Education April 2, 2018: Stanford remains most selective elite university for Class of 2022 with record-low 4.3 percent acceptance rate 

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Stanford remains most selective elite university for Class of 2022 with record-low 4.3 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Stanford University remains the most coveted and selective school for the Class of 2022. Stanford is beating their own records, having both the lowest acceptance rate and the highest number of applications in the school’s history. On Friday, March 30, 2018, at 4 p.m. Stanford sent out acceptances to 1,290 students for their regular admission cycle. The university accepted a total of 2,040 students out of a record 47,450 applications, making the acceptance rate only 4.3 percent.

This year Stanford received 3000 more applications than they did for the Class of 2021. Previously, on Dec. 8, 2017, Stanford had sent out acceptance to 750 students as part of their restrictive early action program. Stanford’s was not only the lowest in the school’s history but also the lowest of all colleges and universities. Stanford easily beat rival Harvard, the Ivy League’s most selective school; this year Harvard’s acceptance rate was a record 4.59 percent.

Richard H. Shaw, dean of admission and financial aid remarked on the application pool this year. Shaw told the Stanford News “We continue to be awed and humbled by the interest Stanford receives from outstanding young people around the world. Indeed, the incredible strength of the students applying to Stanford is simply awesome, and all candidates who applied will have wonderful choices in higher education.”

This year’s acceptance rate was a third of percentage point less than last year’s rate. Last year, Stanford admitted only 2,050 students to the Class of 2021, 1,329 in the regular admission cycle and 721 during the restrictive early admission cycle. The university received a “record” 44,073 applications vying for a spot at Stanford. The acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was only 4.65 percent hailed also as “the lowest in Stanford’s history.”

The Class of 2022 is one of the university’s most diverse both geographically and socio-economically. Shaw commended the incoming class, saying “We are proud of the intellectual strength and incredible diversity represented by the Class of 2022. Overall, the admitted students reflect the broad diversity of our country and the world. These students already have had an incredible impact on their communities, and we know they will contribute to the world in immeasurable ways.”

Geographically, the incoming class has students coming from all 50 states and the territories. The class consists of 11.4 percent of international students coming from 63 countries. Socio-economically, the class attracted the largest number of first-generation college students of all the Ivy League and elite universities, with 18.3 percent. Where the school still needs to make strides is gender parity, although close, there are still men accepted than women, 50.8 to 49.2 percent.

Stanford, however, has one of the best financial aid programs of all the elite schools, attracting many deserving lower-income students. For students coming from families with an annual income of less than $125,000, tuition is covered through “need-based scholarships, federal and state grants and/or outside scholarship funds.” Parents still, however, have to pay room and board. Students coming from families, who only earn 65,000 a year have everything covered.

Stanford also released the majors most of the incoming freshmen are planning on taking. According to Stanford News, “65 percent expressing interest in Humanities and Sciences programs, 30 percent in Engineering, and 3.5 percent in Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences.” Students have until May 1, to notify the University of their decision.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

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Education March 30, 2018: Ivy League: Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth and Penn’s acceptance rates for Class of 2022 most selective year on record 

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Ivy League: Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth and Penn’s acceptance rates for Class of 2022 most selective year on record

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

(Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

It is Ivy League decision day. Thursday afternoon, March 28, 2018, between 3 and 7 pm, the Ivy League universities sent out acceptances as thousands of anxious high school seniors found out if they would join the scholarly elite. Late Thursday afternoon Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, The University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Yale University released their acceptance data for the Class of 2022 regular admission cycle. All the Ivy League continued the trend towards record low acceptance rates after receiving record high application numbers. Harvard was the most selective, while Cornell was the least. Students have until May 1, to notify the colleges of their decision.

The following is the Ivy League Class of 2022 acceptance data:

Brown University

Brown University sent out only 1,742 offers of admissions out a historic high of 35,438 applications to the Class of 2022.Their acceptance rate was 7.2 percent overall, while the regular admission cycles rate was only 5.5 percent. In December 2017, Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year.

For the Class of 2021, Brown had an 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. In December 2016 as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

Columbia University

For the Class of 2022, Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s acceptance rate fell nearly a third of a percentage point from last year to 5.5 percent. The college admitted only 2,214 applicants. Like the rest of the Ivy League, Columbia received a record number of applications this year, 40,203 combined, early and regular admission cycles, 8 percent more than for the Class of 2021.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, instead of releasing their early decision data, Columbia University only released the number of applications they received this cycle. This year Columbia received 4,085 early decision applications to Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, just one less than for the Class of 2021.
For the Class of 2021, Columbia College had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants.
Cornell

For the Class of 2022, Cornell University admitted 5,288 students out of 51,328 applications; a new record high for the college. Additionally, Cornell waitlisted 6,684 students. The acceptance was also the college’s lowest at 10.3 percent, while it might be a new low for Cornell, but it is the highest in the Ivy League.

For the Class of 2021, Cornell University had one of the largest acceptance rates of all the Ivies with 12.5 percent. Cornell admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a waitlist. In December 2016, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College had a record year for the Class of 2022, they had the lowest acceptance rate, the highest number of applications in “five years” and accepted the least amount of students since the 1990s. Dartmouth accepted 1,925 students out of 22,033 applications making for an acceptance rate of only 8.7 percent.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, Dartmouth College sent out binding early decision acceptance notifications to 565 high school seniors, out of a record number of applications, 2,270 applications. The college also had their lowest acceptance rate since the 2010 cycle with 24.9 percent. Dartmouth has filled up 47 percent of the Class of 2022 with those accepted for early decision, 558 have already enrolled.

Last year, Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021 out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent. In December 2016 as part of the early decision program for the Class of 2021, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Harvard University

Harvard College will keep its crown as the most selective school in the Ivy League for the Class of 2022. The college beat its own record clocking in a 4.59 percent acceptance rate lower by nearly a half a percentage point from the Class of 2021’s 5.2 percent rate. As the Harvard Crimson noted, “This year marks the first time Harvard’s admission rate has ever dipped below 5 percent.”

Harvard admitted only 1,962 students out of their record 42,749 applications. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.” Of those admitted 998 receiving regular cycle offers of admission, which was according to the Harvard Crimson “2.43 percent of the total 36,119 regular decision applicants, plus the 4,882 students deferred in the early action process.”

On Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m., Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program.

In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021.

Princeton University

For the Class of 2022, Princeton University has the second lowest acceptance of all the Ivies, only behind Harvard College. The rate of 5.5 percent is a record-low and more than half percentage point less than for the Class of 2021. Princeton admitted a total of 1,941 students, 1,142 just this regular admission cycle out of the record 35,370 applications, 14 percent higher than applied for the Class of 2021. Additionally, 1,125 students were waitlisted, normally the university accepts between 18 to 101 students from that list.

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 high school seniors for the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was just 6.1 percent. The university admitted 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program.

University of Pennsylvania

For the Class of 2022, The University of Pennsylvania had a record 44,482 applicants but only accepted 3,371 students. The acceptance rate was 8.39 percent, a new low for the university.

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m., Penn sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent. Penn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program.

Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 22 percent acceptance rate.

Yale University

For the Class of 2022, Yale College lowered their acceptance rate to 6.31 percent after increasing the rate and number of students for the Class of 2021. Yale’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced that it accepted 2,229 students from a “record” 35,306 applications they received this year, which was a 7.3 percent increase in applications. Additionally, 1,102 applicants were waitlisted, however, the college is uncertain whether any on the list will be offered admission.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 of their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications.

Yale admitted 1,550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that opened this past fall.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 29, 2018: Dartmouth has a record year, admits the lowest number to Class of 2022 with 8.7 percent acceptance rate

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Dartmouth has a record year, admits the lowest number to Class of 2022 with 8.7 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Dartmouth College notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. This year was a record year for Dartmouth, they had the lowest acceptance rate, the highest number of applications in “five years” and accepted the least amount of students since the 1990s. Dartmouth accepted 1,925 students out of 22,033 applications making for an acceptance rate of only 8.7 percent.

Dartmouth College had a larger increase in applications than most of the Ivies, jumping 9.8 percent to 22,005 high school senior applying. Lee Coffin, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid remarked, “The big increases in this year’s pools reflect the early success of our expanded recruitment and the new communications plan we have adopted. We have refocused our message to emphasize excellence in teaching and undergraduate access to outstanding teacher-scholars—and students are responding. While the quantity has risen, so has the quality of this year’s applicant pool.”

On Thursday, Dec. 14, Dartmouth College sent out binding early decision acceptance notifications to 565 high school seniors, the smallest number of students of all the Ivy League schools. The college received a record number of applications, 2,270 applications, the first time the school had over 2,000 applications for the early admissions cycle. The college also had their lowest acceptance rate since the 2010 cycle with 24.9 percent; still, that percentage was the largest of all the Ivies. Dartmouth has filled up 47 percent of the Class of 2022 with those accepted for early decision, 558 have already enrolled.

Last year, Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021 out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent, the second largest in the Ivy League. Dartmouth called last year’s class “the most academically accomplished and globally diverse class the College has ever accepted.” In December 2016 as part of the early decision program for the Class of 2021, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Dartmouth also decided to release the academic profile of the accepted students, not just demographics. Of those accepted “97 percent are in the top 10 percent of their high school class,” last year it 96 percent. While the “Mean SAT and ACT scores are 1497 for SATs — a record high — and 33 for ACTs.”

The class is diverse both socio-economically and geographically. The accepted students include an increase in first-generation college students up to 15 percent. Students of color represent half the class, and a majority, 59 percent will graduate from a public high school or charter school.

As with other Ivies, Dartmouth succeeded in attracting lower-income students with their financial aid packages. A majority of the students, 60 percent will apply to financial aid. As the Dartmouth reports, “The College expects to offer around $28 million in need-based scholarships after financial aid awards are finalized.”

Geographically, the students come from all 50 states and the territories. The most predominant states are “California, New York, Massachusetts, Florida and Texas. There is a significant international contingent with 11 percent of the students coming from 65 countries. The majority come from “Brazil, Canada, China, India and the United Kingdom.” Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 29, 2018: Cornell has record-low acceptance rate of 10.3 percent for the Class of 2022

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Cornell has record-low acceptance rate of 10.3 percent for the Class of 2022

Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

(Source: Cornell Admissions Twitter)

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Cornell University notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. This year Cornell admitted 5,288 students out of 51,328 applications; a new record high for the college. Additionally, Cornell waitlisted 6,684 students. The acceptance was also the college’s lowest at 10.3 percent, while it might be a new low for Cornell, but it is one of the highest in the Ivy League.

For the Class of 2021, Cornell University had one of the largest acceptance rates of all the Ivies with 12.5 percent. Cornell admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a waitlist. For the Class of 2020, Cornell had a 13.96% acceptance rate with 6,277 students accepted out of 44,966 applicants. In December 2016, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Jason C. Locke, associate vice provost for enrollment commended the incoming freshman. Locke told the Cornell Sun, “The exceptionally large applicant pool this year produced a most remarkable class. No doubt Ezra would be proud of the Class of 2022!” While Barbara Knuth, senior vice provost commented, “We have admitted a highly talented and accomplished Class of 2022 who will flourish as Cornellians. We look forward to welcoming them into our campus community.”

Cornell is hailing the incoming class as the “most diverse class in university history.” Students that identify as “underrepresented minorities” constitute 33 percent of the class, a number that has been rising for the last four years. With students of color and Asian-American students, the number jumps to a majority of 54 percent. As with most other of the Ivies, there is a large number of first-generation college students, this year’s class welcomes 700 more to Cornell. Additionally, 60 students will commence their studies in the Spring 2019 semester as part of the colleges First-Year Spring Admission program.

“Geographically,” the class is equally diverse, with students accepted from all 50 states and the territories. Internationally, students are coming from 93 countries and represent 9 percent of the class. The most predominant countries include, “Canada, China, India, South Korea, Singapore and the United Kingdom.” Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 29, 2018: Brown admits record-low for the Class of 2022, 7.2 percent acceptance rate

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Brown admits record-low for the Class of 2022, 7.2 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Brown University notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. Brown sent out only 1,742 offers of admissions out a historic high of 35,438 applications to the Class of 2022.Their acceptance rate was 7.2 percent overall, while the regular admission cycles rate was only 5.5 percent.

Brown also saw record number of applications for the Class of 2022, they received 35,368 applications, up 8 percent from the previous year, and the highest increase in the last five years. Dean of Admission Logan Powell lauded the applicants in a statement to the Brown Daily Herald. Powell called those vying to be apart of the Class of 2022 “ as strong as any pool in our history.” Powell commended the students, saying, “We continue to be humbled by the incredible talent and diversity of perspective represented in the applicant pool.”

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year. Although Brown has, a higher acceptance rate than the Ivy League schools, it was a low for them, and Brown’s acceptance rate was only 21 percent for the Class of 2022.

Brown set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. Last year, Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. In December 2016 as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

Dean Powell praised the incoming class’ qualifications. Powell told the Brown Daily Herald, “There were just so many incredibly qualified students in the applicant pool. We could probably admit three classes of students who are enormously academically qualified from the group of applicants we had.” Powell attributes the high number of applications and the lower acceptance rate to “the Brown Promise initiative, the addition of another A Day on College Hill program and the doubling of travel grants.”

For the Class of 2022, Brown revamped their financial aid now calling it the Brown Promise Initiative. As of the next academic year, students will no longer have loans, but grants for financial aid, making Brown more affordable. In the past two years, 65 percent of the Classes of 2021 and 2022 have or intend to apply for aid.

The incoming class will also be the most diverse socio-economically and geographically. Nearly half 49 percent “identify as students of color,” last year only 47 identified. Unlike the rest of the Ivies there will actually be less first generation college students than the previous year, with 13 percent of the class.

Geographically, the admitted students come from only 48 states, predominantly “California, New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Texas.” There is an increase in international students up to 11 percent, coming fro 76 countries, with the most coming from “China, India, the United Kingdom, Canada and Singapore.” Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 29, 2018: Yale admits fewer students to the Class of 2022, lowers acceptance rate to 6.31 percent 

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Yale admits fewer students to the Class of 2022, lowers acceptance rate to 6.31 percent

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Yale College notified the Class of 2022 of the admission decisions. After last year when Yale became the only Ivy to increase their acceptance rate, now Yale is reversing the trend and their rate was lowered to 6.31 percent. Yale’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced that it accepted 2,229 students from a “record” 35,306 applications they received this year. Additionally, 1,102 applicants were wait listed, however, the college is uncertain whether any on the list will be offered admission.

For the Class of 2022, Yale saw the largest increase in applications for their college in the last five years, with 35,305 applications and rising 7.3 percent since the Class of 2021. As the Yale Daily News explains, “Last year, the number of applications rose around 5 percent from 31,439 for the Class of 2020 to 32,891 for the Class of 2021. Before that, the number of applications rose by 4 percent, from 30,227 for the Class of 2019.” In the five years applications have increased by 19 percent.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 of their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications.

Yale admitted 1,550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent.

Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that opened this fall.

Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan commented on the quality and diversity of the incoming class. Quinlan told the Yale Daily News, “All of our admissions officers continue to be impressed with and humbled by the number of highly qualified applicants in our pool. We’re thrilled that the expansion of Yale College has allowed us to offer admission to such a large number of students from such a variety of backgrounds.”

This past fall the college opened to new residential colleges, Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin and plan to accept more students each year as a result. Yale hopes to have 800 more students attending by the time the Class of 2024 is admitted. The college’s expansion goes against the trend of the other Ivies, who are accepting less students and having lowering acceptance rates. Yale plans on having 1,550 freshman enroll in the fall.

Yale is also touting the incoming class as more diverse, with more minorities and lower-income students accepted. Geographically, it also as diverse with students coming from all 50 states and the territories and internationally from 64 countries.

Scott Wallace-Juedes, director of undergraduate financial aid told the Daily News, “Last year Yale was able to offer need-based financial aid awards to more incoming first years than ever before with the expansion of Yale College. My colleagues and I look forward to working with the admitted students to the class of 2022 to ensure that cost of attendance is not a barrier for any admitted student when considering Yale.” Students have until May 1, to notify the college of their decision.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 28, 2018: University of Pennsylvania sets record-low acceptance rate for Class of 2022 of 8.39 percent

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University of Pennsylvania sets record-low acceptance rate for Class of 2022 of 8.39 percent

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League admissions day, on Wednesday, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. the University of Pennsylvania notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. As with other Ivies, Penn saw their number of applications rise and their acceptance rate plummet. Penn had a record 44,482 applicants, but only accepted 3,371 students. The acceptance rate was 8.39 percent a new low for the university, but a higher rate than most of the other Ivies

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. Ivy League school the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent.

The acceptance rate for the Class of 2022 early admission is the lowest in the school’s history, still, the university did not actually admit that much fewer students than last year. Penn admitted 1,312 students this year and last year they accepted 1,354 students. Penn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program. As the student paper, the Daily Pennsylvanian noted, “Last year approximately 55 percent of the total 2,445 spots available were filled by Early Decision applicants.”

Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 22 percent acceptance rate.

Dean of Admissions Eric Furda commented on the incoming Class of 2022, saying “We are thrilled about the possibility of these students joining our community, brining their intellectual curiosities, analytical minds and collaborative spirits to enrich our campus. We can’t wait to meet them.”

With the rise in applications, there is an increase in acceptances in every demographic group. The Daily Pennsylvanian reported that “one in seven admitted students” are first-generation college students, last year it was one in eight. There is also an increase in the number of low-income students, as the university’s “Board of Trustees increased the financial aid budget by 5.3 percent,” giving Penn their “largest financial aid budget in history.”

The students come from all fifty states and the territories. As the Daily Pennsylvanian notes they come predominantly from “Washington D.C. Puerto Rico and Guam. Pennsylvania, New York, California, New Jersey, Florida, and Texas.” More international students were accepted as well up 6 percent and representing 104 countries. Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 28, 2018: Harvard hits new record-low admitting the Class of 2022 with only a 4.59 percent acceptance rate

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Harvard hits new record-low admitting the Class of 2022 with only a 4.59 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Harvard College notified the Class of 2022 of the admission decisions. This year Harvard will keep it’s crown as the most selective school in the Ivy League. The college beat its own record clocking in a 4.59 percent acceptance rate lower by nearly a half a percentage point from the Class of 2021’s 5.2 percent rate. As the Harvard Crimson noted, “This year marks the first time Harvard’s admission rate has ever dipped below 5 percent.” Harvard admitted only 1,962 students out of their record 42,749 applications. Of those admitted 998 receiving regular cycle offers of admission, which was according to the Harvard Crimson “2.43 percent of the total 36,119 regular decision applicants, plus the 4,882 students deferred in the early action process.”

This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”

Harvard College notified students by email on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m. if they were accepted to the Class of 2022, rejected or waitlisted. Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college, and the elite Stanford University only beats it in the country.

In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021. Their admissions represented just 14.5 percent of the applicant pool down only 0.3 percent from 2015. Harvard admitted nearly the same percentage of early applicants as the Class of 2020 a 14.53 acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 versus a 14.49 percent rate for 2020 an addition of less than a half percentage point.

Although Harvard saw a record number of applicants they accepted less students than last year. For the Class of 2021 a record number accepted the colleges offer of admission leading to an overcrowding in the residences. The college also hopes to admit 40 to 100 students on the waitlist, last year none were.

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons commended the incoming freshman class. Fitzsimons expressed to the Crimson, “They are quite an amazing cohort of people because they’re coming from the widest range of economic and ethnic backgrounds in our history.”

The class is one of Harvard’s most diverse ever. Women represent a small majority of the class, with 50.1 percent, up from last year’s 49.2 percent, and for “The first time in 10 years, a majority of accepted students are women.” The diversity extends to all demographic groups, including racial minorities making record strides. African-American students represent 15.5 percent, up from 14.6. This year 12.2 percent of the class are Hispanic students, up from 11.6 percent. Native Americans, however, saw a marginal rise from 1.9 to 2 percent.

Asian-Americans represented the largest minority group accepted. A record 22.7 percent up slightly from 22.2 percent as the university faces a lawsuit on their admission process for the group that has also sparked a United States Department of Justice discrimination investigation. Harvard has steadfastly denied the allegations, blaming other factors for lower rates in admitting Asian-American students in the past.

Harvard has been trying to attract more lower income students with their generous Harvard Financial Aid Initiative, and it has worked with a Class of 2022 that is more economically diverse. The college has made the greatest gains with first generation college students, with 17.3 percent up from 15.1 last year. Over half of Harvard undergrads receive financial aid, 20 percent are from low-income families and do not have to contribute anything to their tuition, while “a record 20.3 percent of the Class of 2022 will be eligible for Federal Pell grants.

This year’s class is diverse geographically as well. They come from “50 states and 90 countries.” International student numbers have rebounded up to 12 percent from last year’s 11.4 percent. Harvard hopes to have a class of 1,665 freshman in the fall. Students have until May 1, to notify the college of their decision.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 28, 2018: Columbia accepts record-low for the Class of 2022 just 5.5 percent acceptance rate

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Columbia accepts record-low for the Class of 2022 just 5.5 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League acceptance day, and on Wednesday afternoon at 3 p.m., March 28, 2018, the admissions office at Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science mailed out their decisions for the regular cycle to the Class of 2022. This year Columbia’s acceptance rate fell nearly a third of a percentage point from last year to 5.5 percent. The college admitted only 2,214 applicants. Like the rest of the Ivy League, Columbia received a record number of applications this year, 40,203 combined, early and regular admission cycles. According to the Columbia Spectator that is 8 percent more than for the Class of 2021. Columbia did not release any demographic data for the incoming freshman class.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, instead of releasing their early decision data, Columbia College only released the number of applications they received this cycle. That evening at 7 p.m. Columbia notified high school seniors whether they would be joining the Class of 2022. This year Columbia received 4,085 early decision applications to Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, just one less than for the Class of 2021.

For the Class of 2021, Columbia College had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants. For the Class of 2020, Columbia had a 6.04% acceptance rate, with 2,193 students accepted out of 36,292 applicants. Columbia is notorious for divulging the least information of all the Ivies about their incoming freshmen class only releasing more data for the upcoming application year. Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 27, 2018: Ivy League colleges Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth see record number of applications for Class of 2022 

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Ivy League colleges Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth see record number of applications for Class of 2022

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

More high school seniors are taking a chance at their dream of attending an Ivy League university. Five of the Ivies released their application data for the Class of 2022; Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth. All saw application increases between 7 and 14 percent, pushing them to all break their previous records. Harvard had 42,742 applications, up 8.2 percent, Yale had 35,305 applications, up 7.3 percent, Brown had 35,368 applications, up 8 percent and Dartmouth with 22,005 applications up 9.8 percent. Princeton, however, saw the biggest increase in applications with up 14 percent. Three of the Ivies; Cornell, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania did not release their data. Increase in financial aid packages at the Ivies are attracting the record number of applicants with more minority and low-income students.

Harvard University

This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”
Harvard’s dean of admissions and financial aid, William R. Fitzsimmons explained how unique their aid program is for students. The dean said, “Harvard’s revolutionary financial aid initiative (HFAI), begun 15 years ago and enhanced since then, led the way again this year in attracting students of excellence from throughout the nation and around the world.

Applications have doubled since the inception of the program — and each year more and more students are excited to learn that Harvard is open to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”
For the majority, Harvard’s cost of tuition and fees is almost the same as public universities, because of their financial aid program. As the Gazette indicates, “More than half of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid, and the average grant is $53,000.” Students with families that make up to $150,000, pay only “10 percent or less of their annual incomes.” There are even allowances in certain cases for students whose families annual incomes are above that amount.

Students coming from the lower income brackets earning less than $65,000 a year can now access a “start-up” grant of $2,000 to help them as they start their studies. The Gazette pointed out for the Class of 2022, “Preliminary measures of economic diversity among applicants rose, with 75.5 percent applying for aid and 25.9 percent requesting an application fee waiver.”

This year’s applicant pool is the most diverse demographically for the college, 50.3 percent are women, there is also a 18.7 percent increase of African-American students, and 14.9 percent more Asian-American student applications. There was also an increase in the number of American students applying from all four regions of the country, but the biggest increase was from the South. International student applications, however, remain the same level as from the Class of 2021.

Yale University

Yale saw the largest increase in applications for their college in the last five years, with 35,305 applications and rising 7.3 percent since the Class of 2021. As the Yale Daily News explains, “Last year, the number of applications rose around 5 percent from 31,439 for the Class of 2020 to 32,891 for the Class of 2021. Before that, the number of applications rose by 4 percent, from 30,227 for the Class of 2019.” In the five years applications have increased by 19 percent.

Yale is trying to “emphasize” that it is not the number of applications, but the calibre and achievements of their applicants That matters. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan, commented to the Daily News, “As always, we do not measure success simply by the number of applications we receive. Quality matters much more to the admissions committee.”

The increase in applicants has been across all demographics especially minority groups. In the last five years, 40 percent more racial and ethnic minorities, who are American citizens and residents applied, and there were 37 percent first-generation college students applying. The number that pleases Associate Director of Admissions Mark Dunn the most is the increase of low-income students, whose numbers have increased by 113 percent. Yale has campaigned to reach out to these “high achieving” students, and this past summer mailed 30,000 incoming high school students emphasizing Yale’s “affordability” with financial aid.

Financial-aid is predominately behind the increase of applications at all the Ivies sand elite universities, but Yale has an additional attraction; two new residential colleges that opened at that start of the academic year. The college accepted 200 more students to the Class of 2021. Dunn commented, “I think this helped inspire more high school students who looked to their graduating peers to consider Yale.”

Brown University

Brown also saw record number of applications for the Class of 2022, they received 35,368 applications, up 8 percent from the previous year.
Dean of Admission Logan Powell lauded the applicants in a statement to the Brown Daily Herald. Powell called those vying to be apart of the Class of 2022 “ as strong as any pool in our history.” Powell commended the students, saying, “We continue to be humbled by the incredible talent and diversity of perspective represented in the applicant pool.”

Although application numbers increased from the Class of 2021 across all demographics they’re was a rise in minorities, first generation and low-income students applying. The largest increase was in the number of students of color applying, with a 16 percent increase, representing 45 percent of all applicants up from 42 percent for the Class of 2021.

There was a 13 percent increase in the number of first generation students applying with 18 percent in total up from 17 percent the previous cycle.
The applicants come from “all 50 states” predominantly “California, New York and Massachusetts.” There it’s also a large international contingent, with applicants from “149 other nations” with the biggest share applying from “China, India, and Canada.” The majority of applicants, 60 percent are women.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College had a larger increase in applications than most of the Ivies, jumping 9.8 percent to 22,005 high school senior applying. Lee Coffin, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid remarked, “The big increases in this year’s pools reflect the early success of our expanded recruitment and the new communications plan we have adopted. We have refocused our message to emphasize excellence in teaching and undergraduate access to outstanding teacher-scholars—and students are responding. While the quantity has risen, so has the quality of this year’s applicant pool.”

Princeton University

Of all the Ivies, Princeton saw the greatest increasein applications and the only one above 10 percent. There were 35,386 high school seniors vying a place in Princeton’s Class of 2022, an increase of 14 percent than from the previous year. To demonstrate just how many more applications Princeton received this cycle the Daily Princetonian noted that in 2008, when students applied for the Class of 2012 there were only 13,695 applications, making a 158 percent increase in applications in the past 10 years.

Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye believes the “University’s expanded outreach” is the reason for the larger numbers. Rapelye told the Princetonian, “We have certainly done more outreach to students in this country and traveled widely throughout the world to make sure that we are reaching qualified students.” As with the other Ivies generous financial aid packages are attracting more lower-income students. Rapelye recounted, “We are working more closely with community-based organizations in cities and national organizations that are working with low-income students.”

The was an increase in applications in all demographic groups, but it was most notable among first generation college students, with 16 percent more applying. This is also the first time since 1990, that Princeton is accepting transfer students; another attempt to reach minorities and low-income students, however only 10 to 12 will accepted. The Class of 2022, however, will be smaller 1296 versus the 1306 accepted last year.

All the Ivy League colleges will notify students of the regular cycle decisions on Wednesday, March 28, 2018, and students will have until May 1, to accept or decline the offer of admission. The colleges will still only accept the roughly the same number of students they do each year , and the record high number of applications will only contribute to record low acceptance rates.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 26, 2018: Harvard to stop requiring SAT and ACT writing section for Class of 2023 Admissions

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Harvard to stop requiring SAT and ACT writing section for Class of 2023 Admissions

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Harvard College will no longer require students applying to the college to take the SAT and ACT writing section. Harvard College

It just became easier to apply to Harvard College. Harvard announced on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, that it will no longer require students applying to the college to take the writing section of the SAT and ACT standardized exams used for college admissions. Harvard will look for students applying to submit other forms of writing samples with their applications. Now a majority of Ivy League colleges do not require the writing section.

College spokesperson Rachel Dane told the Harvard Crimson in an emailed statement about the policy change. Dane explained, “Harvard will accept the ACT/SAT with or without writing, starting with the Class of 2023, entering in August 2019. This change will add an additional component to the comprehensive outreach of the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative (HFAI), which seeks outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”

The majority of high school students taking the exam opt for completing the writing portion. More universities, however, are not requiring the essay section. Only 28 schools want the section completed among them three Ivies; Brown, Dartmouth, and Yale. While Ivies, Columbia, Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania cease to require the section in 2015. Among the other elite universities the Massachusetts Institute of Technology does not require it, but Stanford, the most coveted and selective university still wants applicants to take the writing component.

Removing the exam element is meant to attract more diverse and economically challenged students. The section is an additional cost as the Crimson reports it costs “$14 for the SAT and $16.50 for the ACT, though fee waivers are available for both.”

When the College Board revised the SAT exam they commented on the optional writing section in their official statement. Even the College Board diminished the importance of the section. The Board expressed, “One single essay historically has not contributed significantly to the overall predictive power of the exam. Feedback from hundreds of member admission officers was divided: some respondents found the essay useful, but many did not. The College Board remains steadfast in its commitment to the importance of analytic writing for all students.”

Removing another hurdle with no doubt increase the number of applicants to the most popular Ivy. This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”

Harvard’s dean of admissions and financial aid, William R. Fitzsimmons explained how unique their aid program is for students. The dean said, “Harvard’s revolutionary financial aid initiative (HFAI), begun 15 years ago and enhanced since then, led the way again this year in attracting students of excellence from throughout the nation and around the world. Applications have doubled since the inception of the program — and each year more and more students are excited to learn that Harvard is open to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”

For the majority, Harvard’s cost of tuition and fees is almost the same as public universities, because of their financial aid program. As the Gazette indicates, “More than half of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid, and the average grant is $53,000.” Students with families that make up to $150,000, pay only “10 percent or less of their annual incomes.” There are even allowances in certain cases for students whose families annual incomes are above that amount.

Students coming from the lower income brackets earning less than $65,000 a year can now access a “start-up” grant of $2,000 to help them as they start their studies. The Gazette pointed out for the Class of 2022, “Preliminary measures of economic diversity among applicants rose, with 75.5 percent applying for aid and 25.9 percent requesting an application fee waiver.”

Removing the writing requirement will only continue the trend of helping students reach their potential and attend Harvard regardless of their economic situation. This year’s applicant pool is the most diverse for the college, 50.3 percent are women, a 18.7 percent increase of African-American students, and 14.9 percent more Asian-American student applications. Harvard will notify the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions on March 28.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 15, 2018: MIT releases Class of 2022 admissions rate record low admitted

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MIT releases Class of 2022 admissions rate record low admitted

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

MIT released their lowest admission rate yet 6.7 percent for the Class of 2022 (Source: mit.edu)

Pie day, Wednesday, March 14, 2018, has arrived and that means the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), has released that admissions rate for the Class of 2022. This year, MIT released their lowest number on record, continuing the trend of lower admission rates among Ivy League and elite universities. MIT admitted only 1,464 high school seniors out of the 21,706 that applied this cycle, making the admissions rate one of the university’s most selective at only 6.7 percent. This year’s number is lower than last year’s 7.1 percent admission rate by 0.4 percent. For the Class of 2021, MIT admitted 1,438 students out of the 20,247 that applied both the early action and regular admission cycles. This year, MIT received an increasing number of applications, up by over 1,500 from last year, as more universities see more students apply.

In announcing their admissions for the Class of 2022, MIT boasted the diverse nature of their upcoming freshman class. Chris Peterson, an Assistant Director of Admissions announced, “The admitted Class of 2022 includes archers and architects, fangirls and farmhands, whizzkids and wunderkinds, from Australia to Zimbabwe and everywhere in between. Individually they represent more than 60 countries and 1,000 high schools; together, they constitute an incredible community, each contributing a set of rare skills and perspectives while holding in common the highest caliber of cognition and character.”

Of all the elite and Ivy League universities that released their early admission data in December 2017, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had the lowest acceptance rate for the second year in a row. On Thursday, Dec. 14, MIT sent out 664 early action offers of admission to high school seniors for a place in the Class of 2022. This year MIT received a record 9,557 applications, and their acceptance rate was a record low as well at only 6.9 percent. Of those that applied 65 percent, 6,210 students were deferred for the regular cycle, 26.1 percent, 2498 students were rejected; the remaining applicants withdrew from consideration.

For the Class of 2021, In December 2016, MIT had an acceptance rate of 7.8 percent after receiving a then-record 8,394 applications, which had been up 13.9 percent from the previous year. At the regular admission cycle, MIT admitted at 1,438 students out of 20,247 applications received. MIT is one of the most selective colleges, with corresponding acceptance rates. This was the third year MIT opened their early action admissions to international applicants. The rest of the elite universities and Ivy League universities will release their Class of 2022 admissions data at the end of the month with Stanford University and Harvard College among the most selective schools in the country, but considering MIT’s lowering numbers they will be on the running for the most selective title.
Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 19, 2017: Ivy League, elite schools’ early admission acceptance rates for Class of 2022 MIT has lowest on record, Dartmouth the highest

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Ivy League, elite schools’ early admission acceptance rates for Class of 2022 MIT has lowest on record, Dartmouth the highest

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

(Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

As universities and colleges completed sending out their early admissions offers for the Class of 2022 to hopeful high school seniors let us look at the continuing trend of record low acceptance rates among the Ivy League and most elite universities. Only six of the eight Ivy League universities released data on their early decision and early action cycle. Of the Ivies, Cornell University and Columbia University chose to withhold their data; however, Columbia released the number of applications they received. For the second year in a row, Stanford University, the country’s most selective college refused to release any early admission data. Like last year, they will release their data only after the regular admission cycle when they have finalized all their offers for admission to the Class of 2022.

As has been the trend, Ivy League, and elite universities are becoming more selective, and their early admission rates are falling after receiving a record number of applications. This year is no different the Ivy League and elite universities are continuing the trend and are on track for their most selective year as they choose the Class of 2022. Harvard was the most selective Ivy this early admission cycle, with a 14.5 percent acceptance rate. However, another elite university beat Harvard’s selectivity this early admission cycle. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had the lowest rate, with a record low 6.9 percent of applicants accepted to the Class of 2022. Dartmouth College on the opposite end had the highest acceptance rate with 24.9 percent.

The Ivy League:

Brown University

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year. Although Brown has, a higher acceptance rate than the Ivy League schools, it was a low for them, and Brown’s acceptance rate was only 21 percent for the Class of 2022.

In December 2016 as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent. Brown set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. Last year Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications.

Columbia University

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, instead of releasing their early decision data, Columbia University only released the number of applications they received this cycle. That evening at 7 p.m. Columbia notified high school seniors whether they would be joining the Class of 2022. This year Columbia received 4,085 early decision applications to Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, just one less than for the Class of 2021.

For the Class of 2021, Columbia College had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants. For the Class of 2020, Columbia had a 6.04% acceptance rate, with 2,193 students accepted out of 36,292 applicants. Columbia is notorious for divulging the least information of all the Ivies about their incoming freshmen class only releasing more data for the upcoming application year.

Dartmouth College

On Thursday, Dec. 14, Dartmouth College sent out binding early decision acceptance notifications to 565 high school seniors, the smallest number of students of all the Ivy League schools. The college received a record number of applications, 2,270 applications, the first time the school had over 2,000 applications for the early admissions cycle. The college also had their lowest acceptance rate since the 2010 cycle with 24.9 percent; still, that percentage was the largest of all the Ivies. Dartmouth has filled up 47 percent of the Class of 2022 with those accepted for early decision.

In December 2016 as part of the early decision program for the Class of 2021, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent. Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021 out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent, the second largest in the Ivy League. Dartmouth called last year’s class “the most academically accomplished and globally diverse class the College has ever accepted.”

Harvard University

Harvard College notified students by email on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m. if they were accepted to the Class of 2022, rejected or waitlisted. Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college, and the elite Stanford University only beats it in the country.

In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021. Their admissions represented just 14.5 percent of the applicant pool down only 0.3 percent from 2015. In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. Harvard admitted nearly the same percentage of early applicants as last year a 14.53 acceptance rate this year versus a 14.49 percent rate last year an addition of less than a half percentage point.

Princeton University

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program. Princeton first offered early action admission seven years ago. Students can only apply to Princeton in the early admission cycle, but they can notify the college of their decision by May 1. As Princeton points out the landscape now is radically different from 2011 when the college accepted 21.1 percent of early action applicants. Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was “the lowest in school history.” The University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants.

University of Pennsylvania

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. Ivy League school the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent.

The acceptance rate for the Class of 2022 is the lowest in the school’s history, still, the university did not actually admit that much fewer students than last year. Penn admitted 1,312 students this year and last year they accepted 1,354 students. Penn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program. As the student paper, the Daily Pennsylvanian noted, “Last year approximately 55 percent of the total 2,445 spots available were filled by Early Decision applicants.”

In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a nearly 24 percent acceptance rate. The university targeted goal of 2,445 students enrolling in the fall. Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.”

Yale University

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications. The acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent.

Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. Yale admitted 1550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate.

Elite Universities:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Of all the elite and Ivy League universities that released their early admission data, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had the lowest acceptance rate for the second year in a row. On Thursday, Dec. 14, MIT sent out 664 early action offers of admission to high school seniors for a place in the Class of 2022. This year MIT received a record 9,557 applications, and their acceptance rate was a record low as well at only 6.9 percent. Of those that applied 65 percent, 6,210 students were deferred for the regular cycle, 26.1 percent, 2498 students were rejected; the remaining applicants withdrew from consideration.

For the Class of 2021, In December 2016, MIT had an acceptance rate of 7.8 percent after receiving a then-record 8,394 applications, which had been up 13.9 percent from the previous year. At the regular admission cycle, MIT admitted at 1,438 students out of 20,247 applications received. MIT is one of the most selective colleges, with corresponding acceptance rates. This was the third year MIT opened their early action admissions to international applicants.

Early decision is binding, meaning a student who applies and then is accepted is required to attend the university or college, while early action is non-binding, a student can be accepted and then decide against going to that particular school and can turn down their admission offer. Applying for early admission is not without its risks either, some schools have policies where if a student is rejected in the early admission cycle, cannot reapply for regular admission, however, some universities who do not accept students that applied for early admission, automatically consider them for regular admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 15, 2017: Brown sets early decision admission low for the Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-15-17

Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022 out of a record 3,502 applications making for a 21 percent acceptance rate, the highest among the Ivy League schools. (Source: Brown University Twitter) 

On the last day of early admission decisions from the Ivy League students found out if they were accepted from their coveted school. On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year. Although Brown has, a higher acceptance rate than the Ivy League schools, it was a low for them, and Brown’s acceptance rate was only 21 percent for the Class of 2022.

Previously, Brown set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. Last year Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. Brown also waited listed 1,000 high school seniors. In December as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

In addition to the 738 lucky students that were admitted, 2318 were deferred to the regular admission cycle for reconsideration, 429 were denied admission, there were 14 incomplete applications, and three students withdrew from consideration. The accepted students come from “33 nations and 43 states,” last year they came from “39 nations and 41 U.S. states.” This year a majority of the students come from New York (110), California, and Massachusetts. Most international students are coming from China, the United Kingdom, and India.

This year’s class is the most diverse accepted by Brown during the early decision cycle. As the Brown Daily Herald indicated, “Over 38 percent of the early decision admits — 283 students — identify as people of color, which marks the highest percentage in the University’s history.” Last year, Brown accepted 36 percent of the early decision class that considered themselves people of color, which is “African American, Latino/a Native American, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, or Asian.” The trend continues that more women are accepted than men are to Brown’s early decision. This year “430 students were female and only 308 were male. Last year, “411 accepted students were female and 284 were male.”

Half the students accepted as part of early decision applied for financial aid. This year as part of $30 million Brown Promise Campaign, undergraduate students will not receive loans but grants. Dean of Admission Logan Powell commented, “We couldn’t be happier because it’s a great opportunity for those students offered admission, and obviously a wonderful opportunity for Brown to have those students.” There was, however, a decrease in the number of students accepted who would be the first generation attending college, with only 10 percent, down from 13 percent last year.

Powell said the same type of students accepted in the early decision cycle would be accepted during the regular cycle. Powell said, “Every early decision student who was admitted is exceptional, and would have been admitted in our regular decision round.” The same can be same for the rest of students admitted to the other Ivy League universities this past week. On Tuesday, Dec. 12, Harvard University admitted just 964 students out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college.

Earlier on Wednesday, Princeton University sent out early action admissionoffers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022, out of a record 5,402 applications. Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted. Also on Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022, out of record number 7,074 applications, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent. Also on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale University notified the Class of 2022 their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, out of a record number 5,733 applications, with a 14.7 percent acceptance rate.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

 

 

Education December 14, 2017: Yale admits record low for early action admission to Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Yale University’s acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent. (Source: Yale University News)

On the last day of early admission decisions from the Ivy League students found out if they were accepted from their coveted school. On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications. The acceptance rate this early admission cycle was the second lowest of all the Ivies at only 14.7 percent behind Harvard’s 14.5 percent and the same as Princeton’s 14.7 percent.

Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. Yale admitted 1550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. In December, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle.

Of the record 5,733 applications, aside from the 842 accepted high school seniors, 55 percent of the applicants were deferred to the regular admission cycle, 29 percent were downright refused and “2 percent either withdrew or submitted incomplete forms.” Yale has a single-choice early action admission, meaning students can only apply to Yale in the early admission cycle, however it is non-binding and students have until May 1 to notify Yale of their decision.

Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan made a statement to the college’s student paper the Yale Daily News. Quinlan commented on the incoming class, saying, “The Admissions Committee was very impressed with this year’s early applicant pool across every dimension. We are pleased to offer admission to this first group of students in the Class of 2022, and look forward to admitting a much larger group of students through our Regular Decision process this spring.”

Quinlan also commented that Yale is continuing their trend to increase the number of students admitted due to the new residential colleges. The Dean of Admissions said, “The addition of Benjamin Franklin and Pauli Murray colleges enables us to bring to Yale more students from a more diverse collection of backgrounds. The combination of expanding enrollment and greater representation of students from under-resourced backgrounds means more opportunity for more students.”

Yale provided very little information about the pool of those accepted to early action. Director of Outreach and Communications Mark Dunn only commented in November about the applications to early action admission. Dunn said they included “virtually every subgroup of applicants that the admissions office tracks.” Yale has enhanced their financial packages for those coming from “lower-income backgrounds,” in an effort to increase diversity. Yale received applications from “49 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 98 foreign countries.” Dean of Admissions Quinlan wants the final Class of 2022 to be 1,550 students enrolled.

On Tuesday, Dec. 12, Harvard University admitted just 964 students out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college. Earlier on Wednesday, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022, out of a record 5,402 applications. Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted. Also on Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022, out of record number 7,074 applications, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 14, 2017: University of Pennsylvania has record low early admission acceptance rate to the Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-14-17

The University of Pennsylvania received a record number of application to the Class of 2022 leading to their lowest early decision acceptance rate in history. Source: Wikipedia Commons

Mid-December is early admission decision time and almost every other day anxious high school seniors await an email from the school of their dreams that will determine their future. On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. Ivy League school the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent.

The acceptance rate for the Class of 2022 is the lowest in the school’s history, still, the university did not actually admit that much fewer students than last year. Penn admitted 1,312 students this year and last year they accepted 1,354 students. UPenn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program. As the student paper, the Daily Pennsylvanian noted: “Last year approximately 55 percent of the total 2,445 spots available were filled by Early Decision applicants.”

Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a nearly 24 percent acceptance rate. The university targeted goal of 2,445 students enrolling in the fall.

The sheer increase in the number of applications received is the only reason for Penn’s significantly smaller acceptance rate. More high school seniors are applying for early admission programs giving schools more quality applicants to choose from for their incoming class. This year Penn saw an increase of 9.5 percent from last year in the number of early decision applications they received, that number is 38 percent more from when the Class of 2018 applied in 2013. For the Class of 2021, Penn received what was then a record 6,147 applications.

Penn released, however, very little demographic data about the early decision Class of 2022. This year’s class comes 54 countries and 45 states and Washington D.C., Puerto Rico, while last year, they came from 44 countries and 46 states. Additionally, despite only 16 percent of their applications coming from legacies, “the children or grandchildren of Penn alumni,” the school admitted a whopping 25 percent to their early decision program. Meanwhile, only “11 percent of student accepted are first-generation college students,” the same as last year. This year’s Penn applicants included as the Daily Pennsylvanian pointed out, “47 percent are women, 11 percent are first-generation college students, 40 percent self-identify as students of color, 16.5 percent were educated outside of the United States, and 16 percent are legacies.”

Dean of Admissions Eric Furda released an email statement commenting on the early decision Class of 2022. Furda noted, “It does not appear that travel bans and immigration legislation has impacted Penn’s applicant pool.” Furda believes the new SAT positively affected the students applying to the school. The Dean of Admissions said, “With changes to format and scoring instituted by The College Board in 2016, most students received higher scores on the rSAT than what they would have received in the older SAT format. The rSAT represents a significant change within the larger college application landscape that may have impacted college search, choice, and application behavior on the part of individual students.”

Early decision is binding, meaning a student who applies and then is accepted is required to attend the university or college, while early action is non-binding, a student can be accepted and then decide against going to that particular school and can turn down their admission offer. Applying for early admission is not without its risks either, some schools have policies where if a student is rejected in the early admission cycle, cannot reapply for regular admission, however, some universities who do not accept students that applied for early admission, automatically consider them for regular admission.

Despite having the lowest acceptance rate in their school’s history, so far, Penn has the highest acceptance rate among the Ivy League schools that released their data. On Tuesday, Dec. 12, Harvard University admitted just 964 students out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college. Earlier on Wednesday, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022, out of a record 5,402 applications. Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 13, 2017: Princeton hits new early action admission record low with Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-13-17

Princeton admitted a record low acceptance rate to their early action admissions for the Class of 2022, only 14.7 percent of applicants. Source: Princeton Admissions Twitter)

Another day in December another Ivy League university sends out their early admission decision to high school seniors. On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was “the lowest in school history.” The University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program. Princeton first offered early action admission seven years ago. Students can only apply to Princeton in the early admission cycle, but they can notify the college of their decision by May 1. As Princeton points out the landscape now is radically different from 2011 when the college accepted 21.1 percent of early action applicants.

Those accepted to the Class of 2022 early action come from “48 countries and 44 states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.” Last year to the Class of 2021, Princeton accepted students from 45 countries and 42 states plus DC and Puerto Rico. The university says that 44 percent of the accepted students this year are minorities, up from 43 percent last year. This year 11 percent are international students, the same as last year. Both this year’s class and last year’s is evenly balance by gender, 50 percent are women and 50 percent are men.

For the Class of 2022 fewer students come from public or charter schools, with 56 percent versus 57 percent for the Class of 2021. The same amount of students who are the first in their family to attend college were accepted as last year, with 14 percent. This year Princeton accepted more legacy students, the children of alumni, with 17 percent of the Class of 2022, whereas they represented 16 percent of the Class of 2021 early action admissions.

Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye commented on this year’s class. Rapelye said, “The admission committee was impressed with the strength and depth of the pool this year. Our admission officers worked long hours reading the applications of the candidates, and we had to make difficult choices. The admitted students have demonstrated extraordinary academic achievements as well as extracurricular talents throughout high school. We are thrilled with the quality of these students and their commitments to their communities. We look forward to all the ways they will contribute to Princeton.”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education December 12, 2017: Harvard continues trend of accepting record low early admissions applicants to Class of 2022

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-12-17

Harvard is continuing the trend of accepting a record low percentage of applicants to early admissions. (Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

Harvard College shattered many high school seniors’ dreams admitting their one of their lowest rate of early admission applicants to the Class of 2022. Harvard is one of the first of the Ivy League universities to notify students if they were accepted for early admission. Harvard College notified students by email on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m. if they were accepted to the Class of 2022, rejected or waitlisted. Harvard admitted just 964 studentsout of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college, and the elite Stanford University only beats it in the country.

As has been the trend, Ivy League, and elite universities are becoming more selective, and their early action admission rates are falling after receiving a record number of applications. This year is no different if Harvard’s numbers are an indication the Ivy League and elite universities are continuing the trend and are on track for their most selective year as they choose the Class of 2022.

Although 964 lucky seniors were accepted to the holy grail of Ivy League universities, others were not as lucky. Among the remaining applicants, 73 percent or 4,882 students have another opportunity and they were deferred to the regular admission cycle. However, for 9.2 percent or 611 students the dream is over, they were outright rejected. There were an additional 173 students who did not properly complete their applications and they also have the opportunity to complete them for regular cycle consideration.

Harvard admitted nearly the same percentage of early applicants as last year a 14.53 acceptance rate this year versus a 14.49 percent rate last year an addition of less than a half percentage point. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021. Their admissions represented just 14.5 percent of the applicant pool down only 0.3 percent from 2015. In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate.

William R. Fitzsimmons, the dean of admissions and financial aid, commented to student paper The Harvard Crimson on the record number of early admissions’ applicants for the Class of 2022. Fitzsimmons expressed, “The one thing we can say with certainty is that the numbers rose this year. In general terms, it appears that more institutions had increases than the reverse… Early admission, in one form or another, is the new normal.”

Harvard’s Class of 2022 is even more diverse than last year, partially due to legal scrutiny. More minorities were admitted with 13.9 percent of early African-American applicants being accepted up from 12.6 percent of were admitted last year. This year saw a slight rise in Hispanic students accepted with 9.8 percent, up from 9.5 percent last year. Native American and Native Hawaiian applicants made in-roads with 1.8 percent accepted early up from last year’s paltry 1.1 percent. Of all groups, women saw their numbers decrease down one percent from 48 percent to 47 percent.

The minority group with the largest early acceptance rate was Asian-Americans with 24.2 percent accepted this year up from 21.1 percent in last year’s early admissions cycle. Harvard is facing an investigation into their admission rates of Asian Americans by the Department of Justice and a private lawsuit by former applicants. The DOJ began investigating Harvard’s affirmative action practices this past summer. The DOJ wanted the college to hand over is applications and student records and threatened to sue if they would not comply with Dec. 1. The DOJ is now contemplating Harvard’s counteroffer to allow the review of redacted student records

Harvard is also facing a separate private lawsuit by rejected Asian American applicants, who are accusing the college of discriminatory admission practices. The lawsuit is ongoing from 2014 where the college was accused of “employing racially and ethnically discriminatory policies” and that “Harvard’s undergraduate admissions policies and procedures have injured and continue to injure Plaintiff’s members by intentionally and improperly discriminating against them on the basis of their race and ethnicity in violation of Title VI.” The college is providing hundreds of thousands of former applications to comply with that lawsuit.

Harvard is also making an effort to accept more economically disadvantaged students. Among those admitted to early admission, 58 percent are asking for financial aid, and 13 percent needed application fee waivers, while last year only 10.7 percent made that request. More First-generation college students were admitted with 10.6 percent to the Class of 2022 up from 8.7 percent for the Class of 2021. Despite concerns about attracting international students, the rate admitted remains steady with 10.2 percent, and 2.3 percent from northern neighbor Canada.

Fitzsimmons noted early admissions usually see less diversity, but this year was an exception. Fitzsimmons told the Crimson, “Traditionally, early programs have tended not to reflect the excellence and diversity that you see out in the world, so one of the real pushes over the past decade or so-and part of it was giving it up and then bringing it back-is to make certain that people from all of those backgrounds do consider early. We’re delighted to see that we had greater economic and ethnic diversity not just in the pool, but in the admitted group.”

For the Class of 2022, Harvard intends to admit fewer students than to the Class of 2021. Fitzsimmons cited overcrowding in the Class of 2021 freshman as the reason for accepting fewer students this upcoming year. For the Class of 2021 much, more students accepted admission offers, leading to “twenty-eight freshmen living in DeWolfe, overflow housing typically reserved for upperclassmen.” The Dean of Admissions wants to admit also students off the waitlist this year. Last year they were unable to able to accept any students off the list. Fitzsimmons said in September his goal to accept “40 to 50 to maybe 100 people” off the waitlist. Now the Dean of Admissions says the college “will certainly be mindful of coming in on target” when it deciding admissions in the regular cycle.

Early decision is binding, meaning a student who applies and then is accepted is required to attend the university or college, while early action is non-binding, a student can be accepted and then decide against going to that particular school and can turn down their admission offer. Applying for early admission is not without its risks either, some schools have policies where if a student is rejected in the early admission cycle, cannot reapply for regular admission, however, some universities who do not accept students that applied for early admission, automatically consider them for regular admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education November 23, 2017: Will American universities continue losing international students to Canada?

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Will American universities continue losing international students to Canada?

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

The University of Toronto in Canada saw the largest increase in international student enrollment this academic year, benefiting the most from the decline to American schools.

With the application period in full swing for the 2018–19 academic year and incoming Class of 2022 freshman class, the question remains if American universities will continue the trend of losing international students. Last year the drop in applications and enrollment was attributed to Donald Trump’s election as president and his immigration policies. Canadian universities benefited from the American loss and received a bump in international applications and enrollments for the 2017–18 academic years. New surveys and reports released by IIE Center for Academic Mobility Research and Impact on Nov. 13, 2017, and Universities Canada on Nov. 22 indicate American universities loss seven percent of their international students, while Canadian schools saw an increase in the double digits. The two studies remained on the opposite ends when came to blaming Trump’s presidency for the differing numbers, with American reports downplaying the factor, while Canadian surveys saw a direct correlation.

A new report by the IIE Center for Academic Mobility Research and Impact and the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairsreleased on Monday, Nov. 13, entitled the “2017 Open Doors® Report on International Educational Exchange” examined at the changing international student rates. The report indicated that just the year prior, the 2016–17 academic year, American universities saw an increase in the peak of total international student enrollment, but a decrease in new international students coming to the US to study.

The 2017 Open Doors report indicates that the US saw a “record” number of international students with 1.08 million studying, the second academic year with over a million students. Open Doors claimed, “This also marks the eleventh consecutive year of continued expansion of the total number of international students in U.S. higher education.” Despite the good news, there were plenty of negatives when looking at the number of new students enrolling; there was a three percent drop from the previous academic year, 10,000 students less to 281,000 new enrollees.

The 2016–17 academic years had only a three percent increase in international students compared to the previous year, the smallest increase since the 2009–10 academic years. Open Door pointed out, “This is the first time that these numbers have declined in the twelve years since Open Doors has reported new enrollments.” The decreases primarily come from two countries Saudi Arabia and Brazil because of the decrease of scholarships. Although the report claims, economic factors trump any political reasons for the decline.

The Open Door gave a glimpse at the present academic year, which shows that the trend is continuing with an additional seven percent loss in new international student enrollees. Although this is the national trend, the results are much different at different universities and colleges. According to IIE, “45 percent of the campuses reported declines in new enrollments for fall 2017, while 31 percent reported increases in new enrollments and 24 percent reported no change from last year.”

International students contribute the most in the STEM fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, serving as support faculty as research and teaching assistants. IIE President and CEO Allan E. Goodman commented on the decline, “Students continue to be attracted to the high quality and diverse opportunities offered by U.S. colleges and universities. But it is critical for U.S. institutions to set strategic goals and be proactive in reaching out to students and families in a wide range of countries in the coming year, and for the United States to keep its academic doors open to students from all over the world.”

IIE released another report at the start of the academic year entitled “Shifting Tides: Understanding International Student Yield for Fall 2017.” The study conducted in March 2017, was created in collaboration with the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers (AACRAO). The study examined the international enrollment rates at 165 colleges and universities in the different regions of the country.

The results proved that President Trump’s policies had little effect on attracting international undergraduate students going from 26 percent in 2016 to just a two percent drop and 24 percent in 2017. Graduate students, however, were more deterred from studying in the US. Colleges and universities saw a 7 percent drop in international students for Masters’ degrees. Last year the number was 26 percent down to 19 percent of graduate student population this year. According to IIE “38 percent of surveyed institutions indicating a decrease in international student applications, 36 percent seeing an increase and 26 percent seeing no change compared to the prior year.”

The decline happened at 46 percent of the schools that participated, but the results varied in the four regions of the country. The South saw the largest drop in international students, with 5 percent from 35 to 30 percent; however, the Northeast did not see any difference remaining at 24 percent. Regional differences have to do with the politics of the areas and schools. The South is the country’s most conservative area, while the Northeast is the most liberal and home of the Ivy League universities that continually attract international students. Four states attract the most international students, California, New York, Texas, and Massachusetts, but only Texas deep in Trump country saw a decline. Texas’ decline was a huge 18 percent loss in international students this year from the 2016 year, 44 percent down to 35 percent.

The United Kingdom’s Times Higher Education sees the decline in international students enrolling at American schools a trend that is longtime in the making and independent of Trump. Analyst Marguerite Dennis wrote an op-ed last January 2017 entitled, “Dwindling US international student numbers? Don’t blame Trump!” On the eve of Trump inauguration as the 45th president of the United States, 60 percent of international students from 118 countries said a Trump presidency would deter their enrollment in US schools a number that never materialized. Canadian saw a surge in American students visiting their perspective and future student websites. The University of Toronto saw 10,000 visitors the day after Trump’s election, up from only 1,000 the day before when the news predicted democratic nominee Hillary Clinton would win the election.

Dennis looked at historical data and found that the decline is a trend 17-year trend in the making commencing in 2001. At that point, the year of the terror attack on the World Trade Center “28 per cent of all international students enrolled” in American schools, by 2014 that number decreased to 22 percent. Dennis attributes two reasons for the decline, less Chinese students enrolling and rising tuition costs. Dennis claims, “In 2014–15, there were 304,040 Chinese studying in the US, 10.8 per cent more than the previous year. However, in 2013–14 the increase was 21.4 per cent.” Additionally, since 2008 tuition at American schools has increased by 28 percent.

IIE claimed that students from the Middle East and India were the most reluctant to enroll in the US because of Trump’s travel ban and were the most concerned about their ability to obtain a student visa. Indian students are fearful of enrolling because an Indian engineering student studying in the Midwest was killed in a hate crime. IIE agrees with Dennis that affordability is a major concern for students coming from “sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Canada, Oceania, Latin America and Asia,” except China.

Canadian universities are benefitting the most from international students’ reluctance to study in the US and a lesser extent in Great Britain. This academic year, Canadian universities saw a “record number” of international students enrolled in their institutions. In Canada, they attribute to the growing number of international applicants directly to Trump’s election and his presidency, and Britain’s Brexit vote to leave the European Union, but they are not certain how to maintain their growing student population and translate it into permanent Canadian residents. The major wave of applications commenced with Trump election, with Canadian schools seeing a bump of 20 percent more international applicants.

Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada, IRCC claims there was a 17.5 percent increase in international students from the fall of 2015 to the fall of 2016. According to the Pie News, “the number of new students entering Canada for the first time reached nearly 270,000 — up 22% from 2015 figures.” Universities Canada released data for the fall 2017 enrollment on Nov. 22, calculating only the number of overseas international students. They determined that there was an 11 percent increase of overseas students in 2017 from 2016. As The Times Higher Education reports “the total number of full- and part-time overseas university students in the country to 192,000.”

Universities Canada took their information from Regional university associations, which include, “The Association of Atlantic Universities, the Bureau de Coopération Interuniversitaire (representing Quebec universities), the Council of Ontario Universities and Universities Canada.” In total 96 institutions shared their data for the survey. British Columbia is the province attracting the most international students with a 15.6 percent increase; the province is the home of one of the country’s top three schools, the University of British Columbia. The Canadian government wants to continue to capitalize on the trend and increase the number of international students to 450,000 by 2022.

Canada’s top schools The University of Toronto, the University of British Columbia and McGill University are attracting the brunt of the students. This year the U of Toronto had 17,452 international students at the undergraduate and graduate level representing 20 percent of the student population. The numbers are double than those of ten years ago, wherein 2007 they had 7,380 international students compromising only 10 percent of the student population.

The University of Toronto has the most international students on the continent, followed by the US’ New York University, while the UBC is third. UBC had 14,433 international students in 2016 up from 9,144 in 2012. McGill’s numbers are equally impressive, this academic year their international student population hit 30 percent and is over 12,000 out of 41,000 students. McGill noted that the number represents an “over 10 percent increase from last year and 45 percent from 5 years ago.”

The students are coming from 150 countries, the majority from China, India, South Korea, France, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Japan, Brazil, to a lesser extent Turkey. There is also an increase in American students enrolling in Canadian schools. China has the most students in Canada representing 34 percent of the international student population 57,000 students in 2014, followed by India with 14 percent; only three percent of American students come to Canada for a university education.

Applications to Canadian schools surged last fall and winter from American students distraught by Trump’s electoral victory, but those numbers never materialized in enrollments. The U of Toronto saw an increase of 70 percent from American students, McGill had a 30 percent increase from the US and 16 percent internationally, while UBC saw a 26 percent increase in applications from American students. In 2014, Canada hosted 9,000 American students in their universities.

Paul Davidson, president of Universities Canada claims the increase in international students can be attributed to the country being “known worldwide as a nation that values diversity and inclusion, and our universities are a big part of that.” Davison continued praising the country to the THE, saying, “Students around the globe are increasingly choosing the internationally recognised quality of a Canadian university education, and the benefits for Canada are tremendous.”

In contrast, Richard Levin, executive director of enrolment services and university registrar at the University of Toronto see the enrollment bump being because of the backlash in the US and the UK. Levin told CBC News “Clearly there are things about the international situation — worries about stability, Brexit and the U.S. political environment — that have changed or increased international students’ interest in looking beyond their own countries and beyond the U.S..” Continuing Levin expressed, “Now in places like that, students are looking for alternatives and Canada is presenting as a good one in terms of stability, safety, and inclusiveness.”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

 

Education November 5, 2017: Harvard to lower admission rates for class of 2022

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Harvard to lower admission rates for class of 2022

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Harvard Colleges intends to admit fewer students to the Class of 2022. Harvard College

Every year the admission process becomes more difficult, and the admission rate at the Ivy League and elite top-tier universities shrink. For high school seniors applying for the Class of 2022, this year will even be more difficult to secure an acceptance letter from the school of the dreams. This year Harvard intends to admit fewer students, and the college will extend the deadline for early admissions for students from locations hit by the string of hurricanes and natural disasters in late August and September. The Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons made the twin announcements in a September 2017 interview with college student paper the Harvard Crimson.

Fitzsimmons cites overcrowding in the Class of 2021 freshman as the reason for accepting fewer students this upcoming year. This year much more students accepted admission offers, leading to “twenty-eight freshmen living in DeWolfe, overflow housing typically reserved for upperclassmen.” The Dean of Admissions wants to admit also students off the waitlist this year. Last year they were unable to able to accept any student of the list. Fitzsimmons says his goal is “40 to 50 to maybe 100 people.”

Harvard’s Class of 2021 acceptance rate was 5.2 percent, the second lowest in the country only after Stanford University. Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants. The acceptance rate is almost the same as the Class of 2020 when 5.22 percent or 2,037 students were admitted out a historic high amount of 39,044 applications. For the regular admission cycle, Harvard accepted 1,118 students. In December 2016, as part of their early action program, Harvard accepted 938 applicants out of 6,473 applications for an acceptance rate of 14.5 percent.

The problem was a record number of students accepted their offers of admissions. Close to 84 percent of students accepted their admission offer to the Class of 2021, for the class of 2020, only 80 percent accepted. In May Fitzsimmons commented, “It was the largest number of applications in our history, it was a great yield on admitted students. Everything we could possibly hope for happened in this class.” Changes to the financial aid program led to a more a “socioeconomically diverse” freshman class where “approximately 24 percent were classified as low-income and 17 percent were eligible for Pell Grants.” More financial aid has made Harvard in reach for talented students from economically challenged backgrounds.

Additionally, students in regions hard hit by hurricanes and wildfires in the country, and other natural disasters worldwide will see some leniency in the early admissions applications. Fitzsimmons said, “His office will grant extensions for some early applications and take more time to deliberate on acceptances.” The majority of students will still hear back about early admissions on Dec. 12, but applications will be accepted after the Nov. 1 deadline and considerations will continue through January. The Dean of Admissions told the Crimson, “We could be in for a very different kind of calendar sitting in front of us this year because we want to be fair to these students and give them a complete hearing we can give them.”

Usually, students who applied for early admissions had to submit all documents including “letters of recommendation, transcripts, and secondary school reports” by the Nov. 1 deadline. This year there will be extensions on those documents, additionally, there will be the possibility of application fee waivers and students can take their SAT and ACTs in November and then submit results. The college expects students applying from Texas, Florida and Georgia will be most affected. Texas sends the fourth most applicants and students to Harvard of all states; Hurricane Harvey along with severe flooding in late August hit the state badly. Meanwhile, Florida, which sends the sixth largest amount of students to the college, and Georgia were affected by Hurricane Irma in September.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education July 31, 2017: UC Irvine rescinds admission offers to 500 freshmen because of over enrollment

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By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

 

The University of California, Irvine revoked nearly 500 offers of admissions because of over enrollment, leaving students with very few options just two months before the start of the fall semester. Wikipedia Commons

Nearly 500 incoming freshmen accepted to the University of California Irvine are facing the worst nightmare of their academic careers less than two months before the start of the fall semester. The Los Angeles Times was the first to report on Friday, July 28, 2017, that the UC campus rescinded the admission of 499 incoming students. The university sent the letters last week and the admissions office gave minor or no real reason for the revocation of the admission offers. The university, however, had more students accepting offers of admissions this year than expected. Most including students and the news media believe over enrollment is the only reason UC Irvine is causing a nightmare for these students.

The majority of students were given reasons such as not filing their final transcripts by the due date or bad senior grades. The LA Times notes, “290 of them for transcript issues and the rest for poor senior-year grades, according to campus data.” Students, however, said according to the Chronicle of Higher Education, the reasons were “insufficient or nonexistent.” One student claimed the admission office just said they had “violated a freshman admission requirement,” without elaborating or clarifying. Many of the students who were accused of not sending their transcripts in time even if they had have proof they did. The students now have two choices appeal or change their plans for the fall with community college being almost the only option at this point in the summer.

The university claims they can invoke offers of admissions for the following reasons, “not graduating with their high school diploma,” not maintaining in their senior year a “weighted 3.0 senior-year grade-point average, having “Ds or Fs in UC-approved courses” and not “meeting deadlines for submitting all official high school and college transcripts and test scores.” The number of rescission notices at other University of California campus was minute in comparison UCLA revoked seven admissions, UC San Diego revoked nine, and in the previous two years, UC Davis revoked an average of 150 admission offers where most were because of senior final grades.

Thomas Parham, the university’s vice chancellor for student affairs issued a statement on Friday. Parham explained, “Acceptance into all University of California campuses is provisional, contingent on meeting the contractual terms and conditions that were clearly outlined in your original admissions offer.”

UC Irvine accepted 850 more students than they originally planned for the Class of 2021. In total, According to the LA Times, “7,100 of the 31,103 freshmen who were offered admission to UC-Irvine had accepted it by May.” The university originally hoped their incoming freshman class would consist of approximately 6,250 students. Tom Vasich, “a spokesman for the university,” told the New York Times on Friday, “This is not a typical year. More students than we expected accepted admission to the university.”

A petition was created to object to the revoked admissions notices. According to the LA Times by Thursday, “640 students, relatives, alumni and community members” signed. The petition read, “We are so sorry that UCI admin has decided to ruin students lives…. They NEED to be held accountable for their actions, and they need to know that we will not just sit back and allow them to take advantage of students.”

The cruel predicament UC Irvine put students admitted to their school was rather unprecedented. There have been many well-publicized horror stories of universities sending offers of admissions by mistake, but not rescinding genuine acceptances on mass. In recent years, each cycle there are stories of universities making computer error, accessing the wrong lists and sending out offers of admissions to thousands of students, before retracting and claiming they were all by accident. The New York Times lists recent mistaken admissions controversies at “Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2017, at Tulane University in 2016, and at Carnegie Mellon University in 2015.” In 2009, the UC San Diego sent 28,000 acceptances by error, the campus sent admission offers to all 46,000 applicants instead of just the 18,000 students they admitted.

All of these mistaken acceptances either happened in the early admission cycle or regular cycle, but before students accepted offers of admissions on May 1. Students still had the opportunity to apply or accept other university admission offers. This year, Harvard University caused an uproar after the university revoked admissions for 10 freshmen for inappropriate behavior in mid-April. According to CNN, the ten students posted “explicit memes via a Facebook chat group,” which was “an offshoot of the official Harvard College Class of 2021 Facebook group affiliated with the university.”

According to the student paper the Harvard Crimson, the group “mocked sexual assault, the Holocaust, and the deaths of children.” Harvard Admissions Office let the students know, “As a reminder, Harvard College reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission under various conditions including if an admitted student engages in behavior that brings into question his or her honesty, maturity, or moral character.” The situation at UC Irvine was radically different since none of the admitted students had done anything, which would cause revoking admission.

The UC Irvine students are most left without options so late in the season; if they want to continue their education, they will have to consider community college and then transferring to a university, or try again this upcoming admission cycle. Even more tragic is the many of the students that UC Irvine rescinded admission fall under the category of minorities, from low-income families, or first of their families to attend college, one student was even a former marine. So far 64 of the 265 that filed appealed have been successful in getting their admissions reinstated.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education April 2, 2017: Stanford remains most selective elite university for Class of 2021

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Stanford remains most selective elite university for Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

This year Stanford University is again the most selective university in the United States, beating out all the Ivy League universities including Harvard. On Friday, March 31, 2017, Stanford sent out offers of admissions to 1,329 eagerly awaiting high school seniors. The students are in addition to the 721 accepted in December during early admission.

Stanford admitted only 2,050 students to the Class of 2021. The university received a “record” 44,073 applications vying for a spot at Stanford. The acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was only 4.65 percent “the lowest in Stanford’s history.” In comparison, Stanford’s chief rival Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. The number of applications Stanford received was more than Harvard, which received just fewer than 40,000 applications. The numbers prove the Stanford is not only the most selective but also high school seniors’ dream elite school.

Last year for the Class of 2020, Stanford admitted 2,063 students out of a then unprecedented 43,997 applicants giving the school a historic low acceptance rate of only 4.69 percent. This year, the University beat their previous record just slightly. Richard H. Shaw, the dean of admission and financial aid, hailed the Class of 2021. Shaw expressed, “We continue to be awed and humbled by the interest Stanford receives from outstanding young people around the world.”

Continuing with the Ivy League and elite universities theme of making their incoming class the most diverse ever, Stanford’s Class of 2021 is no different. According to the data, the incoming class comes from all of the US’s 50 states and territories, and internationally from 82 other countries. Demographically the class is equally diverse with the university’s class including 18 percent that are first-generation college students.

Shaw praised the class’ diversity. The dean of admission stated, “This year, in particular, we are proud of the intellectual strength and incredible diversity represented by this group. Over 18 percent of our admitted class will be the first in their families to attend a four-year college and, overall, this cohort of students reflects the diversity of our country and the world. These students have already had an incredible impact on their communities, and we know they will impact the world in immeasurable ways.”

Unlike previous years, Stanford decided not to release complete data about their incoming freshmen. Last December the University announced a new policy of withholding the data until the end of the admission cycle. Stanford refused to release early admissions data to the public. Then the university released a statement explaining their reasons for withholding the information.

The statement indicated, “Stanford will be releasing its application and admission statistics only at the conclusion of the admission cycle, after all, applicants have been notified, and will continue to do so out of respect for our prospective students and applicants.” Students have until May 1 to notify Stanford if they will be accepting their offer of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education April 2, 2017: Yale University admits larges freshmen class ever for Class of 2021

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Yale University admits larges freshmen class ever for Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Yale University Admissions

Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. On Thursday afternoon, March 30, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale offered admission this regular cycle to 1550 students, up 15 percent from last year. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. Yale is the only Ivy League university to increase their acceptance rate.

Last year, Yale had a 6.27% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,972 students accepted out of a record 31,455 applicants. In December, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the wait list.

Yale is the only Ivy League university to increase their acceptance rate this year. The increase in acceptance rate and the number of students accepted is because Yale is opening new residential colleges. In the fall, the school’s Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin colleges will begin operations and increase each incoming class by approximately 800 students. Despite accepting about 2000 students, Yale hopes their final Class of 2021will be 1550 students.

Yale wants the public to know despite accepting more high school seniors this year than ever before; they are still accepting highly qualified students, they are just giving more them the opportunity to study at Yale. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeremiah Quinlan indicated, “Although we were thrilled to send out more offers of admissions this year, I remain humbled by the selectivity of our admissions process. Virtually all of the students we denied will be successful students at other great colleges and universities.”

Yale is hailing the Class of 2021 as the most diverse ever, the same tagline all universities are touting these days. The incoming class comes from all 50 states and 63 countries, and 1,500 high schools. There is also an increase in the minority population accepted promising an incoming class of diversity.

With now 14 residential colleges in four years, Yale’s undergraduate class will go from 5,400 to 6,200 students. Dean of Yale College Jonathan Holloway pointed out, “This expansion touches on every aspect of learning, including teaching, facilities, and financial aid. It also provides a historic opportunity to engage the community in asking what it means to receive an education from Yale.”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education April 2, 2017: Ivy League most selective year Princeton, Harvard admit record lows to the Class of 2021

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Ivy League most selective year Princeton, Harvard admit record lows to the Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

 (Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)

It is Ivy League acceptance day. Thursday afternoon, March 30, 2017, at 5 p.m. the Ivy League universities sent out acceptances as thousands of anxious high school seniors found out if they would join the scholarly elite. Late Thursday afternoon Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, The University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Yale University released their acceptance data for the Class of 2021 continuing the trend towards lower acceptance rates for nearly all schools.

This year there were record number of increases in applications, the CommonApp is making easier for high school seniors to apply to more schools and they are taking advantage of the opportunity to try for the Ivy League. Almost across the board, the Ivy League is becoming even more selective as to whom they allow in the hallowed halls. Students have until May 1, to notify the universities if they plan to attend in the fall.

The following is the Ivy League Class of 2021 acceptance data:

Brown University: Brown University set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. This year Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. This year Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. Brown also waited listed 1,000 high school seniors.

Last year, Brown had a 9% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,919 students accepted out of 32,390 applicants. Brown’s previous record low acceptance rate was in 2015 for the Class of 2019 when they admitted 8.5 percent of their applicant pool. In December as part of early decision admission, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

The students accepted came from all 50 states and 77 nations. The Class of 2021 will also be one of the most diverse, 14 percent are first-generation college students, 47 percent are “students of color,” 62 percent are coming from public schools and 64 percent applied for financial aid. Brown is the exception having a higher acceptance than other Ivies.

Dean of Admission Logan Powell commented on the incoming class. Powell said, “Overall we’re absolutely thrilled with the talent and wide range of perspectives represented in this admitted student group. They continue to be enormously talented (and) they continue to be increasingly diverse… Academically, by all objective measures, is as strong as any in Brown history.” Brown’s targeted goal is 1,665 freshmen entering in the fall.

Columbia University: Columbia College also had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants. Last year, Columbia had a 6.04% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,193 students accepted out of 36,292 applicants. Columbia is notorious for divulging the least information of all the Ivies about their incoming freshmen class only releasing more data for the upcoming application year.

Cornell University: Cornell University had one of the largest acceptance rates of all the Ivies with 12.5 percent. Cornell admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a wait list. Last year, Cornell had a 13.96% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 6,277 students accepted out of 44,966 applicants. In December, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

The incoming freshmen class is one of the most diverse in the school’s history. Of those accepted 1,777, or 30.2 percent are “underrepresented minorities” among them include students of color, w ho represented 52.5 percent of the Class of 2021, up from last year’s 49 percent. Students were accepted from all the states and territories in the US, with the most coming from “California, Florida, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Texas.”

This year, however, there were less international students accepted 9 percent down from last year’s ten percent. The students are from 96 countries, more than last year’s 85 countries. The most are coming from “Canada, China, India, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and the United Kingdom.” Additionally, 700 of the accepted were first-generation college students, while 200 are “recruited athletes.”

Shawn Felton, director of undergraduate admissions, expressed, “This year’s admitted class continues to raise the bar on what it means to be outstanding. I am pleased that we are, once again, well on our way toward our goals to broaden and diversify the incoming class.”

Jason Locke, the associate vice provost for enrollment, commented, “We have admitted an extraordinarily gifted and accomplished class of scholars. We look forward to showcasing Cornell’s exceptional academic offerings and vibrant student experience during our many admitted student events in April.”

Dartmouth College: Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent, the second largest in the Ivy League. Dartmouth is calling this year’s class “the most academically accomplished and globally diverse class the College has ever accepted.” Last year, Dartmouth had a 10.52% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,176 students accepted out of 20,675 applicants. In December as part of the early decision program, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

The high school seniors accepted have stellar academic records, the best Dartmouth ever admitted. Of those accepted from school that ranks their classes 96 percent are in the top 10 percent, with 527 serving as their class valedictorian or salutatorian. Nearly half, 46 percent of those valedictorians or salutatorians are students of color, with 13 percent “foreign citizens.” The Class of 2021 also has the highest SAT scores ever admitted with an average of 1495.

Lee Coffin, the dean of admissions and financial aid, commented on the academically extraordinary Class of 2021. Coffin noted, “This is a really dynamic group of students. They are intellectually engaged, curious, adventuresome, kind, and imaginative, and they will be a tremendous addition to the Dartmouth community.”

The class is also the most diverse coming from all over the US, the 50 states, and territories. California continues to be the top state where student are admitted, but also New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Florida, with 47 students coming Dartmouth’s home state of New Hampshire. Internationally, the incoming class hails has 225 students from 63 countries predominantly from the United Kingdom, Canada, and South Korea.

Demographically the Class of 2021 is also very diverse, with 51 percent being students of color, 15 percent first generation college students, 10 percent are recruited athletes, and 9 percent are legacies. There is also 59 percent coming from public schools, 21 percent from independent schools and ten from religious schools. Additionally, 63 percent of the incoming class will need financial aid. The most popular major include, “Engineering, economics, biology, government / international relations, and English.”

Harvard University: Among the Ivies, no university has a lower acceptance rate than Harvard College. Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. The acceptance rate is almost the same as last year when 5.22 percent or 2,037 students were admitted out a historic high amount of 39,044 applications. For the regular admission cycle, Harvard accepted 1,118 students. In December as part of their early action program, Harvard accepted 938 applicants out of 6,473 applications for an acceptance rate of 14.5 percent.

Despite other universities touting the diverse freshmen class ever, Harvard’s number are smaller for some minority groups. There were less Latino and Native American students accepted, 11.6 and 1.9 percent respectively down from 12.7 and 2.2 percent. There was, however, and increase the number of African Americans, Asian Americans, and Women admitted this year. Harvard admitted a record number of African American students at 14.6. There was a slight increase in Asian American students accepted at 22.2 percent. This year 49.2 percent of the Class of 2021 will be women. The university is maintaining its international flavor with 11.4 percent of the class coming from outside the US and its territories.

In the incoming class is continuing the movement away from concentrating in the Humanities, with 15.5 percent planning to major in the subject area. Meanwhile, 25.6 percent intend to study the social sciences. The STEM subjects are gaining popularity with 19.3 indicating they want to focus on computer science and engineering.

Princeton University: Princeton University acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was “the lowest in school history.” The University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. Princeton has a “target class size” of 1,308 freshmen. In December, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program. Last year, Princeton had a 6.46% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,894 students accepted out of 29,303 applicants. Additionally, Princeton placed 1,168 students on their waitlist.

The class is also very diverse, with 50.5 percent being female, while 53.4 percent are “racial or ethnic minorities.” The Demographic are also diverse, with 63.8 percent of students coming from public schools, 18.9 first-generation college students and only 10.7 percent being legacies. Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye said, “This shows our commitment to social mobility and socioeconomic diversity.” Princeton accepted students from 49 states and the territories, the most coming from New Jersey, California, New York, Texas, Pennsylvania, Florida, Massachusetts, and Georgia. No students were admitted from Louisiana. Outside of the US students were accepted from 76 countries representing 12.1 percent of the class.

The University of Pennsylvania: UPenn is again hailing their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history. This year the University accepted 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants
for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” Last year, UPenn had a 9.4% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 3,661students accepted out of 38,918 applicants. In December, UPenn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 24 percent acceptance rate. The University believes they will have a targeted 2,445 students enrolling in the fall.

As with all, the Ivies UPenn is calling the Class of 2021 the most diverse. The incoming freshman includes students from all 50 states and the territories, with the most popular states including Pennsylvania, New York, California, New Jersey, Florida and Texas, while 172 students come to the school’s home city Philadelphia. Demographically, 46 percent of those accepted are students of color, 54 percent are female. One out of eight, 13 percent are first-generation college students, while 14 percent are legacies.

The University saw a 10 percent increase in international students coming from 96 countries up from 88. Dean of Admissions Eric Furda remarked on the Class of 2021, “Penn offers of admission are truly going across the country and all around the world. That’s not just tallying states and countries, but thinking about it at the high school level.”

Yale University: Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that are opening this fall. Yale offered admission this regular cycle to 1550 students, up 15 percent from last year. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate.

Last year, Yale had a 6.27% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,972 students accepted out of a record 31,455 applicants. In December, as part of early admission Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the wait list.

Yale is the only Ivy League university to increase their acceptance rate this year. The increase in acceptance rate and number of students is because Yale is opening new residential colleges. In the fall, the school’s Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin colleges will open, and increase each incoming class by approximately 800 students. Despite accepting about 2000 students Yale hopes their final Class of 2021will be 1550 students.

Yale wants the public to know despite accepting more high school seniors this year than ever before, they are still accepting highly qualified students, they are just giving more them the opportunity to study at Yale. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeremiah Quinlan indicated, “Although we were thrilled to send out more offers of admissions this year, I remain humbled by the selectivity of our admissions process. Virtually all of the students we denied will be successful students at other great colleges and universities.”

Yale is hailing the Class of 2021 as the most diverse ever, the same tagline all universities are touting these days. The incoming class comes from all 50 states and 63 countries, and 1,500 high schools. There is also an increase in the minority population accepted promising an incoming class of diversity.

With now 14 residential colleges in four years, Yale’s undergraduate class will go from 5,400 to 6,200 students. Dean of Yale College Jonathan Holloway pointed out, “This expansion touches on every aspect of learning, including teaching, facilities, and financial aid. It also provides a historic opportunity to engage the community in asking what it means to receive an education from Yale.”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education April 2, 2017: Ivy League lowest acceptance rates for Class of 2021

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Ivy League lowest acceptance rates for Class of 2021

By Bonnie K. Goodman , BA MLIS

 (Source: Harvard Admissions Twitter)



It is Ivy League acceptance day. Thursday afternoon, March 30, 2017, at 5 p.m. the Ivy League universities sent out acceptances as thousands of anxious high school seniors found out if they would join the scholarly elite. Late Thursday afternoon Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, The University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Yale University released their acceptance data for the Class of 2021 continuing the trend towards lower acceptance rates for nearly all schools, except Yale.

The following is the Ivy League Class of 2021 acceptance data:

Brown University: Brown University had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. This year Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. Brown also waited listed 1,000 high school seniors. Last year, Brown had a 9% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,919 students accepted out of 32,390 applicants. In December as part of early decision admission, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

Columbia University: Columbia College also had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants. Last year, Columbia had a 6.04% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,193 students accepted out of 36,292 applicants.

Cornell University: Cornell University admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a wait list. Last year, Cornell had a 13.96% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 6,277 students accepted out of 44,966 applicants. In December, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Dartmouth College: Dartmouth College accepted 2,092 students into the Class of 2021out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent, the second largest in the Ivy League. Last year, Dartmouth had a 10.52% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 2,176 students accepted out of 20,675 applicants. In December as part of the early decision program, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Harvard University: Harvard College admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. The acceptance rate is almost the same as last year when 5.22 percent or 2,037 students were admitted out a historic high amount of 39,044 applications. For the regular admission cycle, Harvard accepted 1,118 students. In December as part of their early action program, Harvard accepted 938 applicants out of 6,473 applications for an acceptance rate of 14.5 percent.

Princeton University: Princeton University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. Princeton has a “target class size” of 1,308 freshmen. Last year, Princeton had a 6.46% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,894 students accepted out of 29,303 applicants. In December, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program. Additionally, Princeton placed 1,168 students on their waitlist.

The University of Pennsylvania: UPenn accepted 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” Last year, UPenn had a 9.4% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 3,661students accepted out of 38,918 applicants. In December, UPenn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 24 percent acceptance rate. The University believes they will have a targeted 2,445 students enrolling in the fall.

Yale UniversityYale University accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. Last year, Yale had a 6.27% acceptance rate for the Class of 2020, with 1,972 students accepted out of a record 31,455 applicants. In December, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent. Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the wait list.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.