Politics August 17, 2016: Trump adds to staff leadership in attempt to reboot his campaign

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

Trump adds to staff leadership in attempt to reboot his campaign

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Kellyanne Conway, president and chief executive officer of Polling Co. Inc./Woman Trend, smiles during an interview on "With All Due Respect" in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, July 5, 2016. Asked how Trump reassures conservatives about his positions on issues such as abortion without losing ground with voters in the center, Republican pollster Conway, one of Trump's new senior strategists, said he would work to shift the spotlight to Clinton. Photographer: Chris Goodney/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Kellyanne Conway, president and chief executive officer of Polling Co. Inc./Woman Trend, smiles during an interview on “With All Due Respect” in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, July 5, 2016. Asked how Trump reassures conservatives about his positions on issues such as abortion without losing ground with voters in the center, Republican pollster Conway, one of Trump’s new senior strategists, said he would work to shift the spotlight to Clinton. Photographer: Chris Goodney/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Republican nominee Donald Trump is shaking up his campaign staff leadership in hopes that can still beat opponent Hillary Clinton in the general election in November. On Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016, Trump made two major changes to his staff adding a new CEO Stephen Bannon executive chairman of Breitbart News and promoting his senior advisor and pollster Kellyanne Conway to campaign manager. Since the Republican National Convention, Trump’s campaign has been floundering with controversy after controversy dogging him as he falls in the polls.

Trump in a campaign statement announced the additions, calling them “extremely capable, highly qualified people who love to win and know how to win.” Continuing the GOP nominee praised Bannon and Conway, saying, “I believe we’re adding some of the best talents in politics, with the experience and expertise needed to defeat Hillary Clinton in November and continue to share my message and vision to Make America Great Again. I am committed to doing whatever it takes to win this election, and ultimately become President because our country cannot afford four more years of the failed Obama-Clinton policies which have endangered out financial and physical security.”

According to the statement, Bannon will have “a new position designed to bolster the business-like approach of Mr. Trump’s campaign” consisting of “oversight of the campaign staff and operations.” Conway will focus on Trump’s campaign message. Just hours before, the Trump campaign announced that former embattle FOX News head Roger Ailes will be prepping Trump for the three presidential debates, however, the campaign is now denying Ailes involvement.

Trump is retaining Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort although he might have been involved in a “corruption scandal” involving Ukraine. Manafort will stay at the campaign’s Washington, DC office, and according to CNN he will be “largely sidelined.”  Bannon will be at the helms,  taking over as Trump’s “top advisor” where the message will return the focus of Trump as the “outsider candidate.”

The campaign staff changes are weeks in the making, as tensions rose between the GOP nominee and Manafort. Trump’s campaign has been free fall since the convention, with controversy after controversy, and lagging poll numbers that have Trump trailing Clinton in both the national polls and battleground states. Manafort wanted to mold Trump into a tradition presidential candidate, while Trump veered towards the freewheeling style that brought him success in the primaries, a clash that has brought negative results recently.

Prominent GOP donor Rebekah Mercer and her father, Robert influenced Trump’s decision, as well as his children and advisors Donald, Jr., Eric and Ivanka Trump and son-in-law, Jared Kushner. Kushner was the one that met with Trump’s top campaign official both new and old at Trump Tower to notify them of the changes.

Clinton attacked Trump on his campaign shakeup at a rally held in Cleveland, Ohio. Clinton emphasized that nothing is different about Trump even with his new and improved campaign staff. The Democratic nominee pointed out, “I think it’s fair to say that Donald Trump has shown us who he is. He can hire and fire anybody he wants from his campaign. They can make him read new words from a teleprompter, but he’s still the same man who insults gold star families, demeans women, mocks people with disabilities and thinks he knows more about ISIS than our generals. There is no new Donald Trump. This is it.”

Trump seems to agree but not for the same reasons Clinton implied. Speaking to a Wisconsin radio station, WKDT Trump said he did not want to change his campaign style. The GOP nominee expressed, “I am who I am. It’s me. I don’t want to change. Everyone talks about, ‘Oh are you going to pivot?’ I don’t want to pivot. You have to be you. If you start pivoting you are not being honest with people.”

Politics August 17, 2016: FBI hands Congress over Clinton interview notes investigation report

HEADLINE NEWS

Headline_News

POLITICS

FBI hands Congress over Clinton interview notes investigation report

By Bonnie K. Goodman

WASHINGTON D.C., July 7, 2016-- U.S. FBI Director James Comey swears an oath before the House Oversight Committee over investigation into Hillary Clinton's email system, on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, July 7, 2016. U.S. FBI Director James Comey on Thursday defended his decision not to recommend charges against Hillary Clinton, but refuted several of her statements to justify the use of private email setup as secretary of state. (Xinhua/Bao Dandan via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON D.C., July 7, 2016– U.S. FBI Director James Comey swears an oath before the House Oversight Committee over investigation into Hillary Clinton’s email system, on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, July 7, 2016. U.S. FBI Director James Comey on Thursday defended his decision not to recommend charges against Hillary Clinton, but refuted several of her statements to justify the use of private email setup as secretary of state. (Xinhua/Bao Dandan via Getty Images)

The FBI handed over its report on their decision not to recommend criminal charges for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton over her private email server to Congress. The FBI sent the classified report originally for the Department of Justice and interview memos, called 302s to the House Oversight Committee on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016, following through on their request. The House is also is also request the DOJ file charges because Clinton perjured herself in her sworn testimony to the House’s Benghazi committee.

FBI Acting Assistant Director Jason V. Herring included a letter to “House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz” and “ranking Democratic member, Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings” re-explaining the bureau’s decision not to charge Clinton. Herring wrote, “The FBI conducted this investigation, as it does all investigations, in a competent, honest and independent way. As the director stated, the FBI did find evidence that Secretary Clinton and her colleagues were extremely careless in their handling of certain, very sensitive, highly classified information.”

Continuing Herring clarified, “The term ‘extremely careless’ was intended to be a common sense way of describing the actions of Secretary Clinton and her colleagues. The director did not equate ‘extreme carelessness’ with the legal standard of ‘gross negligence’ that is required by the statute. In this case, the FBI assessed that the facts did not support a recommendation to prosecute her or others within the scope of the investigation for gross negligence.” Herring also suggested that usually what Clinton would be subject to is “severe administrative consequences.”

Among the documents, the FBI handed over was the summary of Clinton’s three and a half hour interview with the bureau that took place last month. FBI Director James Comey promised the reports and memos when he testified on July 7 before the House Oversight panel, saying he would do “everything I can possibly give you under the law and to doing it as quickly as possible.”

The documents are considered classified and will never be made public. Republicans are trying to keep Clinton’s email scandal in the limelight the election, hoping it can damage her bid for the presidency despite leading Republican Donald Trump in the polls. The FBI issued a statement warning that the information should not be made public, writing, “The material contains classified and other sensitive information and is being provided with the expectation it will not be disseminated or disclosed without FBI concurrence.”

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) issued a statement, however, arguing the documents should be made available to the public. Grassley wrote, “On initial review, it seems that much of the material given to the Senate today, other than copies of the large number of emails on Secretary Clinton’s server containing classified information, is marked ‘unclassified/for official use.’ The FBI should make as much of the material available as possible. The public’s business ought to be public, with few exceptions. The people’s interest would be served in seeing the documents that are unclassified. The FBI has made public statements in describing its handling of the case, so sharing documents in support of those statements wherever appropriate would make sense.”
Clinton campaign responded with a statement, “This is an extraordinarily rare step that was sought solely by Republicans for the purposes of further second-guessing the career professionals at the FBI. We believe that if these materials are going to be shared outside the Justice Department, they should be released widely so that the public can see them for themselves, rather than allow Republicans to mischaracterize them through selective, partisan leaks.”

The spokesperson for the House Oversight Committee confirmed receipt in a statement, “The FBI has turned over a ‘number of documents’ related to their investigation of former Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal email server. Committee staff is currently reviewing the information that is classified SECRET. There are no further details at this time.”

Congressional Republican are looking to make sure Clinton pays as CNN pointed out a “political price” for her actions during her tenure at the State Department since the FBI did not recommend criminal charges. Reps. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Bob Goodlatte, R-Virginia sent a letter to the Department of Justice asking the DOJ to charge Clinton with perjury claiming she perjured herself during her testimony to the House’s Benghazi committee.

Republicans are accusing Clinton of lying four times in her testimony to the committee saying what she said countered what she told the FBI. In the letter, Chaffetz and Goodlatte wrote, “The evidence collected by the (FBI) during its investigation of Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal email system during her time as secretary of state appears to directly contradict several aspects of her sworn testimony.”

On Monday, Aug. 15, 35 Republicans led by Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.) called on Comey to release Clinton’s interview notes because they believe she perjured herself. Tuesday morning before the documents were handed over Marino appeared on Fox News where he said about Clinton, “That she lied under oath to Congress when she came into testify. And if she lied, she perjured herself. She lied to Congress, therefore she can be prosecuted and spend as long as 10 years in prison for doing that. The director of the FBI, the Justice Department, in my opinion, they’re taking direction from the White House saying, ‘Do nothing about this.'”