Education March 28, 2018: University of Pennsylvania sets record-low acceptance rate for Class of 2022 of 8.39 percent

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EDUCATION

University of Pennsylvania sets record-low acceptance rate for Class of 2022 of 8.39 percent

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League admissions day, on Wednesday, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. the University of Pennsylvania notified the Class of 2022 of their admission decisions. As with other Ivies, Penn saw their number of applications rise and their acceptance rate plummet. Penn had a record 44,482 applicants, but only accepted 3,371 students. The acceptance rate was 8.39 percent a new low for the university, but a higher rate than most of the other Ivies

On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. Ivy League school the University of Pennsylvania sent out 1,312 early decision offers of admission for the Class of 2022. This year Penn received a record number of applications, 7,074 students applied, and 15 percent more to the early decision program for the Class of 2021. As result, the college has its record lowest early admission rate in history at just 18.5 percent down from last year’s 23.2 percent.

The acceptance rate for the Class of 2022 early admission is the lowest in the school’s history, still, the university did not actually admit that much fewer students than last year. Penn admitted 1,312 students this year and last year they accepted 1,354 students. Penn admits over half of the freshmen class through their early decision program. As the student paper, the Daily Pennsylvanian noted, “Last year approximately 55 percent of the total 2,445 spots available were filled by Early Decision applicants.”

Last year, Penn hailed their Class of 2021 acceptance rate as the lowest in history, accepting 3,699 students from 40,413 applicants for “a record-low 9.15 percent acceptance rate.” In December 2016, Penn sent notifications to 1,364 students that they were accepted as part of the early decision program with a 22 percent acceptance rate.

Dean of Admissions Eric Furda commented on the incoming Class of 2022, saying “We are thrilled about the possibility of these students joining our community, brining their intellectual curiosities, analytical minds and collaborative spirits to enrich our campus. We can’t wait to meet them.”

With the rise in applications, there is an increase in acceptances in every demographic group. The Daily Pennsylvanian reported that “one in seven admitted students” are first-generation college students, last year it was one in eight. There is also an increase in the number of low-income students, as the university’s “Board of Trustees increased the financial aid budget by 5.3 percent,” giving Penn their “largest financial aid budget in history.”

The students come from all fifty states and the territories. As the Daily Pennsylvanian notes they come predominantly from “Washington D.C. Puerto Rico and Guam. Pennsylvania, New York, California, New Jersey, Florida, and Texas.” More international students were accepted as well up 6 percent and representing 104 countries. Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

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Education March 28, 2018: Harvard hits new record-low admitting the Class of 2022 with only a 4.59 percent acceptance rate

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EDUCATION

Harvard hits new record-low admitting the Class of 2022 with only a 4.59 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League decision day, on Wednesday evening, March 28, 2018, at 7 p.m. Harvard College notified the Class of 2022 of the admission decisions. This year Harvard will keep it’s crown as the most selective school in the Ivy League. The college beat its own record clocking in a 4.59 percent acceptance rate lower by nearly a half a percentage point from the Class of 2021’s 5.2 percent rate. As the Harvard Crimson noted, “This year marks the first time Harvard’s admission rate has ever dipped below 5 percent.” Harvard admitted only 1,962 students out of their record 42,749 applications. Of those admitted 998 receiving regular cycle offers of admission, which was according to the Harvard Crimson “2.43 percent of the total 36,119 regular decision applicants, plus the 4,882 students deferred in the early action process.”

This past cycle, Harvard saw a record number of applications with 42,742 students applying. The college credits the increase on their financial aid packages and consideration for more low-income students applying. For the Class of 2022, there was as the Harvard Gazette notes, an “increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.”

Harvard College notified students by email on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 12, 2017, at 5 p.m. if they were accepted to the Class of 2022, rejected or waitlisted. Harvard admitted just 964 students to early action out of 6,630 applicants, an admission rate of just 14.5 percent to their early admissions program. Harvard is the most selective Ivy League college, and the elite Stanford University only beats it in the country.

In total for the Class of 2021, Harvard admitted 2,056 students out of a record of 39,506 applicants, to have a 5.2 percent acceptance rate. In December 2016, Harvard admitted their lowest number of early applicants, accepting just 938 students out of 6,473 applications to their early admissions program for the Class of 2021. Their admissions represented just 14.5 percent of the applicant pool down only 0.3 percent from 2015. Harvard admitted nearly the same percentage of early applicants as the Class of 2020 a 14.53 acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 versus a 14.49 percent rate for 2020 an addition of less than a half percentage point.

Although Harvard saw a record number of applicants they accepted less students than last year. For the Class of 2021 a record number accepted the colleges offer of admission leading to an overcrowding in the residences. The college also hopes to admit 40 to 100 students on the waitlist, last year none were.

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons commended the incoming freshman class. Fitzsimons expressed to the Crimson, “They are quite an amazing cohort of people because they’re coming from the widest range of economic and ethnic backgrounds in our history.”

The class is one of Harvard’s most diverse ever. Women represent a small majority of the class, with 50.1 percent, up from last year’s 49.2 percent, and for “The first time in 10 years, a majority of accepted students are women.” The diversity extends to all demographic groups, including racial minorities making record strides. African-American students represent 15.5 percent, up from 14.6. This year 12.2 percent of the class are Hispanic students, up from 11.6 percent. Native Americans, however, saw a marginal rise from 1.9 to 2 percent.

Asian-Americans represented the largest minority group accepted. A record 22.7 percent up slightly from 22.2 percent as the university faces a lawsuit on their admission process for the group that has also sparked a United States Department of Justice discrimination investigation. Harvard has steadfastly denied the allegations, blaming other factors for lower rates in admitting Asian-American students in the past.

Harvard has been trying to attract more lower income students with their generous Harvard Financial Aid Initiative, and it has worked with a Class of 2022 that is more economically diverse. The college has made the greatest gains with first generation college students, with 17.3 percent up from 15.1 last year. Over half of Harvard undergrads receive financial aid, 20 percent are from low-income families and do not have to contribute anything to their tuition, while “a record 20.3 percent of the Class of 2022 will be eligible for Federal Pell grants.

This year’s class is diverse geographically as well. They come from “50 states and 90 countries.” International student numbers have rebounded up to 12 percent from last year’s 11.4 percent. Harvard hopes to have a class of 1,665 freshman in the fall. Students have until May 1, to notify the college of their decision.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Education March 28, 2018: Columbia accepts record-low for the Class of 2022 just 5.5 percent acceptance rate

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EDUCATION

Columbia accepts record-low for the Class of 2022 just 5.5 percent acceptance rate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

It’s Ivy League acceptance day, and on Wednesday afternoon at 3 p.m., March 28, 2018, the admissions office at Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science mailed out their decisions for the regular cycle to the Class of 2022. This year Columbia’s acceptance rate fell nearly a third of a percentage point from last year to 5.5 percent. The college admitted only 2,214 applicants. Like the rest of the Ivy League, Columbia received a record number of applications this year, 40,203 combined, early and regular admission cycles. According to the Columbia Spectator that is 8 percent more than for the Class of 2021. Columbia did not release any demographic data for the incoming freshman class.

On Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, instead of releasing their early decision data, Columbia College only released the number of applications they received this cycle. That evening at 7 p.m. Columbia notified high school seniors whether they would be joining the Class of 2022. This year Columbia received 4,085 early decision applications to Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, just one less than for the Class of 2021.

For the Class of 2021, Columbia College had a lower acceptance rate, representing just 5.8 percent of their applicant pool. Columbia admitted just 2,185 from a record 37,389 applicants. For the Class of 2020, Columbia had a 6.04% acceptance rate, with 2,193 students accepted out of 36,292 applicants. Columbia is notorious for divulging the least information of all the Ivies about their incoming freshmen class only releasing more data for the upcoming application year. Students have until May 1, to accept the offers of admission.

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.