a negative into a positive. Then Sanders debuted a new image at a Hanukkah celebration at the Brenton Skating Plaza in Des Moines, Iowa, the site of the first nominating contest, where Sanders would go to come-in a close second in a dead heat race against Pete Buttigieg, the Former Mayor of South Bend, Indiana. On December 29, 2019, at the event Sanders denounced the recent anti-Semitic attack at a New York rabbi’s home in Monsey, lite the giant Hanukkah menorah, sang Hanukkah songs, and most startling wore a kippah.[7] In his remarks, Sanders discussed anti-Semitism a new staple on the campaign trail:

“What we are seeing right now — we’re seeing it in America and we’re seeing it all over the world — is a rise in anti-Semitism. We’re seeing a rise in hate crimes in this country. We’re seeing somebody run into a kid here in Des Moines because that child was a Latino. We’re seeing people being stabbed yesterday in New York City because they were Jewish. We are seeing people being assaulted because they are Muslim. … If there was ever a time in American history where we say no to religious bigotry, now is the time. If there was ever a time where we say no to divisiveness, now is the moment.”[8]

On January 25, 2020, Sanders’s campaign released a four-minute video on his Twitter feed about his Jewish identity, it included excerpts from Sanders’s October 2019 speech to J Street, “the liberal Jewish Middle East policy group,” annual conference and his campaign’s Jewish outreach director Joel Rubin, a former Barack Obama official, commentating. The video complete with Yiddish slang, “kishkes,” begins with Sanders declaring; “I’m very proud to be Jewish and look forward to becoming the first Jewish president in the history of this country.” [9]

The video was meant to contrast Sanders with Republican President Donald Trump’s tolerance of white nationalism and anti-Semitism. Rubin narrates, “We live in a perilous time where not only are white nationalists attacking our synagogues and raising hate speech on the internet, we have a white nationalist right now sitting in the White House. We need to have someone in office who gets it, gets it in his kishkes, understands what it really means to ensure that we are healing our world.” [10] At the J-Street conference, Sanders also referenced anti-Semitism, saying, “If there is any people on Earth who understands the dangers of racism and white nationalism, it is certainly the Jewish people. And if there is any people on Earth who should do everything humanly possible to fight against Trump’s efforts to try to divide us up … and bring people together around a common and progressive agenda, it is the Jewish people.”[11]

On Thursday, February 6, 2020, speaking at a CNN town hall for Democratic presidential candidates in New Hampshire, Sanders answered an audience question about his Jewish identity being “a help or a hindrance” as he runs for the presidency. Sanders responded to his Judaism, “impacts me very profoundly. When I try to think about the views that I came to hold there are two factors. One I grew up in a family that didn’t have a lot of money … and the second one is being Jewish…. At a very early age, even before my political thoughts were developed, I was aware of the horrible things that human beings can do to other people in the name of racism or white nationalism, or in this case Nazism.”[12]

On the campaign trail, the most surprising Sanders’s allies and shave been touting his Judaism, among them Palestinian activist Linda Sarsour, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Professor Cornel West. At a September 2019 campaign rally, Sarsour declared, “I would be so proud to win, but also to make history and elect the first Jewish American president this country has ever seen and for his name to be Bernard Sanders.” [13] At a pre-New Hampshire primary event on Monday, February 10, 2020, West, expressed, “We got a deep Jewish brother named Bernie Sanders who is bringing us together.” West supports the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) movement and questions the Jewish historical claim to Israel.[14]

Sanders’s position on Israel is also troubling and he is overtly critical especially of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government. Sanders declares he is pro-Israel, writing, “I have a connection to Israel going back many years. In 1963, I lived on a kibbutz near Haifa. It was there that I saw and experienced for myself many of the progressive values upon which Israel was founded.” However, Sanders has sympathies with the Palestinians’ viewpoint, rights and “their displacement,” calling the Israeli settlements an occupation. Sanders’s plans threaten American military aid and funding to Israel making it contingent on their treatment of Palestinians, justifying it by saying, “$3.8 billion is a lot of money, and we cannot give it carte blanche to the Israeli government.” [15] Sanders claims that kind of criticism “does not “delegitimize” Israel any more than acknowledging the sober facts of America’s own founding delegitimizes the United States.” [16] At the J-Street conference, Sanders justified his criticism, claiming, “It’s going to be very hard for anybody to call me — whose father’s family was wiped out by Hitler — anti-Semitic.”[17]

American Jews have reluctant to support Sanders partially because of his campaign surrogates who have a history of making anti-Semitic and anti-Israel remarks and Sanders’s position on Israel. A January 2020, Pew Research Center poll finds that only 11 percent of Jewish members of the Democratic Party intends to vote for Sanders in the primaries. Sanders garners most of his support from “religiously unaffiliated Democrats, self-described atheists and agnostics,” and from Muslims than he does from Jewish Democrats. [18] Jewish Journal Political Editor Shmuel Rosner points out, “Still, it is clear that he is not the Jews’ preferred cup of tea. For many Israelis, a Sanders presidency seems like a nightmare. Sanders says he is “proud to be Jewish” but many Jews find it hard to feel the same pride as they look at him.” [19] The New York Times in their interview with Sanders noted his different views on his religion and his place in history. The Editorial Board indicated, “Senator Sanders is religiously an anomaly among the candidates, for several reasons — if elected, he would be the first Jewish president, and also one of few who have openly discussed a disconnect from organized religion. He attended Hebrew school as a boy and spent time in Israel on a kibbutz, but has said he does not have a regular religious practice.” [20]

In contrast, to Sanders’s recent declaration about his Jewish identity, Judah Benjamin supposedly only once declared his Jewishness in his political career on the Senate floor; however, historians dispute the occurrences since it was out of caricature for Benjamin. Benjamin chose not to discuss his Judaism but it followed him and he was the target of anti-Semitic attacks from colleagues and political enemies alike. Benjamin was the consummate insider and outsider as a Jew at both times. Sanders too shares the distinction of being an outsider in the American Jewish community and among Jewish voters.

Judah P. Benjamin

In March 1858, while Benjamin delivered a speech supporting Kansas being admitted to the Union as a slave state supposedly, Republican Senator Benjamin F. Wade of Ohio “denounced” Benjamin on the Senate floor calling him, “an Israelite with Egyptian principle.” Wade stated, “Why sir, when old Moses, under immediate inspiration of God Almighty, enticed a whole nation of slaves, and ran away, not to Canada to old Canaan, I suppose Pharaoh and all the chivalry of old Egypt denounced him as a most furious abolitionist… there were not those who loved Egypt better than they loved liberty… They were not exactly Northern men with Southern principles, but they were Israelites with Egyptian principles.”

To which Benjamin supposedly responded, “It is true that I am a Jew, and when my ancestors were receiving their Ten Commandments from the immediate Deity, amidst the thundering and lightning of Mt. Sinai, the ancestors of my opponent were herding swine in the forests of Great Britain.” [21] Although attributed to Benjamin, Benjamin never acknowledged his Jewishness in issues in the Senate that affected American Jews. Historian Bertram W. Korn does not believe that Benjamin delivered this remark. According to Korn, “The fact that Benjamin did not feel obliged, in either of these cases, to register himself as a Jew would appear to be much more significant than any of the questionable traditions and legends concerning allegedly defiant answers to which he is purported to have made to any anti-Jewish attacks upon himself.” [22] Evans also questions Benjamin’s declaration, since historians have told “ four different versions” of the anecdote and “the quote cannot be verified.” Still, Evans notes “the statement remains a part of the legend of Judah P. Benjamin, even though it indicates an uncharacteristic acknowledgment in public of his Jewishness.”[23]

The Benjamin family was not Orthodox and kept their store open on the Sabbath, and they did adhere to the daily religious rituals. Judah’s father Phillip Benjamin “was an intellectual” and “well versed in Jewish law.” Phillip was one of the founders of Charleston’s first Reform synagogue, the Reform Society of Israelites after he and 46 other members of Congregation Beth Elohim petitioned the synagogue to among other reforms modernize prayers using English, shorten the prayers, and include an English sermon in the service. The petitioners looked to anglicize Judaism in Protestant Charleston. Evans indicates, “As a son of one of the leaders of the society Judah understandably would have been deeply affected by the religious divisions. The reform movement was not just for adults, it sought to influence history through the children of its members and the generations to come.”[24] When Judah turned thirteen in 1824, he participated in a confirmation ceremony rather than a bar mitzvah. Phillip Benjamin served on the committee of correspondence of the new congregation. The family’s religious observance was lax, especially because of financial needs Phillip kept his store open on the Sabbath. In 1827, even under reform rules the new congregation “ousted” the Benjamins from the synagogue for not observing the Sabbath.[25]

Despite his non-observance, Benjamin remained a Jew his whole life although he was never attended or a member in a synagogue or involved in the Jewish community of any city he lived throughout his adult life in America or Britain. According to Korn in his article, “Judah P. Benjamin as a Jew,” “Altogether it would appear that Benjamin had no positive or active interest in Jews or Judaism. The only known facts are that he was born into a Jewish family… that he never denied being Jewish or sought to escape his background through conversion to the Catholic faith of his wife and daughter.” [26] “More recently Evans claims, “To presume Benjamin a nonbeliever by his public acts represents a fundamental error in Southern history.” Evans believes Benjamin could not cut ties completely with his Judaism after his religious upbringing, arguing, “No Jew can make the leap from a childhood with religious immigrant parents to an assimilated Southern leader in twenty years, without retaining psychological ties to his Jewish past.” [27]

The lack of personal sources about Benjamin makes it even more difficult to analyze his personal feelings about his Jewish identity as opposed to the public reticence available from the scarce sources. To Catharine MacMillan, in her article, “Judah Benjamin: marginalized outsider or admitted insider?,” “This failure is significant not only in the understanding of Benjamin’s life but also in a greater understanding of one of the most prominent Jewish figures in the nineteenth-century English speaking world. This prevents a greater understanding of the acceptance of Jewish people in America and the United Kingdom.” [28] Benjamin’s success was because of his passionate loyalty to Southern issues and his ability to downplay his religion. Despite Benjamin assimilating to Southern white Christian society, the anti-Semitic attacks towards Benjamin both before and especially during the Civil War gave rise to widespread anti-Jewish prejudice in the South. Historians will never know how he felt about the personal attacks or how he felt about his actions in the cabinet were affecting the wider Jewish community in the South.

The very little record does not indicate if he had any pride in being Jewish or involvement after his childhood. Whitaker in his Sketches of Life and Character in Louisiana, The Portraits Selected Principally from the Bench and Bar noted in 1847 that the public was aware that Benjamin was Jewish, writing, “Mr. Benjamin is by birth, and as his names imports, an Israelite. Yet how far he still adheres to the religion of his fathers, I cannot tell, though I should doubt whether the matter troubled him much.” [29] One incident indicates that Benjamin took an interest in the community; he purchased a subscription to the Philadelphia Rabbi Isaac Leeser’s newspaper The Occident and American Jewish Advocate. On March 20, 1848, Gershom Kursheedt, the leader of the New Orleans Jewish community notified Leeser in a letter that “Before I forget it let me state on Friday last Mr. J.P. Benjamin handed me $5.50 for you.” In 1843, Leeser sent free copies to influential Jews so they would purchase a subscription to his magazine. Benjamin was not as distanced to know the leader of the community and his connection to Leeser and to want to be current on Jewish issues.

Jewish leaders looked to claim Benjamin as a member of the Jewish community more than Benjamin wished to identify publicly with his religion. Two stories circulated that embellished his involvement. The first attributed to Isaac Mayer Wise, who claimed in the fall of 1850 to have had two discussions with Benjamin, Secretary of State Daniel Webster and Lieutenant Matthew F. Maury. In 1874, Wise recounts in his memoir, Reminisces he discussed religion and Judaism with Benjamin in the two meetings, the first in Webster’s office then later at dinner. Korn believes the discussions did not occur because Benjamin became a Senator in 1853, while Webster died in 1852, and Benjamin did not visit Washington in the fall of 1850 but July 1851. Wise contradicted his story in a response to a Boston Transcript editorial from January 5, 1861, which criticized Jews, Benjamin, Senator David (Levy) Yulee and Benjamin Mordecai of Charleston for contributing to the secession crisis, Benjamin and Yulee through their Senate actions and Mordecai with a monetary contribution. Wise responded Jews were divided politically and that he had only met Mordecai. Neither did Wise mention meeting Benjamin in his obituary for Benjamin in the Israelite.

Years later, Herbert Ezekiel author of the book The History of the Jews of Richmond from 1769 to 1917 (1917) claimed in 1860 that while Benjamin was in San Francisco arguing the mining case United States V. Castillero, he delivered a sermon at a San Francisco synagogue for Yom Kippur, on September 26. The United States V. Castillero was one of Benjamin’s most important cases in front of the Supreme Court concerned with “the ownership of the New Almaden quicksilver mine in California.” [30] Ezekiel quoted Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise of Cincinnati. Wise had not been San Francisco that year and neither did the only Jewish paper The Weekly Gleaner claim Benjamin was anywhere near a synagogue let alone deliver a Yom Kippur sermon.

Two days earlier Rev, Julius Eckman of The Weekly Gleaner reported Benjamin delivered a lecture on politics and government at Tucker’s Academy for an Episcopal Church. The speech, however, did mention American Jewry, Eckman reported Benjamin made rare comments speaking out against political discrimination. Gleaner wrote, “He next referred in a very happy manner to the injustice in the distribution of offices and asked why the citizens of his religious tenets were not favored by those who have it in their power to bestow offices of emolument and trust. In a very pathetic manner, he asked ‘Would the great Washington have excluded a citizen from holding federal appointment because of his religion.’” [31]

Ezekiel believed Benjamin’s speech was delivered as a Yom Kippur sermon, Korn, however, indicates the speech must have been one Benjamin delivered to the Church of Advent. Korn claims the official printed version of the speech referred to “the spoils system and political prejudice, not religious prejudice.” Korn argues Eckman was either drowsy that evening and did not hear Benjamin right, or he was so eager to identify Benjamin as a positive Jew that he misinterpreted what the Louisiana Senator did say.” [32] Korn’s basis for his analysis was because Benjamin never spoke about himself in his address or anything related to Judaism in his addresses, quoting Jefferson Davis who claimed, “No more reticent man ever lived where it was possible to be silent.”

Without many records, it is difficult to say for certain. Despite Korn debunking the Benjamin quote, Eckman’s paraphrasing of Benjamin speaks volumes on why he, for the most part, stayed away from Judaism in his public life, his fear his religion would hold his ambition back from political advancement. Historian Diane Ashton explains the situation for Southern Jews during the Civil War in her article “Shifting Veils: Religion, Politics, and Womanhood Among Jewish Women During the Civil War.” Ashton writes, “When the determination of friend or foe was the degree to which an individual displayed shared values and commitments and when religion was made to serve political causes, Jewish identity could be a liability or an asset.” [33] With the array of anti-Semitic attacks on Benjamin from his political foes, he long learned that assimilation and keeping his religious difference private was best for his political advancement.

Two later incidents while Benjamin served in the Senate, however, demonstrated just how distanced publicly he was from his religion. In 1850, the “American Minster to Switzerland” A. Dudley Moore negotiated a commercial treaty with the Swiss Confederation. An article in the treaty allowed Swiss cantons the right to refuse Jews’ entry and not allow them to benefit from the treaty, only Christians, and included the ability to expel any Jew conducting business in their canton. Secretary of State Daniel Webster and Senator Henry Clay opposed the clause and President Millard Fillmore wanted the clause removed from the treaty.

The controversy became known as L’Affaire Swiss. Rabbinical leaders in both North and South opposed the anti-Semitic clause and lobbied the government to advocate religious tolerance abroad. Among those leading the movement were “Rabbis Isaac Leeser of Philadelphia, David Einhorn of Baltimore, J. M. Cardozo of Charleston, and Capt. Jonas Phillips Levy of New York.” Former Representative Phillip Phillips of Alabama and Jonas Levy advocated the government on behalf of American Jews. In the Senate, Senator Lewis Cass of Michigan led a movement opposed to ratifying the treaty. Cass would later become Secretary of State and notably delivered a speech on the Senate floor on April 19, 1854, placing his support in America’s Jewish population.

Benjamin, however, refused to be involved in the Senate floor debate; instead, he did not identify himself as a Jew that would have been subjected to the treaty’s exemption. Benjamin presented the petition on May 10, 1854, on the Senate floor, he advocated for equality in the treaty but Benjamin chose not to include that he too was a Jew, excluding himself from his coreligionists. According to the Congressional Globe from the day, “Mr. Benjamin resented… a petition of citizens of the United States, professing the Jewish religion, praying that measures be taken to secure to American citizens of every religious creed, residing or traveling abroad, their civil and religious rights; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.” [34] The clause was rewritten but it still allowed the Swiss to discriminate against Jews. What had been an objection became a protest movement by American Jews, the situation only grew when an American citizen and Jew, A. H. Gootman, who conducted commercial business for five years was forced to leave La Chaux-de-Fonds, in Neuchâtel in 1856.

Except for presenting the petition, Benjamin chose not to take on a leadership role; historians suggest he felt it better for non-Jewish Senate members to take on that position. However, it was often the practice of some Jews in the South to “veil” as historian Diane Ashton called it, their religion in front of their Christian neighbors. If he would have taken on a leadership role he would have been known as the “Jewish Senator,” and he worked his whole career not to be defined or hindered by his Judaism. [35] In 1860, Benjamin remained just as detached, when China and Japan put similar clauses in their treaties with America only allowing Christians to worship freely. Again, Jewish leaders objected to the included clauses and lobbied that any American of any faith should have their right. Rabbi Max Lilienthal wrote to Benjamin looking for him to advocate in the Senate on American Jewry’s behalf. Benjamin replied:

Washington, March 24, 1860

My dear Sir:

I have received your favor of the 21st inst., and shall be watchful of the China treaty, in order to take care that by no omission shall the Israelites of the United States be debarred the privilege secured by the treaty to their Christian fellow citizens.

Thank you for your complimentary expression toward myself, I remain,

Yours with great respect,

J.P. Benjamin.

Rev. Dr. Lilienthal.

Benjamin’s reply was detached from the situation, although he agreed to advocate, he did not include himself as one of the aggrieved Jews.

Benjamin would the ultimate political insider but he spent his life as a Jew on the outside from his religion and community. Benjamin remained an outsider as a Jew, who like the rest of the Southern Jewish population tried to be more devoted, loyal and fervent in all the South’s institutions and social constructs to avoid anti-Jewish prejudice. Legal scholar Catharine MacMillan even concurs, “Benjamin’s life, it is also argued, demonstrates how some individuals can ‘overcome’ the initial marginalization which attends the circumstances of their birth to move within the mainstream of society.”[36] Historians agree that Benjamin’s ability to turn his “weakness into strength” led to his success and his “perseverance in the face of adversity.” [37] Benjamin died on May 6, 1884, although he remained a non-observant Jew, his wife Natalie St-Martin Benjamin had a Catholic priest administer last rites on Benjamin before he died, had his funeral services in a church and buried him at the St Martin family crypt at Père Lachaise Cemetery.

The United States is probably the most polarized politically it has been since before the Civil War, the ideological war between the left and right has widened into a chasm. Sanders has found being a Democratic socialist his new religion, his adherence to the ideology has helped him propel to the top of the candidates and gained him popularity among the growing progressives within the party. Benjamin too molded to the Southern social and political norms to rise the political ladder, he supported and defended slavery, states’ rights, and then secession to reach the heights of power in the South. Evans describes, “Benjamin as a Jew would have to be more loyal to the Cause than anyone else — more outspoken in the Cabinet, more courageous, and willing to wage war with the energy that total war demanded. And if he understood Jefferson Davis, loyalty to the President as the symbol to the Cause was the measure of a man’s worth to the Confederacy.” [38] Loyalty and adherence to America’s new political norms and downplaying their Judaism are the reasons both Benjamin and Sanders were able to advance in their political career despite their religion, now Sanders has the chance to use Benjamin’s strategy to reach what has until now elusive for Jews, the pinnacle of power in the U.S, the presidency.

SOURCES

Downey, Arthur T. The Creole Affair: The Slave Rebellion That Led the U.S. and Great Britain to the Brink of War. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014.

Evans, Eli N. Judah P. Benjamin, the Jewish Confederate. New York: Free Press, 1989.

Korn, Bertram W. “JUDAH P. BENJAMIN AS A JEW.” Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society, vol. 38, no. 3, 1949, pp. 153–171. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/43059749.

MacMillan, Catharine. “Judah Benjamin: marginalized outsider or admitted insider?” Journal of Law and Society, 42 (1), 2015, pp. 150–172. doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.14676478.2015.00702.

Nadell, Pamela S. and Jonathan D. Sarna, eds. Women and American Judaism: Historical Perspectives. Hanover N.H.: University Press of New England, 2001.

Singer, Jane. The Confederate Dirty War: Arson, Bombings, Assassination, and Plots for Chemical and Germ Attacks on the Union. Jefferson, N.C: McFarland & Co, 2005.

Stone, Kurt F. The Jews of Capitol Hill: A Compendium of Jewish Congressional Members. Lanham, Md: Scarecrow Press, Inc, 2011.

Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS is a journalist, librarian, and historian. She has a BA in History & Art History, and an MLIS, Masters in Library and Information Studies both from McGill University. She has done graduate work in Jewish history at Concordia University as part of the MA in Judaic Studies program. She is currently expanding her article about Confederate cabinet secretary Judah Benjamin “The Mysterious Prince of the Confederacy: Judah P. Benjamin and the Jewish goal of whiteness in the South” into a full-length biography.

[1] https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/11/opinion/bernie-sanders-election.html

[2] https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/01/13/opinion/bernie-sanders-nytimes-interview.html

[3] https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2020/01/bloomberg-and-sanders-embrace-judaism-not-each-other/605503/

[4] Evans, Judah P. Benjamin, 149.

[5] Ibid., Evans, Judah P. Benjamin, xiii.

[6] https://jewishcurrents.org/how-to-fight-antisemitism/

[7] https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2020/01/bloomberg-and-sanders-embrace-judaism-not-each-other/605503/

[8] https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/elections/presidential/caucus/2019/12/29/bernie-sanders-celebrates-hanukkah-des-moines-menorah-lighting/2772165001/

[9] https://www.jta.org/quick-reads/bernie-sanders-rolls-out-his-jewish-bernie-campaign-video

[10] https://www.jta.org/quick-reads/bernie-sanders-rolls-out-his-jewish-bernie-campaign-video

[11] https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2020/01/bloomberg-and-sanders-embrace-judaism-not-each-other/605503/

[12] https://www.jta.org/quick-reads/bernie-sanders-being-jewish-is-one-of-two-factors-that-shaped-his-outlook

[13] https://twitter.com/berniesanders/status/1170120494017740801?lang=en

[14] https://www.jta.org/2020/02/13/politics/cornel-west-uses-hebrew-word-chesed-at-bernie-sanders-rally

[15] https://jewishjournal.com/rosnersdomain/310299/bernie-sanders-and-the-jews/

[16] https://jewishcurrents.org/how-to-fight-antisemitism/

[17] https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2020/01/bloomberg-and-sanders-embrace-judaism-not-each-other/605503/

[18] https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/01/31/among-democrats-christians-lean-toward-biden-while-nones-prefer-sanders/

[19] https://jewishjournal.com/rosnersdomain/310299/bernie-sanders-and-the-jews/

[20] https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/01/13/opinion/bernie-sanders-nytimes-interview.html

[21] Arthur T. Downey, The Creole Affair: The Slave Rebellion That Led the U.S. and Great Britain to the Brink of War, (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), 160.

[22] Bertram W. Korn, “JUDAH P. BENJAMIN AS A JEW.” Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society, vol. 38, no. 3, 1949, 168. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/43059749.

[23] Eli N. Evans, Judah P. Benjamin: The Jewish Confederate, (New York: Free Press, 1988), 97.

[24] Evans, Judah P. Benjamin, 10.

[25] Evans, Judah P. Benjamin, 11.

[26] Korn, “JUDAH P. BENJAMIN AS A JEW”

[27] Evans, Judah P. Benjamin, xvii.

[28] Catharine MacMillan, “Judah Benjamin: marginalized outsider or admitted insider?” Journal of Law and Society, 42 (1), 2015, 2. doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.14676478.2015.00702

[29] Whitaker, Sketches of Life and Character in Louisiana, 28.

[30] MacMillan, “Judah Benjamin: marginalized outsider or admitted insider?,” 11.

[31] Korn, “JUDAH P. BENJAMIN AS A JEW.” 156.

[32] Ibid., Korn, “JUDAH P. BENJAMIN AS A JEW.” 157.

[33] Pamela S. Nadell and Jonathan D. Sarna, eds. Women and American Judaism: Historical Perspectives, (Hanover N.H.: University Press of New England, 2001), 84.

[34] Korn, “JUDAH P. BENJAMIN AS A JEW.” 167.

[35] Stone, The Jews of Capitol Hill, 41.

[36] MacMillan, “Judah Benjamin: marginalized outsider or admitted insider?,” 18–19.

[37] Ibid., MacMillan, “Judah Benjamin: marginalized outsider or admitted insider?,” 18–19.

[38] Evans, Judah P. Benjamin, 121.

Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS is a journalist, librarian, and historian. She has a BA in History & Art History, and an MLIS, Masters in Library and Information Studies both from McGill University. She has done graduate work in Jewish history at Concordia University as part of the MA in Judaic Studies program. She is currently expanding her article about Confederate cabinet secretary Judah Benjamin “The Mysterious Prince of the Confederacy: Judah P. Benjamin and the Jewish Goal of Whiteness in the South” into a full-length biography.

Politics July 26, 2016: Clinton makes history becomes the first woman nominated for president garners Dem nom

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Clinton makes history becomes the first woman nominated for president garners Dem nom

By Bonnie K. Goodman

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26:  Delegates cheer as a screen displays Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivering remarks to the crowd during the evening session on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

PHILADELPHIA, PA – JULY 26: Delegates cheer as a screen displays Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivering remarks to the crowd during the evening session on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party’s nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Hillary Clinton has finally broken the glass ceiling and made history. On Tuesday, July 26, 2016, Clinton was formally nominated as the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee during the roll call vote on the second day of the convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Former opponent Bernie Sanders proclaimed Clinton the nominee, while many of his supporters walked in protest. Clinton later addressed the convention by video from New York accepting the nomination.

During the roll vote on Tuesday, Clinton was formally nominated after South Dakota announced their delegate count. Then, Clinton, had enough delegates put her over the top of the necessary 2,383 delegates needed to secure the nomination.

Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) formally nominated Clinton. As the first and longest-serving woman in the Senate, Mikulski noted the historic moment, saying, “It is with a full heart that I am here today as we nominate Hillary Clinton to be the first woman president. She wants to break barriers so you won’t have barriers. You can count on her. She’ll fight for your day-to-day needs and the long range needs of the country.”

Civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) seconded the nomination. Rep. Lewis said, “We have come too far, we’ve made too much progress and we are not going back, we are going forward. Eight years ago our party, the Democratic Party nominated and elected the first person of color to serve in the White House. Tonight, on this night, we will shatter that glass ceiling again.”

The roll call was state-by-state with Vermont the last to cast their votes to honor Sanders whose endorsement of Clinton, speech on Monday evening, and efforts during the roll call were aimed at unifying the Democratic Party after a divisive primary.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) nominated Sanders’ praising the Vermont Senator, “My friends, because this is a movement fueled by love it can never be stopped or defeated. Now on the behalf of millions inspired by aloha, determined to seek a future rooted in love, compassion and justice for all and dedicated to a government of the people by the people and for the people. I’m honored to nominate Bernie Sanders for president of the United States.”

Before Clinton was officially declared the nominee, the party carefully orchestrated a tribute to Sanders. The Vermont Senator’s older brother Larry, who lives in Oxford, England, announced the delegate tally for Democrats Abroad. Larry Sanders gave an emotional tribute to their parents and his brother’s revolution.

Sanders expressed, “I want to bring before the convention the names of our parents, Eli Sanders and Dorothy Glassberg Sanders. They did not have easy lives, and they died young. They would be immensely proud of their son and his accomplishments. They loved him. They loved the New Deal of Roosevelt and would be especially proud that Bernard is renewing that vision. It is with enormous pride that I cast my vote for Bernie Sanders.”

Afterward, the Vermont Senator formally proclaimed, “I move that Hillary Clinton be selected as the nominee of the Democratic Party for President of the United States.” Sanders’ proclamation angered his supporters many of whom walked out of the convention hall chanting, “This is what democracy looks like.”

In the evening, Clinton spoke via video to the Convention, accepting the nomination. The video commenced with images of all 44 male presidents before coming to breaking glass, for the glass ceiling Clinton broke with her history-making nomination. After, Clinton told her supporters, “What an incredible honor that you have given me, and I can’t believe we just put the biggest crack in that glass ceiling yet. This is really your victory. This is really your night. And if there are any little girls out there who stayed up late to watch, let me just say I may become the first woman President. But one of you is next.”

Politics July 24, 2016: Wasserman Schultz resigning as DNC chair after emails leaked opposing Sanders

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Wasserman Schultz resigning as DNC chair after emails leaked opposing Sanders

By Bonnie K. Goodman

579535834
After a scandal that showed that the Democratic National Committee favored presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton over Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz will resign. Wasserman Schultz announced her resignation on Sunday afternoon, July 24, 2016, after a three-day drama over emails, which saw her position within the party shrink before she was forced out of her role as chair. Wasserman Schultz resignation will be effective after the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia concludes on July 28.

In her statement announcing her resignation, Wasserman Schultz said, “Going forward, the best way for me to accomplish those goals is to step down as Party Chair at the end of this convention. As Party Chair, this week I will open and close the Convention and I will address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats but all Americans.”

On Friday, July 22, Wikileaks released nearly 20,000 emails from DNC staff members. The emails detailed the DNC’s plans to undermine Sanders’ campaign during the primary season for Clinton. During the primaries, a party is supposed to remain impartial regarding their candidates running for a nomination.

The emails from the DNC chair were the most damning. According to the Hill, Wasserman Schultz wrote in May that Sanders “isn’t going to be president” and in April that he “has no understanding of” the Democratic Party. Wasserman Schultz also planned to use Sanders’ religion to undermine him with voters in the South, although they both are Jewish.

The emails showed Wasserman Schultz as defiant and arrogant and completely against Sanders’ campaign. According to Politico, the DNC chair called “Sanders campaign manager Jeff Weaver a ‘damn liar’ and an ‘ASS’ and said the senator has ‘never been a member of the Democratic Party and has no understanding of what we do.'” There was enough evidence to show that the DNC was biased against Sanders’ from the start of his campaign, for Clinton.

At first, the party just wanted to limit Wasserman Schultz’s involvement in the Democratic Convention. On Saturday, party officials stripped her of actively being the chair and removing her as a speaker to avoid protests from Sanders’ supporters. Then the “DNC Rules Committee named Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio as the permanent chair of the convention.” Fudge will now be responsible for gaveling each day in order and closed. However, Wasserman Schultz and her allies insisted, and now she will have a limited role, and she will address the convention, but afterward will resign her post.

Sanders called for the DNC chair’s resignation for a long time during his campaign claiming bias against him. After the emails released proved the longtime suspicion, Sanders again called for  Wasserman Schultz’s resignation on Sunday morning. Sanders told Jack Tapper on CNN’s State of the Union, “I don’t think she is qualified to be the chair of the DNC, not only for these awful emails, which revealed the prejudice of the DNC, but also because we need a party that reaches out to working people and young people, and I don’t think her leadership style is doing that.”

Continuing, Sanders said, “Aside from all of that, it is an outrage and sad that you would have people in important positions in the DNC trying to undermine my campaign. It goes without saying: The function of the DNC is to represent all of the candidates — to be fair and even-minded.” On ABC’s “This Week” Sanders said, “I think she should resign, period. And I think we need a new chair who is going to lead us in a very different direction….I’m disappointed, and that’s the way it is.”

Sanders received support in his call for the DNC’s resignation from Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid, who wanted Wasserman Schultz to resign even before the emails were leaked. Neither did House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi come to her colleague’s defense. Additionally many party leaders wanted her removed after the embarrassing and damaging emails.

After the DNC chair had announced her resignation, Sanders issued a statement, saying, “Debbie Wasserman Schultz has made the right decision for the future of the Democratic Party. While she deserves thanks for her years of service, the party now needs new leadership that will open the doors of the party and welcome in working people and young people. The party leadership must also always remain impartial in the presidential nominating process, something which did not occur in the 2016 race.” Sanders is set to address the Democratic convention on Monday evening.

After the resignation, both President Barack Obama and Clinton praised Wasserman Schultz in statements. President Obama said, “For the last eight years, Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz has had my back. This afternoon, I called her to let her know that I am grateful.” As well, presumptive nominee Clinton issued a statement, “I am grateful to Debbie for getting the Democratic Party to this year’s historic convention in Philadelphia, and I know that this week’s events will be a success thanks to her hard work and leadership. There’s simply no one better at taking the fight to the Republicans than Debbie.”

GOP nominee Donald Trump has long said the Democratic Party, has been mistreating Sanders. Trump also remarked about Wasserman Schultz’s resignation via Twitter, “Today proves what I have always known, that @Reince Priebus is the tough one and the smart one, not Debbie Wasserman Shultz (@DWStweets.)” Trump tweeted a second time, saying, “Crooked Hillary Clinton was not at all loyal to the person in her rigged system that pushed her over the top, DWS. Too bad Bernie flamed out.”

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus also commented, “I think the day’s events show really the uphill climb Democrats face this week.” Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort also issued a statement, saying, “Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned over her failure to secure the DNC’s email servers and the rigged system she set up with the Clinton campaign. Now Hillary Clinton should follow Wasserman Schultz’s lead and drop out over her failure to safeguard top secret, classified information both on her unauthorized home server and while traveling abroad.”

DNC Vice Chair Donna Brazile will be the interim chair of the party throughout the election. The DNC will vote this week on Brazile taking over, although she has already temporarily filled that role in 2011. There is speculation that Clinton wants Housing Secretary Julian Castro to succeed Wasserman Schultz as DNC chair.

The party’s primary concern now is party unity. The emails complicate the already the delicate agreement between the Sanders and Clinton campaigns. Democrats are concerned about Sanders’ supporters rebelling at the convention; one Democrat called the situation, “gas meets flame,” all of which might backfire and hand the election to the Republicans and Trump.

Politics July 12, 2016: Sanders endorses Clinton vows to help beat Trump

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Sanders endorses Clinton vows to help beat Trump

By Bonnie K. Goodman

PORTSMOUTH, NH -  Democratic Presumptive Nominee for President former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attends a rally with Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) at Portsmouth High School Gymnasium in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Tuesday, July 12, 2016. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

PORTSMOUTH, NH – Democratic Presumptive Nominee for President former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attends a rally with Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) at Portsmouth High School Gymnasium in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Tuesday, July 12, 2016. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Vermont Senator and Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders has finally endorsed rival and presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. Sanders endorsed Clinton at a joint rally at Portsmouth High School, New Hampshire. To gain the endorsement, Clinton relented to many of Sanders’s progressive requests for the Democratic Party’s platform, including health care, college tuition, climate change and raising the minimum wage.

Speaking at the rally surrounded by banners reading, “Stronger Together,” Sanders announced he is endorsing Clinton. The Vermont Senator declared, Clinton “will be the Democratic nominee for president and I intend to do everything I can to make certain she will be the next president of the United States. I have come here to make it as clear as possible as to why I am endorsing Hillary Clinton and why she must become our next president.”

Continuing, Sanders explained why he is supporting Clinton after the divisive primary season. Sanders said, “I have come here today not to talk about the past but to focus on the future. That future will be shaped more by what happens on November 8 in voting booths across our nation than by any other event in the world. I have come here to make it as clear as possible as to why I am endorsing Hillary Clinton and why she must become our next president.”
Sanders took aim at presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump. Sanders pointed out, “This campaign is changing soon. Trump is expected to announce his running mate any day now, and the GOP platform is taking shape. This is the last week we can pull together and show how unified we are before Trump and the Republicans come after us – and the values we hold dear – in Cleveland.”

Clinton in turn also gave some remarks. The presumptive nominee said, “I cannot help but reflect how much more enjoyable this election is going to be now that we are on the same side.” Clinton vowed to beat Trump, “We are joining forces to defeat Donald Trump, win in November and, yes, together, build a future we can all believe in.”

Clinton also praised Sanders and the way he created a movement, saying he “brought people off the sidelines and into the political process.” Clinton said Sanders “has energized and inspired a generation of young people who care deeply about our country and are building a movement that is bigger than one candidate or one campaign.” Clinton also expressed, “Thank you for your endorsement, but more than that, thank you for your lifetime of fighting injustice.”

At the same time as the rally, Clinton’s campaign sent out a fundraising email. The email read,  “Today, I am so honored that Senator Sanders is joining me on the campaign trail and is ready to take on Trump and the GOP,” Clinton also asked the Vermont Senator’s supporters to “stand with Senator Sanders and me.”

Trump’s campaign criticized Sanders’ decision to endorse Clinton. Trump’s senior policy adviser Stephen Miller commented, “Bernie’s endorsement becomes Exhibit A in our rigged system – the Democrat Party is disenfranchising its voters to benefit the select and privileged few.”

Sanders appearance with Clinton ends the primary campaign and unifies the party’s leadership. Although it remains to be seen whether Sanders’ supporters will follow their candidate and support Clinton. Many Sanders supporters appeared at the rally shooting “Bernie” while others shouted “unity.” When Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) spoke introducing Sanders and Clinton, some in the crowds chanted “no.” Both Clinton and Sanders’s campaign are still negotiating further joint events and campaigning.

Politics June 24, 2016: Sanders will vote for Clinton but not ready for an endorsement

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders will vote for Clinton but not ready for an endorsement

By Bonnie K. Goodman
June 24, 2016 6:47 PM MST
Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders will vote to presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, but does not plan to endorse her until she meets three of his demands that include certain issues in the party platform, June 24, 2016
Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders will vote to presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, but does not plan to endorse her until she meets three of his demands that include certain issues in the party platform, June 24, 2016
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Politics June 8, 2016: Democrats still divided between Sanders and Clinton on last major primary day

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Democrats still divided between Sanders and Clinton on last major primary day

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 8, 2016 1:30 AM MST
On Tuesday Night, Hillary Clinton cemented her status as the party nominee. It was a historic moment, Clinton becoming toe first woman to win the nomination of a major party for President of the United States. But as Clinton made history, Sanders...

Play
On Tuesday Night, Hillary Clinton cemented her status as the party nominee. It was a historic moment, Clinton becoming toe first woman to win the nomination of a major party for President of the United States. But as Clinton made history, Sanders…
on.aol.com

Politics June 5, 2016: Sanders promises contested Democratic convention against Clinton

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders promises contested Democratic convention against Clinton

Politics June 1, 2016: Sanders and Clinton in dead heat week before California primary

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders and Clinton in dead heat week before California primary

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 1, 2016 11:54 PM MST
  Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton are virtually tied in the race for California, the biggest prize of the Democratic primary season, June 1, 2016
Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton are virtually tied in the race for California, the biggest prize of the Democratic primary season, June 1, 2016
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Politics May 28, 2016: Trump now refuses to debate Sanders calling him a second place finisher

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Trump now refuses to debate Sanders calling him a second place finisher

May 28, 2016, 9:01 AM MST

GOP nominee Donald Trump is refusing to debate Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders ahead of the California primary, May 27, 2016
GOP nominee Donald Trump is refusing to debate Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders ahead of the California primary, May 27, 2016
Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

Politics May 21, 2016: Clinton might be open to taking Sanders as her VP running mate

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Clinton might be open to taking Sanders as her VP running mate

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 21, 2016, 7:18 PM MST

 Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton is certain she will be the nominee, but might consider taking rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders as her running mate in an attempt to unite the party, May 19, 2016
Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton is certain she will be the nominee, but might consider taking rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders as her running mate in an attempt to unite the party, May 19, 2016
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Politics May 18, 2016: Sanders wins Oregon, Clinton barely wins Kentucky as divisions plague Democrats

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders wins Oregon, Clinton barely wins Kentucky as divisions plague Democrats

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 18, 2016 6:51 PM MST

Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton had a bittersweet victory with the Kentucky primary; she was virtually tied with rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, later Sanders decisively won Oregon's primary, May 17, 2016
Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton had a bittersweet victory with the Kentucky primary; she was virtually tied with rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, later Sanders decisively won Oregon’s primary, May 17, 2016
Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

Politics May 11, 2016: Sanders beats Clinton wins big in West Virginia vows to win the nomination

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders beats Clinton wins big in West Virginia vows to win the nomination

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 11, 2016 4:18 AM MST

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders beat rival, Hillary Clinton, again this time in West Virginia proving the Democratic primary race is still alive and well, May 10, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders beat rival, Hillary Clinton, again this time in West Virginia proving the Democratic primary race is still alive and well, May 10, 2016
Robb Kerr/Getty Images

Politics May 4, 2016: Sanders upsets Clinton wins Indiana primary vows to beat Trump in election

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders upsets Clinton wins Indiana primary vows to beat Trump in election

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 4, 2016 12:08 AM MST

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders wins Indiana primary in upset victory over opponent and front-runner Hillary Clinton; Sanders believes he is the best candidate to up against presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump, May 3, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders wins Indiana primary in upset victory over opponent and front-runner Hillary Clinton; Sanders believes he is the best candidate to up against presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump, May 3, 2016
Photo by John Sommers II/Getty Images

Politics May 2, 2016: Sanders fights to win nomination promises Clinton battle in contested convention

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders fights to win nomination promises Clinton battle in contested convention

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 2, 2016 9:14 AM MST

 Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is promising to take the battle for the Democratic nomination with Hillary Clinton all the way to a contested convention, May 1, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is promising to take the battle for the Democratic nomination with Hillary Clinton all the way to a contested convention, May 1, 2016
Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Politics April 27, 2016: Clinton wins four Atlantic primaries Sanders wins one changes campaign goals

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Clinton wins four Atlantic primaries Sanders wins one changes campaign goals

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 27, 2016 7:43 AM MST

Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton won four of the Atlantic primaries while Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won one; Clinton hopes to unify the party while Sanders wants Clinton to adopt his issues in the party's platform, April 26, 2016
Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton won four of the Atlantic primaries while Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won one; Clinton hopes to unify the party while Sanders wants Clinton to adopt his issues in the party’s platform, April 26, 2016
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Politics April 20, 2016: Did Clinton really win the NY primary since Sanders won most of the counties?

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Did Clinton really win the NY primary since Sanders won most of the counties?

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 20, 2016 11:28 AM MST

Hillary Clinton was declared the winner of New York primary, but she only won 12 out of the 62 counties, while Bernie Sanders took a majority, 50 counties in all, April 19, 2016
Hillary Clinton was declared the winner of New York primary, but she only won 12 out of the 62 counties, while Bernie Sanders took a majority, 50 counties in all, April 19, 2016
Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Politics April 20, 2016: Clinton wins big in New York primary Sanders vows to fight to the convention

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Clinton wins big in New York primary Sanders vows to fight to the convention

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 20, 2016 4:16 AM MST

Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton won the New York primary by a wide margin over her rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders cementing his front-runner status, April 19, 2016
Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton won the New York primary by a wide margin over her rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders cementing his front-runner status, April 19, 2016
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Politics April 19, 2016: Sanders and Clinton virtually tied ahead of New York primary

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders and Clinton virtually tied ahead of New York primary

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 19, 2016 2:38 AM MST

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is virtually tied with front-runner Hillary Clinton in the most recent national poll, the problem Sanders still trails in the double digits a day before the April 19 New York primary, April 18, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is virtually tied with front-runner Hillary Clinton in the most recent national poll, the problem Sanders still trails in the double digits a day before the April 19 New York primary, April 18, 2016
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Politics April 16, 2016: Bernie Sanders goes to the Vatican meets Pope Francis

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Bernie Sanders goes to the Vatican meets Pope Francis

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 16, 2016 4:55 PM MST

Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders had a brief meeting with Pope Francis on Saturday morning, after addressing the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences on wealth inequality on Friday, April 16, 2016
Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders had a brief meeting with Pope Francis on Saturday morning, after addressing the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences on wealth inequality on Friday, April 16, 2016
Photo by Elisabetta Villa/Getty Images

Politics April 16, 2016: Sanders would beat likely GOP nominee Trump in a general election

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders would beat likely GOP nominee Trump in a general election

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 16, 2016 4:54 PM MST

Democratic candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is the strongest and most liked candidate running this election cycle according to a new CBS News poll, April 15, 2016
Democratic candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is the strongest and most liked candidate running this election cycle according to a new CBS News poll, April 15, 2016
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Politics April 9, 2016: Sanders wins Wyoming caucuses continues winning streak over Clinton

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders wins Wyoming caucuses continues winning streak over Clinton 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 9, 2016 5:26 PM MST

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won Wyoming's Democratic caucuses his eighth win in nine nominating contests, proving his momentum against Clinton has staying power as they go into the New York primary, April 9, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won Wyoming’s Democratic caucuses his eighth win in nine nominating contests, proving his momentum against Clinton has staying power as they go into the New York primary, April 9, 2016
Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images

 

Politics April 9, 2016: New poll if Trump is not nominee GOP certain to lose election to Democrats

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

New poll if Trump is not nominee GOP certain to lose election to Democrats

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 9, 2016 12:32 PM MST

 If the Republican Party prevents frontrunner Donald Trump from the nomination, they could be facing a revolt from his supporters, April 9, 2016
If the Republican Party prevents frontrunner Donald Trump from the nomination, they could be facing a revolt from his supporters, April 9, 2016
Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

Politics April 7, 2016: New frontrunner? Sanders leads Clinton nationally as campaign gains momentum

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

New frontrunner? Sanders leads Clinton nationally as campaign gains momentum

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 7, 2016 4:04 AM MST

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders now leads Hillary Clinton nationally according to a new poll that suggests deep divisions within the Democratic Party, April 5, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders now leads Hillary Clinton nationally according to a new poll that suggests deep divisions within the Democratic Party, April 5, 2016
Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Politics April 6, 2016: Sanders wins Wisconsin primary by wide margin claims momentum against Clinton

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Sanders wins Wisconsin primary by wide margin claims momentum against Clinton

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 6, 2016 9:20 AM MST

 Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won big in Wisconsin's Democratic primary and is now claiming momentum moving on to New York's delegate-rich primary in two weeks, April 5, 2016
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won big in Wisconsin’s Democratic primary and is now claiming momentum moving on to New York’s delegate-rich primary in two weeks, April 5, 2016
Photo by Theo Stroomer/Getty Images

Politics April 4, 2016: Clinton and Sanders finally set a date to debate in New York on April 14

EXAMINER ARTICLES

Examiner_Articles

POLITICS

Clinton and Sanders finally set a date to debate in New York on April 14

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 4, 2016 11:01 PM MST

Democratic candidates former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders have agreed to debate on April 14 in Brooklyn, New York after nearly two months of negotiations, April 4, 2016
Democratic candidates former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders have agreed to debate on April 14 in Brooklyn, New York after nearly two months of negotiations, April 4, 2016
Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images