Education March 29, 2018: Dartmouth has a record year, admits the lowest number to Class of 2022 with 8.7 percent acceptance rate

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EDUCATION

Dartmouth has a record year, admits the lowest number to Class of 2022 with 8.7 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Dartmouth College notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. This year was a record year for Dartmouth, they had the lowest acceptance rate, the highest number of applications in “five years” and accepted the least amount of students since the 1990s. Dartmouth accepted 1,925 students out of 22,033 applications making for an acceptance rate of only 8.7 percent.

Dartmouth College had a larger increase in applications than most of the Ivies, jumping 9.8 percent to 22,005 high school senior applying. Lee Coffin, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid remarked, “The big increases in this year’s pools reflect the early success of our expanded recruitment and the new communications plan we have adopted. We have refocused our message to emphasize excellence in teaching and undergraduate access to outstanding teacher-scholars—and students are responding. While the quantity has risen, so has the quality of this year’s applicant pool.”

On Thursday, Dec. 14, Dartmouth College sent out binding early decision acceptance notifications to 565 high school seniors, the smallest number of students of all the Ivy League schools. The college received a record number of applications, 2,270 applications, the first time the school had over 2,000 applications for the early admissions cycle. The college also had their lowest acceptance rate since the 2010 cycle with 24.9 percent; still, that percentage was the largest of all the Ivies. Dartmouth has filled up 47 percent of the Class of 2022 with those accepted for early decision, 558 have already enrolled.

Last year, Dartmouth College had one of their most selective years, accepting 2,092 students into the Class of 2021 out of 20,034 applications with an acceptance rate 10.4 percent, the second largest in the Ivy League. Dartmouth called last year’s class “the most academically accomplished and globally diverse class the College has ever accepted.” In December 2016 as part of the early decision program for the Class of 2021, Dartmouth accepted 555 applicants out of 1,999 applications for an acceptance rate of 27.8 percent.

Dartmouth also decided to release the academic profile of the accepted students, not just demographics. Of those accepted “97 percent are in the top 10 percent of their high school class,” last year it 96 percent. While the “Mean SAT and ACT scores are 1497 for SATs — a record high — and 33 for ACTs.”

The class is diverse both socio-economically and geographically. The accepted students include an increase in first-generation college students up to 15 percent. Students of color represent half the class, and a majority, 59 percent will graduate from a public high school or charter school.

As with other Ivies, Dartmouth succeeded in attracting lower-income students with their financial aid packages. A majority of the students, 60 percent will apply to financial aid. As the Dartmouth reports, “The College expects to offer around $28 million in need-based scholarships after financial aid awards are finalized.”

Geographically, the students come from all 50 states and the territories. The most predominant states are “California, New York, Massachusetts, Florida and Texas. There is a significant international contingent with 11 percent of the students coming from 65 countries. The majority come from “Brazil, Canada, China, India and the United Kingdom.” Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

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Education March 29, 2018: Cornell has record-low acceptance rate of 10.3 percent for the Class of 2022

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EDUCATION

Cornell has record-low acceptance rate of 10.3 percent for the Class of 2022

Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

(Source: Cornell Admissions Twitter)

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Cornell University notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. This year Cornell admitted 5,288 students out of 51,328 applications; a new record high for the college. Additionally, Cornell waitlisted 6,684 students. The acceptance was also the college’s lowest at 10.3 percent, while it might be a new low for Cornell, but it is one of the highest in the Ivy League.

For the Class of 2021, Cornell University had one of the largest acceptance rates of all the Ivies with 12.5 percent. Cornell admitted 5,889 students from a record number of 47,038 applicants. An additional 5,713 students were placed on a waitlist. For the Class of 2020, Cornell had a 13.96% acceptance rate with 6,277 students accepted out of 44,966 applicants. In December 2016, Cornell accepted approximately 1,350 applicants out of 5,384 early applications for an acceptance rate of 25.6 percent.

Jason C. Locke, associate vice provost for enrollment commended the incoming freshman. Locke told the Cornell Sun, “The exceptionally large applicant pool this year produced a most remarkable class. No doubt Ezra would be proud of the Class of 2022!” While Barbara Knuth, senior vice provost commented, “We have admitted a highly talented and accomplished Class of 2022 who will flourish as Cornellians. We look forward to welcoming them into our campus community.”

Cornell is hailing the incoming class as the “most diverse class in university history.” Students that identify as “underrepresented minorities” constitute 33 percent of the class, a number that has been rising for the last four years. With students of color and Asian-American students, the number jumps to a majority of 54 percent. As with most other of the Ivies, there is a large number of first-generation college students, this year’s class welcomes 700 more to Cornell. Additionally, 60 students will commence their studies in the Spring 2019 semester as part of the colleges First-Year Spring Admission program.

“Geographically,” the class is equally diverse, with students accepted from all 50 states and the territories. Internationally, students are coming from 93 countries and represent 9 percent of the class. The most predominant countries include, “Canada, China, India, South Korea, Singapore and the United Kingdom.” Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 29, 2018: Brown admits record-low for the Class of 2022, 7.2 percent acceptance rate

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EDUCATION

Brown admits record-low for the Class of 2022, 7.2 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Brown University notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. Brown sent out only 1,742 offers of admissions out a historic high of 35,438 applications to the Class of 2022.Their acceptance rate was 7.2 percent overall, while the regular admission cycles rate was only 5.5 percent.

Brown also saw record number of applications for the Class of 2022, they received 35,368 applications, up 8 percent from the previous year, and the highest increase in the last five years. Dean of Admission Logan Powell lauded the applicants in a statement to the Brown Daily Herald. Powell called those vying to be apart of the Class of 2022 “ as strong as any pool in our history.” Powell commended the students, saying, “We continue to be humbled by the incredible talent and diversity of perspective represented in the applicant pool.”

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Brown University admitted 738 students as part of their binding early decision program to the Class of 2022. This year the Ivy League school saw their largest number of applications for the early admission cycle, with 3502 high school seniors applying, 10 percent more than last year. Although Brown has, a higher acceptance rate than the Ivy League schools, it was a low for them, and Brown’s acceptance rate was only 21 percent for the Class of 2022.

Brown set a record low for the Class of 2021 admissions. Last year, Brown had a “record-low” 8.3 acceptance rate, admitting 2,027 applicants for their new freshmen class with just a 6.5 acceptance rate for regular decision. Brown saw a record 32,724 applications. In December 2016 as part of early decision admission for the Class of 2021, Brown accepted 695 applicants out of 3,170 applications for an acceptance rate of 21.9 percent.

Dean Powell praised the incoming class’ qualifications. Powell told the Brown Daily Herald, “There were just so many incredibly qualified students in the applicant pool. We could probably admit three classes of students who are enormously academically qualified from the group of applicants we had.” Powell attributes the high number of applications and the lower acceptance rate to “the Brown Promise initiative, the addition of another A Day on College Hill program and the doubling of travel grants.”

For the Class of 2022, Brown revamped their financial aid now calling it the Brown Promise Initiative. As of the next academic year, students will no longer have loans, but grants for financial aid, making Brown more affordable. In the past two years, 65 percent of the Classes of 2021 and 2022 have or intend to apply for aid.

The incoming class will also be the most diverse socio-economically and geographically. Nearly half 49 percent “identify as students of color,” last year only 47 identified. Unlike the rest of the Ivies there will actually be less first generation college students than the previous year, with 13 percent of the class.

Geographically, the admitted students come from only 48 states, predominantly “California, New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Texas.” There is an increase in international students up to 11 percent, coming fro 76 countries, with the most coming from “China, India, the United Kingdom, Canada and Singapore.” Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion, and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 29, 2018: Princeton accepts record-low for the Class of 2022, 5.5 percent acceptance rate

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EDUCATION

Princeton accepts record-low for the Class of 2022, 5.5 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Princeton University notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. Princeton has the second lowest acceptance of the Ivies, only behind Harvard College. The rate of 5.5 percent is a record-low and more than half percentage point less than for the Class of 2021.

Princeton admitted a total of 1,941 students, 1,142 just this regular admission cycle out of the a record 35,370 applications, 14 percent higher than applied for the Class of 2021. Additionally, 1,125 students were wait listed, normally the university accepts between 18 to 101 students from that list.

Of all the Ivies, Princeton saw the greatest increase in applications and the only one above 10 percent. There were 35,386 high school seniors vying a place in Princeton’s Class of 2022, an increase of 14 percent than from the previous year. To demonstrate just how many more applications Princeton received this cycle the Daily Princetonian noted that in 2008, when students applied for the Class of 2012 there were only 13,695 applications, making a 158 percent increase in applications in the past 10 years.

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was at that point “the lowest in school history.” The University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program.

Princeton first offered early action admission seven years ago. Students can only apply to Princeton in the early admission cycle, but they can notify the college of their decision by May 1. As Princeton points out the landscape now is radically different from 2011 when the college accepted 21.1 percent of early action applicants.

Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye commended the incoming class and all the applicants. Rapelye told the Daily Princetonian, “The Admissions Committee was extremely impressed with the academic quality of all the candidates [for admission], especially those who were admitted.”

Princeton was the only Ivy to indicate the academic profile of the students that applied. As the Princetonian explained, “The applicant pool included 14,273 students had high school GPAs of 4.0, and 17,692 — 50 percent of the total applicant pool — had combined SAT scores of 1400 or higher out of a possible 1600.” Most of the applicants took either the ACT or new SAT, including the writing component, which is still required for applying.

The class is diverse both geographically and socio-economically. Those accepted, however, come from only 48 states, but also the territories, the majority of those accepted come from “New Jersey, California and New York.” The number of international students also increased, with 77 countries represented.

Princeton, like the Ivy League schools, are increasing their financial aid initiatives to appeal to low-income students. Rapelye contributes it to the reason behind the large recording breaking number of applications. Rapelye told the Daily Princetonian, “[That growth] exceeded our expectations. Our outreach to low income backgrounds, students who may be working with community-based organizations, and to schools we haven’t had applicants from before may have contributed. Our financial aid process is generous, and, we believe, second to none.”

There were more first generation college students, representing 17 percent of the incoming class, and 64.5 percent came from public schools. Additionally, Princeton accepted 11.2 percent of students who are “legacy” the children of Princeton graduates, and recruited athletes compromise 11.6 percent of those accepted. Princeton hopes to enroll 1,296 freshmen in the fall semester. Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 29, 2018: Yale admits fewer students to the Class of 2022, lowers acceptance rate to 6.31 percent 

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EDUCATION

Yale admits fewer students to the Class of 2022, lowers acceptance rate to 6.31 percent

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Yale College notified the Class of 2022 of the admission decisions. After last year when Yale became the only Ivy to increase their acceptance rate, now Yale is reversing the trend and their rate was lowered to 6.31 percent. Yale’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced that it accepted 2,229 students from a “record” 35,306 applications they received this year. Additionally, 1,102 applicants were wait listed, however, the college is uncertain whether any on the list will be offered admission.

For the Class of 2022, Yale saw the largest increase in applications for their college in the last five years, with 35,305 applications and rising 7.3 percent since the Class of 2021. As the Yale Daily News explains, “Last year, the number of applications rose around 5 percent from 31,439 for the Class of 2020 to 32,891 for the Class of 2021. Before that, the number of applications rose by 4 percent, from 30,227 for the Class of 2019.” In the five years applications have increased by 19 percent.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, at 5 p.m. Yale notified the Class of 2022 of their decisions on their early action admissions. This year Yale admitted only 842 students, the least out of all the Ivies, out of a record number 5,733 applications.

Yale admitted 1,550 students to the Class of 2021 regular cycle. Yale accepted 2,272 students out of “record” 32,900 applicants, making a 6.9 percent acceptance rate. Yale admitted fewer students than last year’s early admission. In December 2016, as part of early admission, Yale accepted 871 applicants out of 5,086 applications for an acceptance rate of 17.1 percent.

Additionally, 1,181 students were placed on the waitlist. In previous years, Yale used to receive only about 4,700 applications each early admission cycle. Of all the Ivies, only Yale University increased the number of students they accepted for the Class of 2021, because of the two new residential colleges that opened this fall.

Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan commented on the quality and diversity of the incoming class. Quinlan told the Yale Daily News, “All of our admissions officers continue to be impressed with and humbled by the number of highly qualified applicants in our pool. We’re thrilled that the expansion of Yale College has allowed us to offer admission to such a large number of students from such a variety of backgrounds.”

This past fall the college opened to new residential colleges, Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin and plan to accept more students each year as a result. Yale hopes to have 800 more students attending by the time the Class of 2024 is admitted. The college’s expansion goes against the trend of the other Ivies, who are accepting less students and having lowering acceptance rates. Yale plans on having 1,550 freshman enroll in the fall.

Yale is also touting the incoming class as more diverse, with more minorities and lower-income students accepted. Geographically, it also as diverse with students coming from all 50 states and the territories and internationally from 64 countries.

Scott Wallace-Juedes, director of undergraduate financial aid told the Daily News, “Last year Yale was able to offer need-based financial aid awards to more incoming first years than ever before with the expansion of Yale College. My colleagues and I look forward to working with the admitted students to the class of 2022 to ensure that cost of attendance is not a barrier for any admitted student when considering Yale.” Students have until May 1, to notify the college of their decision.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.