Education December 13, 2017: Princeton hits new early action admission record low with Class of 2022

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

EDUCATION

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Medium, 12-13-17

Princeton admitted a record low acceptance rate to their early action admissions for the Class of 2022, only 14.7 percent of applicants. Source: Princeton Admissions Twitter)

Another day in December another Ivy League university sends out their early admission decision to high school seniors. On Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at 3 pm, Princeton University sent out early action admission offers to 799 lucky school seniors to the Class of 2022. Princeton had a record number of applications this early action cycle with 5,402 applications with 8 percent more than last year and 57 percent more applications than six years ago in 2011. Because of the number of applicants, Princeton’s acceptance rate was a record low with only 14.7 percent of student accepted down from last year’s 15.4 percent.

Princeton’s acceptance rate for the Class of 2021 was “the lowest in school history.” The University invited just 6.1 percent of applicants to join the University, 1,890 students out of a “record” 31,056 applicants. In December 2016, Princeton accepted 770 applicants out of 5,003 applications for an acceptance rate of 15.4 percent as part of the “single-choice early action” program. Princeton first offered early action admission seven years ago. Students can only apply to Princeton in the early admission cycle, but they can notify the college of their decision by May 1. As Princeton points out the landscape now is radically different from 2011 when the college accepted 21.1 percent of early action applicants.

Those accepted to the Class of 2022 early action come from “48 countries and 44 states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.” Last year to the Class of 2021, Princeton accepted students from 45 countries and 42 states plus DC and Puerto Rico. The university says that 44 percent of the accepted students this year are minorities, up from 43 percent last year. This year 11 percent are international students, the same as last year. Both this year’s class and last year’s is evenly balance by gender, 50 percent are women and 50 percent are men.

For the Class of 2022 fewer students come from public or charter schools, with 56 percent versus 57 percent for the Class of 2021. The same amount of students who are the first in their family to attend college were accepted as last year, with 14 percent. This year Princeton accepted more legacy students, the children of alumni, with 17 percent of the Class of 2022, whereas they represented 16 percent of the Class of 2021 early action admissions.

Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye commented on this year’s class. Rapelye said, “The admission committee was impressed with the strength and depth of the pool this year. Our admission officers worked long hours reading the applications of the candidates, and we had to make difficult choices. The admitted students have demonstrated extraordinary academic achievements as well as extracurricular talents throughout high school. We are thrilled with the quality of these students and their commitments to their communities. We look forward to all the ways they will contribute to Princeton.”

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University), is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor. She is a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Advertisements
Leave a comment

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: