Politics May 10, 2018: GOP closing in on Democrats in new 2018 Midterm elections poll with Trump the main issue

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GOP closing in on Democrats in new 2018 Midterm elections poll with Trump the main issue

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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In less than six months before the 2018 midterm elections, the Democrats are losing their poll advantage against the Republicans. In less than four months they lost a significant advantage, that indicates that the election could still go either way. On Wednesday, May 9, 2018, CNN / SSRS released a new poll on the midterm elections, that indicated 47 percent of “registered voters” supported their local Democratic candidate versus 44 percent saying they support the Republican candidate. In February, Democrats had a huge 16 point lead, that shrunk in March to six percent and now is three percent, within a poll’s margin of error. President Donald Trump’s approval rating is partially the cause as Democrats have yet to focuses on an issue to rally voters aside from their opposition to the president.

According to the latest poll, American voters still do not know if the GOP should retain control on Congress; the House of Representatives and Senate. Democrats only have a slight edge when it comes over who “the country would be better off” with 31percent versus 30 percent saying the GOP. While 34 percent saying it does not matter who controls Congress, with nearly half of independent voters 48 percent among them.

Still, more Democrats are very enthusiastic about the election versus Republicans, 50 to 44 percent; Republicans have boosted their enthusiasm factor up from 36 percent in March. As CNN notes, “53% of those who are very enthusiastic about voting say they’d back the Democrat in their district vs. 41% who say they favor the GOP candidate.” Ten percent more of enthusiastic voters want that Democrats to control Congress. Enthusiasm is always an important factor in elections as it brings voters to the polls, the extra incentive is necessary especially in midterm elections.

This year’s midterms are definitely a referendum on President Trump, with 64 percent claiming Trump is a very or extremely important factor in their voting this fall, while among enthusiastic voters that numbers jump to 78 percent. Enthusiastic voters are the ones that oppose the president the most with 51 percent wanting a candidate who opposes his policies, versus 46 percent, who want a candidate that agrees with him. Still, those numbers are down from January, 52 percent of voters would support a candidate who opposes Trump versus 41 who support him, the numbers are now 48 to 43 percent.

Helping the Republicans is that Trump’s poll numbers among all Americans are actually holding “steady” at 41 percent approving and 53 disapproving the same as in the last poll in March. The president’s numbers are far better among voters, with a 44 percent approval rating and a 51 percent disapproval rating. However, he is gaining points in his handling of the issues. Meanwhile, six in ten Americans find the country is going in the right direction, 57 percent up eight points from March. More Democrats find the country is going in a good direction, 40 percent up from 25 in February.

Trump’s numbers are improving because of increased Democratic support, especially on the issues. The economy is the issue where Trump has the best approval rating, at 52 percent up from 48 percent. Eleven percent more Democrats approve of the president’s handling of the economy now with 26 percent. Trump’s number is also improving on foreign trade 43 percent up from 38, and immigration 40 percent up from 36. His approval rating has also improved on foreign affairs to 42 percent up from 39 percent. Some of these numbers are the best since his first 100 days in office.

Trump’s best issue in the polls, the economy seems to be the most important issue to voters with 84 percent calling it extremely or very important, that number has grown from February, where 79 percent felt that way. Taxes is a rising issue with 73 percent saying is important, up from 67 percent. Immigration also remains hot-button issue, 76 percent up from 72 percent of voters calling it important. Gun control remains an important issue, 76 percent of all voters consider it important, only down two points from February, when there was a mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. The 15 point divide between the two parties has virtually faded with 79 of Democrats and 76 percent of Republicans calling it an important issue. The rest of the issues have declined in importance; health care down 80 from 83 percent, sexual harassment 58 down from 64 percent, and even the Russia investigation are losing importance 40 down from 45 percent. The changes in importance on issues is mostly partisan based.

The Congressional party leaders in the House on both sides fare worse in their popularity than the president. Only 30 percent view Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi favorably versus 49 percent unfavorable, with only 57 percent of Democrats having a positive view of their leader. Outgoing Speaker of the House Paul Ryan fares better with 38 percent viewing him favorably versus 46 percent unfavorably. Ryan numbers are better mostly from greater GOP support, with 67 percent of the party having a positive view of the speaker. Despite voters feeling about their leaders, the Democratic Party is viewed more favorably, 44 percent to the GOP’s 39 percent.

While voters usually want candidates that share their views, Democrats care about less about this than Republicans, 76 to 67 percent. Democrats have been facing problems trying to decide which issue they should focus on in the midterm campaign. Most, however, agree an anti-Trump campaign will not be enough. Princeton University historian and CNN political analyst Julian Zelizer told The Hill, believes that vagueness on the issues helps the party, “Politically, their preference is to have some agenda items and some broad ideas that the party will fight for, and enough vagueness that it’s hard to be pinned down. It’s literally a document to rally people, and I think the good ones are written that way.”

Writing in an editorial on CNN, entitled “Democrats, focus on midterms — not Trump impeachment talk,” Zelizer cautions “The biggest challenge for Democrats is to avoid letting anti-Trump fervor drown out their own message.” Democrats need 23 seats to gain control of the House and at least a seven-point poll advantage over the GOP, which they lost in this latest poll. Trump’s improved polls numbers are a hamper to any anti-message against him, get is now also no longer the most unpopular president, his poll numbers are similar to Democratic President Jimmy Carter in May 1978, still, not the most promising comparison to the one-term president. With Trump’s numbers in a “Goldilocks zone,” where he can neither harm nor help his party, and Republicans will have it easier as a result to retain power, while Democrats will have to work harder for control of Congress.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

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Politics January 8, 2017: 115th Congress convenes, Ryan reelected speaker and Senate sworn-in

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115th Congress convenes, Ryan reelected speaker and Senate sworn-in

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Congress met on Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017, for the 115th session and the first of Donald Trump’s administration with their leaders voted back. The ceremonial duties of the first day in the House and Senate went off smoothly with Paul Ryan (R-WI) being reelected Speaker of the House of Representatives and Nancy Pelosi (D- CA) as the Democratic Minority Leader. Meanwhile, in the Senate, Vice President Joe Biden swore-in his last group of Senators including newly elected freshmen as well as 27 other Senators who won reelection in November.

In the House, the new Congress was swore-in, and they formally voted in their leaders. Ryan retained his speakership as expected with an almost unanimous vote the Republican caucus. Ryan received 239 votes with only Republican objector, Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.)
W ho decided to vote for Ryan opponent for the speakership in 2015 Rep. Daniel Webster (R-Fla.). Ryan now embarks on his first full term as speaker presiding over a majority of 241 Republicans, while Pelosi’s Democrats gained six seats with 194 members.

Pelosi retained her minority leader post with 189 votes with only four Democrats defecting. Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.) and Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-New York) cast their votes for Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) who challenged Pelosi this past fall. Rep. Ron Kind (D-Wisc.) voted for Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.), while Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) chose Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.).

In the Senate, Vice President Biden presided over the swearing-in ceremonies of freshmen and those re-elected in November for the last time. Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) greeted the 115th Congress and their families that attended the ceremony. McConnell expressed, “I’m pleased to welcome back familiar faces and express warm greetings to new members.” McConnell let the Senators know there is “hard work” to be done this term, but now they should “take a moment to celebrate the rich tradition of this day.”

The Senate chamber was filled with both the newcomers and past Senators including those that are just retiring. Past Sens. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) and Richard Lugar (R-Ind.) joined the festivities while former Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Former Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) also attended the ceremony. With this 115th session, Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) becomes the “longest serving female senator.”

Biden swore-in the freshmen senators in a separate ceremony in the Old Senate Chamber on Tuesday afternoon. Among the freshmen, two new Republicans, “Todd Young (R-Ind.) and John Kennedy (R-La.),” and five new Democrats “Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.), Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) and Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.).”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Politics January 10, 2017: Senate begins confirmation hearings for Trump cabinet nominees

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Senate begins confirmation hearings for Trump cabinet nominees

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

With just ten days to go until Donald Trump takes the oath of office becoming the President of the United States, the Senate is beginning confirmation hearings for Trump’s cabinet nominees. So far, the Senate scheduled confirmation hearings for eight of the cabinet’s most important positions and began the process on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017 on Capitol Hill. Democrats are promising to give Trump’s nominees a difficult time in the hot seat, many of the president-elect’s nominees have not submitted financial documents to Office of Governmental Ethics their review; Trump’s cabinet is expected to have the greatest net worth of any previous presidential cabinet. None of the nominees can be confirmed until Trump takes office.

As ABC News notes all cabinet level position, leading a government agency need to be confirmed by the Senate. They include the following posts: “the secretaries of agriculture, commerce, defense, education, energy, health and human services, homeland security, housing and urban development, interior, labor, state, transportation, treasury, and veterans affairs, as well as the attorney general, director of the Office of Management and Budget, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. trade representative, ambassador to the United Nations, chair of the Council of Economic Advisers and administrator of the Small Business Administration.”

In total 1,212 “senior posts and agency heads” need to be confirmed by the Senate after a “background check” is complete. A lengthy indeed, so much so that the trump transition is downplaying the need for background checks in an attempt to move along the confirmation process in the Republican-controlled Senate. Only advisors to the president and the White House chief of staff are exempt from the arduous process.

ABC News explained the confirmation process; nominees go through extreme vetting by the president’s team and the FBI submitting “financial disclosure reports, criminal checks and questionnaires about ties to foreign governments.” Then the appropriate Senate committee conducts the hearing for the nominee then they vote to determine if the entire Senate will vote to confirm the nominee if so it goes to the Senate floor. Since the Democrats opted for the nuclear option, confirmations only require a “simple majority” vote of 51 senators, and they can no longer be filibustered or require 60 votes.

The following is the schedule for the Senate confirmation hearings:

Attorney General: Jeff Sessions — Jan. 10–11, 9:30 a.m.
Homeland Security: John Kelly — Jan. 10, 3:30 p.m.
Secretary of State: Rex Tillerson — Jan. 11–12, 9 a.m., 10 a.m.
CIA Director: Mike Pompeo — Jan. 11, 10 a.m.
Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao — Jan. 11, 10:15 a.m.
Secretary of Commerce: Wilbur Ross — Jan. 12, 10 a.m.
Secretary of Housing: Ben Carson, Jan. 12, 10 a.m.
Secretary of Education: Betsy DeVos — Jan. 17, 5 p.m.
Secretary of Labor: Andy Puzder — Jan. 17 (tentative)
U.N. Ambassador: Nikki Haley — Jan. 18 (tentative)

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

 

Politics January 10, 2017: 2016 election is over as Congress certifies Trump’s Electoral College win

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2016 election is over as Congress certifies Trump’s Electoral College win

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Finally, what seemed like the longest and nastiest presidential election in American history is over. On Friday, January 6, 2017, Congress in a joint session certified the Electoral College votes the elected Republican Donald Trump president. Like the campaign, the certification process did not complete without Democrats trying to mount a last minute effort to prevent Trump from becoming president, actions, that Vice President Joe Biden, who presided over the count shutdown.

In a process that took an hour, Trump was certified with 304 Electoral Votes rather than 306 with two Texas faithless electors voted for Ohio Gov. John Kasich and the other for former Sen. Ron Paul. Democrat Hillary Clinton ended up with 227 Electoral votes as opposed to the 232 she was supposed to receive after the election returns were counted surprisingly five electors defected from Clinton. According to ABC News Online the “FINAL CERTIFIED TALLY: Donald Trump — 304, Hillary Clinton — 227, Colin Powell — 3, John Kasich — 1, Ron Paul — 1, Bernie Sanders — 1, Faith Spotted Eagle — 1.”

The certification did not go off smoothly as some Democratic representatives from “various states” protested during the process, but they needed a Democratic senator to join their cause in writing, and none wanted to make a “formal complaint.” According to The Hill, the representatives that objected to the Electoral Votes include “Freshman Democratic Reps. Jamie Raskin (Md.) and Pramila Jayapal (Wash.)” and “Reps. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas) and Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.).”

Instead, the representatives just interrupted and annoyed Biden who had to chastise them repeatedly, and according to CNN, they interrupted the Vice President 11 times. Biden scolded them a few times, “There is no debate. There is no debate.” Biden told Rep. Jayapal, “There is no debate, and if it’s not signed by a senator the objection cannot be entertained.”ABC News recounted that he banged the gavel several times to stop one representative from speaking.

The Vice President also gave them a reality check telling the representatives “It is over.” According to the Hill, Biden’s declaration prompted “cheers” from the Republicans who mostly occupied the chamber and even made Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.) “laugh.” Thankfully, it is all over after the rollercoaster ride that was the 2016 presidential election.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

 

Politics January 10, 2017: Republicans face in backlash on the first day of 115th Congress

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Republicans face in backlash on the first day of 115th Congress

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Congress convened on Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017, for the 115th session and the first of Donald Trump’s administration in a rocky start. Even before the session officially started it began with controversy for the Republican majority in the House of Representatives who went against Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and voted on Tuesday, Jan. 2 to “weaken” the independent Office of Congressional Ethics, before reversing their course the next day after Trump voiced his disapproval.

On Monday evening, GOP members of the House voted 119–74, to place the independent Office of Congressional Ethics under House Ethics Committee at their conference meeting as part of their new rules package. Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) were against the changes that immediate faced a backlash and bad press for the new GOP majority.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) also spoke out against the GOP’s plan. Pelosi wrote in a statement released after the GOP reversed their vote, “House Republicans showed their true colors last night, and reversing their plans to destroy the Office of Congressional Ethics will not obscure their clear contempt for ethics in the People’s House. Republicans should remember the strength of public outrage they faced in the space of 12 hours as they scheme to do lasting damage to the health and economic security of millions and millions of hard-working families.” The OCE was created in 2008 under Pelosi’s speakership and acts as an independent non-partisan office investigating any Congressional wrongdoing.

The proposal was authored by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.). The changes would have prevented the OCE from investigating any criminal wrongdoing . Instead any issue would have had to be sent to the House Ethics Committee or law enforcement, and the HEC would have been given the power to cease any investigation. Additionally, the OCE would have ignored anonymous tips on wrongdoing essentially ending whistleblowing, and the changes would have stripped the office of a communication director aimed at hushing any wrongdoing in Congress and hiding it from the press and public. The concept was the exact opposite of Trump’s promise to drain Washington swamp, instead, it would have made it easier to fill the swamp and keep it all hidden.

The next morning the President-elect let his disapproval be known in two tweets. Trump wrote, “With all that Congress has to work on, do they really have to make the weakening of the Independent Ethics Watchdog, as unfair as it…their number one act and priority. Focus on tax reform, healthcare and so many other things of far greater importance!” Trump also used the Hashtag #DTS, “Drain the Swamp,” one of his campaign slogans, that he reiterated after the campaign that he would try to keep during his presidency. A senior GOP aide told CNN just how much Trump’s disapproving tweets altered the GOP’s course on the issue, “It’s safe to say that Trump’s tweets probably added to that pressure but it was already being heavily covered in the press.”

Soon after the Republican conference held an emergency meeting reversing their course. Before noon, on Tuesday the GOP conference voted to take out the changes to the ethics office from the 115th Congress’ rules package that was later voted on in the afternoon. Incoming House Ethics Committee Chairwoman Susan Brooks (R-Ind.) still believes the OCE needs to be reformed but in a bipartisan matter and will bring the matter up later in the session.

Ryan assured the public in a statement explaining what the GOP representatives planned was not meant that the party would stifle abuses of power. In a statement, the speaker explained, “After eight years of operation, many members believe the Office of Congressional Ethics is in need of reform to protect due process and ensure it is operating according to its stated mission. I want to make clear that this House will hold its members to the highest ethical standards and the Office will continue to operate independently to provide public accountability to Congress.”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Politics July 7, 2016: McConnell wants the FBI to release Clinton’s interview

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McConnell wants the FBI to release Clinton’s interview

By Bonnie K. Goodman

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 06: U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (3rd L) speaks as (L-R) Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY), Sen. John Thune (R-SD) and Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) listen during a news briefing July 6, 2016 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. Senate GOPs held a weekly policy luncheon to discuss Republican agenda.Ê (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 06: U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (3rd L) speaks as (L-R) Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY), Sen. John Thune (R-SD) and Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) listen during a news briefing July 6, 2016 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. Senate GOPs held a weekly policy luncheon to discuss Republican agenda.Ê (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

A day after FBI Director James B. Comey announced that the FBI would not be prosecuting former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is calling for the FBI to release Clinton’s interview. On Wednesday, July 7, 2016, McConnell joined Republican leaders’ chorus criticizing the FBI for deciding not to prosecute Clinton for using a private email server during her tenure and risking national security.

McConnell requested the FBI release Clinton’s interview transcript during his weekly press briefing. The majority leader said, “It’s pretty clear … that the American people would like to see what Hillary Clinton said to the FBI.” McConnell and Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) believe Clinton might have perjured herself. The FBI conducted the three-hour interview with Clinton on Saturday, July 2.

Politics June 23, 2016: House Democrats hold sit-in protesting over gun control pledge no bill no break

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House Democrats hold sit-in protesting over gun control pledge no bill no break

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 23, 2016 9:43 AM MST
Democrats staged a sit-in on the House floor on Wednesday and demanded a vote on gun control legislation.

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Democrats staged a sit-in on the House floor on Wednesday and demanded a vote on gun control legislation.
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Politics June 22, 2016: Rubio announces reelection run for Florida Senate seat leads in polls

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Rubio announces reelection run for Florida Senate seat leads in polls

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 22, 2016 11:45 AM MST
Sen. Marco Rubio said after dropping out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination that he wouldn't run for re-election.

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Sen. Marco Rubio said after dropping out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination that he wouldn’t run for re-election.
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Politics June 21, 2016: Senate rejects all gun control measures put to vote after Orlando shooting

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Senate rejects all gun control measures put to vote after Orlando shooting

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 21, 2016 9:04 AM MST
 Senate Republicans and Democrats voted against dueling measures that would have strengthened gun-control laws, June 20, 2016
Senate Republicans and Democrats voted against dueling measures that would have strengthened gun-control laws, June 20, 2016
Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

 

Politics June 15, 2016: Marco Rubio reconsidering running for reelection for Florida Senate seat

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Marco Rubio reconsidering running for reelection for Florida Senate seat

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 15, 2016 10:52 PM MST

Florida Senator Marco Rubio is inching closer to running for reelection, after being reluctant to consider running after his failed presidential bid and his friend Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera running for his seat, June 15, 2016
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Politics June 2, 2016: Speaker Paul Ryan formally endorses presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump

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Speaker Paul Ryan formally endorses presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump

By Bonnie K. Goodman

June 2, 2016 5:01 PM MST

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has finally endorsed presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump after a month of rapprochement, June 2, 2016
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
House Speaker Paul Ryan endorsed Donald Trump on Thursday, ending an extraordinary public split between the GOP’s presumptive presidential nominee and the Republican Party’s most powerful elected official.

Politics May 31, 2016: McConnell, Trump drafting Rubio to run for re-election to Florida Senate seat

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McConnell, Trump drafting Rubio to run for re-election to Florida Senate seat

May 31, 2016, 1:18 PM MST
Republican leaders are urging Marco Rubio to run for re-election for his Senate seat from Florida in attempt to maintain control of the Senate come November, May 31, 2016
Republican leaders are urging Marco Rubio to run for re-election for his Senate seat from Florida in attempt to maintain control of the Senate come November, May 31, 2016
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McConnell, Trump drafting Rubio to run for re-election to Florida Senate seat

May 31, 2016

Politics May 13, 2016: Trump goes to Washington meets Ryan agree on unity but still no endorsement

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Trump goes to Washington meets Ryan agree on unity but still no endorsement

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 13, 2016 3:21 AM MST

Presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump went to Washington to meet with Speaker Paul Ryan and GOP leadership, Ryan and Trump are moving closer, but Ryan still will not endorse the nominee, May 12, 2016
Presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump went to Washington to meet with Speaker Paul Ryan and GOP leadership, Ryan and Trump are moving closer, but Ryan still will not endorse the nominee, May 12, 2016
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Politics May 5, 2016: Speaker Paul Ryan rips Trump says he is not ready to support him as GOP nominee

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Speaker Paul Ryan rips Trump says he is not ready to support him as GOP nominee

By Bonnie K. Goodman

May 5, 2016 10:14 PM MST

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan is joining the group of Republican leaders who will not support Donald Trump as the presumptive GOP nominee, but Trump is not letting Ryan get away with his remarks, May 5, 2016
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan is joining the group of Republican leaders who will not support Donald Trump as the presumptive GOP nominee, but Trump is not letting Ryan get away with his remarks, May 5, 2016
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Politics April 28, 2016: Former Speaker John Boehner describes Ted Cruz as Lucifer in the flesh

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Former Speaker John Boehner describes Ted Cruz as Lucifer in the flesh

By Bonnie K. Goodman

April 28, 2016 12:30 PM MST

 Former Speaker John Boehner does not believe Texas Senator Ted Cruz should be the GOP's nominee calling him Lucifer and a son of a bitch at a town hall at Stanford University, April 27, 2016
Former Speaker John Boehner does not believe Texas Senator Ted Cruz should be the GOP’s nominee calling him Lucifer and a son of a bitch at a town hall at Stanford University, April 27, 2016
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Politics March 16, 2016: Obama decides on Judge Merrick Garland for Supreme Court nominee

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Obama decides on Judge Merrick Garland for Supreme Court nominee

By Bonnie K. Goodman

March 16, 2016 9:08 AM MST

Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland said Wednesday during his nomination announcement that justices must be faithful to the Constitution and 'put aside personal views or prejudices.'

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Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland said Wednesday during his nomination announcement that justices must be faithful to the Constitution and ‘put aside personal views or prejudices.’
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Politics January 7, 2016: GOP Congress makes history sends first ObamaCare repeal to president’s desk

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GOP Congress makes history sends first ObamaCare repeal to president’s desk

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 7, 2016 9:31 AM MST

The Republican Congress finally passed their Obamacare repeal bill and they are sending it to the president's desk, where he vowed to veto it, Jan. 6, 2016
The Republican Congress finally passed their Obamacare repeal bill and they are sending it to the president’s desk, where he vowed to veto it, Jan. 6, 2016
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Politics January 4, 2016: Obama fires up Republicans with gun control executive actions announcement

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Obama fires up Republicans with gun control executive actions announcement

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 4, 2016 7:58 PM MST

President Barack Obama discussed with reporters his gun control executive actions in the Oval Office, Republicans are already voicing their opposition, Jan. 4, 2016

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President Barack Obama discussed with reporters his gun control executive actions in the Oval Office; Republicans are already voicing their opposition, Jan. 4, 2016
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Politics January 1, 2016: Huckabee calls Obama’s NSA spying on Congress, Netanyahu an impeachable offense

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Huckabee calls Obama’s NSA spying on Congress, Netanyahu an impeachable offense

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, January 1, 2016 1:49 PM MST

GOP candidate Mike Huckabee believes if President Obama truly did monitor Congressional members' communication with Israeli leaders, Obama should be impeached and forced to resign, Dec. 30, 2015
GOP candidate Mike Huckabee believes if President Obama truly did monitor Congressional members’ communication with Israeli leaders, Obama should be impeached and forced to resign, Dec. 30, 2015
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Politics December 19, 2015: Congress passes omnibus spending and tax break bills averts government shutdown

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Congress passes omnibus spending and tax break bills averts government shutdown

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 19, 2015, 7:22 AM MST

Congress passed a sweeping omnibus spending bill and tax breaks bill with bipartisan support funding the government for the next year, ending any talk of a government shutdown until then, Dec. 18, 2015
Congress passed a sweeping omnibus spending bill and tax breaks bill with bipartisan support funding the government for the next year, ending any talk of a government shutdown until then, Dec. 18, 2015
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Politics December 16, 2015: Ted Cruz investigated for leaking classified information during the GOP debate

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Ted Cruz investigated for leaking classified information during the GOP debate 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 16, 2015, 7:25 PM MST

The Senate Intelligence Committee is investigating Ted Cruz for possibly revealing classified information about National Security Agency's surveillance program during the GOP debate, Dec. 16, 2015
The Senate Intelligence Committee is investigating Ted Cruz for possibly revealing classified information about National Security Agency’s surveillance program during the GOP debate, Dec. 16, 2015
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Politics December 11, 2015: Congress close to reaching spending bill deal averts government shutdown again

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Congress close to reaching spending bill deal averts government shutdown again 

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 11, 2015, 7:42 PM MST

Congress passed a short-term spending bill giving them another five days to pass the 2016 omnibus-spending bill; Senate leaders want to unveil the bill on Monday, but House leaders believe it will take longer, Dec. 11, 2015
Congress passed a short-term spending bill giving them another five days to pass the 2016 omnibus-spending bill; Senate leaders want to unveil the bill on Monday, but House leaders believe it will take longer, Dec. 11, 2015
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Politics December 10, 2015: Obama signs bipartisan No Child Left Behind replacement education law

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Obama signs bipartisan No Child Left Behind replacement education law

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, December 10, 2015, 4:01 PM MST

President Barack Obama delivers remarks during the signing of the Every Student Succeeds Act ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Dec. 10, 2015

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President Barack Obama delivers remarks during the signing of the Every Student Succeeds Act ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Dec. 10, 2015
Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon / White House YouTube

Politics November 30, 2015: Speaker Ryan invites Obama to his last State of the Union address as president

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Speaker Ryan invites Obama to his last State of the Union address as president

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, November 30, 2015, 5:13 PM MST

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan sent President Barack Obama an invitation letter for his last State of the Union Address; it will be the earliest date the address has been delivered in nearly 40 years, Nov. 30, 2015
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan sent President Barack Obama an invitation letter for his last State of the Union Address; it will be the earliest date the address has been delivered in nearly 40 years, Nov. 30, 2015
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Politics November 20, 2015: Obama v Congress on bill blocking refugees, will there be a government shutdown?

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Examiner_Articles

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Obama v Congress on bill blocking refugees, will there be a government shutdown?

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Examiner.com, November 20, 2015, 12:01 PM MST

President Barack Obama, Congressional Republicans and some Democrats in a battle over admitting Syrian refugees after the Paris terror attacks, the showdown could lead to a government shutdown in December, Nov. 19, 2015
President Barack Obama, Congressional Republicans and some Democrats in a battle over admitting Syrian refugees after the Paris terror attacks, the showdown could lead to a government shutdown in December, Nov. 19, 2015
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images